Karlskirche - St Charles Church, Vienna

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Vienna's famous baroque church

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  • the top of the column
    the top of the column
    by croisbeauty
  • the portico
    the portico
    by croisbeauty
  • the cupola of Karlskirche
    the cupola of Karlskirche
    by croisbeauty
  • metallemon's Profile Photo

    Easter Sunday

    by metallemon Written May 22, 2007

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    We attended a part of Easter Sunday's ceremony in Karlskirche. The church is very beautiful, surrounded with green garden and Karlsplatz, the square in front of Karlskirche, has a big fountain (we found it empty!) with a sculpture in it!
    At the entrance of Karlskirche there are two angels. The left one represents the Old testament and the right the New testament.
    The church is a mix of baroque style and oriental. It's different from typical western Europe churches!
    Next to church and platz there is the Museum of Ciy of Vienna.

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    St Charles Church

    by alancollins Written Jan 2, 2007

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    St Charles Church

    The Karlskirche, or St. Charles Church, is one of Vienna's greatest buildings. In 1713, the Black Plague swept Vienna, and Emperor Charles VI made a vow that if the plague abated, he would build a church dedicated to his namesake, St. Charles Borromeo. St. Charles was a 16th century Italian bishop famous for ministering to plague victims. The emperor's prayer was answered, and construction on the church began in 1715. Though commissioned by the emperor to thank God for his answered prayer, the Baroque church was also designed to glorify the power and rights of the Habsburg Empire. The first builder was Johann Bernard Fischer von Erlach, who started the original work from 1716 to 1722. After his death in 1723, his son, Joseph Emanuel, took over, finishing the work in 1737. When it was finished, the church received mixed reviews and it was regarded as something of an architectural curiosity. The columns at the front of the building display scenes from the life of Charles Borromeo in a spiral relief; however they also recall the Pillars of Hercules and act as symbols of imperial power. The towers give the appearance of minarets on a mosque. The entrance is flanked by angles from the Old and New Testaments. The green copper dome of the church rises 236 feet high, and is a dramatic landmark on the Viennese skyline.

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    Awesome Columns!

    by longsanborn Written Nov 28, 2006

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    When you get to the Karlskirche, Vienna's finest Baroque church, you will be awed by the massive size of the church, especially the two big columns and the dome. You should go inside the church to see the magnificent high altar and the frescos in the Cupola. It is a beautiful and elegant church.

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    Afraid of Heights?

    by rcsparty Written Oct 26, 2006

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    This church was built as a result of the Black Plague by Emperor Karl VI. Construction began in 1714, and two copies of Trajan Column frame the impressive copper dome. It was set outside the city center to provide better viewing of the church. It is well worth the fee to go inside, if you are not afraid of heights.

    I went into the church with my wife and another couple, where we boarded what seemed like a temporary elevator taking us to a wood platform across the base of the dome. You then walk across a wood platform to a series of stairs going to the cupola. At that point, one of the group got nervous and returned to the elevator. When you get to the stairs, there is a sign that says 'no more then 15 people', but you can't see how many are already on them. So we lost another of our group. About half-way up, the scaffolding feels like it is swaying, and person number 3 headed for the elevator. I was rewarded with fantastic views from the cupola, but admittedly was looking for something to hold, if the whole thing came tumbling down.

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    Built by Emporer Karl VI

    by gordonilla Written Sep 25, 2006
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    The church was founded by Emporer Karl VI in 1716, in thanks for the ending of the black death. The imaginative conception of the church is often considered the high water mark of Austria's baroque church architrecture.The two copies of the Trajan Columns frame the landmark copper dome of the church.

    The architects, Fischer von Erlach and his son, set the church outside the crowded city centre; and it is now argued that the orginal thoughts of how it should be seen have been spoiled by the newer buildings set around it and Karlsplatz.

    Although founded by Emporer Karl, it is the life of St Karl Booromaus to whom the church is dedicated.

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  • Baroque at its best

    by sabsi Written Sep 10, 2006

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    Karlskirche, Vienna
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    Probably the nicest church of Vienna is Karlskirche. You can see its dome from far away in quite a few areas around Karlsplatz, it seems to attract you to come over and see more of it. The church was built after the black death had caused tens of thousands of victims in the 18th century. It's the biggest baroque building north of the Alps.

    Unfortunately there is a fee charged to enter the church. As I mentioned here several times already, I don't pay for churches. So I can't tell you what it looks like inside. I bet it's impressive though...

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    Naschmarkt

    by filipdebont Written May 27, 2006

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    Day 5 : Karlsplatz

    Enkel de foto werd gepost, in afwachting van de informatie, deze informatie komt wat later.

    bedankt voor uw bezoek en tot nog eens.

    I have just posted the photograph, the text with more information will follow later on

    Thanks for your visit and you are welcome to revisit later on

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    Secession Building **

    by filipdebont Written May 27, 2006

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    Seccession Building
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    Day 5 : Karlsplatz

    Enkel de foto werd gepost, in afwachting van de informatie, deze informatie komt wat later.

    bedankt voor uw bezoek en tot nog eens.

    I have just posted the photograph, the text with more information will follow later on

    Thanks for your visit and you are welcome to revisit later on

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  • mary2u99's Profile Photo

    Karlskirche

    by mary2u99 Updated Mar 23, 2006

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    Karlskirche
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    Karlskirche is the famous baroque church in Vienna and was built to honor Saint Borromeo. The project was of Johann Fischer von Erlach.

    In winter there is the Christmas market (Christkindlmarkts) and it was worth a visit especially to warm yourself with some 'Gluhwein' which is bursting with spicy flavors. The Christmas markets also have some wooden handcrafted gifts, food like sausages, pretzels, gingerbread, nuts and etc.

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    Karlskirche

    by antistar Written Mar 18, 2006

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    Karlskirche, Vienna
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    This magnificent baroque church hadn't even been on my tourist radar at first, given the vast array of alternative sights to steal my attention. However, after happening upon an article at the Daily Telegraph on the wonders of Vienna, I saw that Nicholas Parson (author of the Blue Guide Austria) had this answer to the question: What's the first thing you do when you return?.

    "Walk to the Karlsplatz to see Fischer von Erlach's matchless Karlskirche, a triumph of high baroque fronted by two replica Roman columns. It's even better lit up at night; and better still on a snowy evening."

    Well it just so happened that it was snowing when I read that. And I had a gap in my schedule for the last evening in Vienna, so I headed down to Karlsplatz to catch one of Vienna's most amazing views. Something I may never glimpse on any other visit.

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  • Karlskirche

    by MishyM Written Mar 1, 2006

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    Karlskirche

    The Karlskirche is a beautiful church located in the city centre of Vienna, and was designed by Johann Fischer von Erlach, begun in 1715 and finished in 1737.

    It was dedicated to the saint Carlo Borromeo and commissioned by the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI after Vienna was delivered from the plaque. Karlskirche is one of the most striking features of Vienna, and is certainly worth seeing in person.

    Two of the churches most striking features are its columns on either side of the church itself. These are said to be modelled on the pillars of Trajan and Marcus Aurelius in Rome and are said to represent Austrian imperialism.

    I was told many time to visit this beautiful church, but it wasn?t until I had lived in Vienna for 3 months that I found the time to do so, and I am very glad I did, as I have seen few churches since that are so unique and appealing in appearance, inside and out.

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    The Church Of St. Karl

    by viddra Updated Jan 28, 2006

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    Karlskirche
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    Karlskirche (the St. Karl's Church) is another must-do when you're in Vienna. It's a combination of Greek, Roman and Byzantine elements. The church was built in 1716-1737 and dedicated to St. Karl Borromeo. Its 2.47m-high columns are decorated with scenes from his life.

    You'll also have a chance to go up into the cupola and take a close look at beautiful frescoes.

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  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    Church of St Charles

    by fishandchips Written Jan 23, 2006

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    Church of St Charles

    Emperor Charles VI vowed to build this church if the black plague stopped. Construction on Karlskirche, dedicated to St. Charles Borromeo, began in 1716. Rottmayr painted many of the frescoes inside the church. The green copper dome is 72m (236 ft.) high, a dramatic landmark on the Viennese skyline. Two columns, spinoffs from Trajan's Column in Rome, flank the front of the church, which opens onto Karlsplatz. There's also a sculpture by Henry Moore in a little pool. All in all it is a very interesting place to visit.

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  • Escadora7's Profile Photo

    another church-visit: Karlskirche

    by Escadora7 Updated Dec 19, 2005

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    top of Karlskirche
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    I grew up in Vienna, but never actually visited the Karlskirche until last year, when Ash, my mom, and I decided to see it close-up (she had lived in Vienna for about 40 years and hadn't seen it either!). The church is Vienna's most famous baroque building, and with it's big green cuppola has become one of the city's landmarks. If you have a chance to go there, make sure to take a close look at the tall white stone pillars outside the church and the scenes delicately engraved on them. Once you enter, the almost overbearlingly huge altar draws you to the front of the church immediately. You can pay an extra couple of Euros to take the elevator ride up to the top of the cuppola to get a closer look at the Michael Rottmeyr frescos. But that's not the end of it - from here on you can venture up to the very top of the church via stairs. Poor Ashie didn't know what he was in for - I suffered from extreme vertigo, and my mother wasn't physically too fit to handle those stairs (yet insisted to make her way up to the top). :-)

    Opening hours:
    9.00-12.30pm and 1.00-6.00pm (Mo - Sat)
    1.00-6.00pm (Sun + holidays)

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    Thanks for the plague...

    by morgenhund Written Nov 6, 2005

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    Karlskirche, Wien
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    The Karlskirche, which is dedicated to St Charles Borromeo, the Saint associated with the relief from the plague, was built as thanks for the end of the plague in Vienna in 1713. It was designed and built by Johann Bernard Fischer von Erlach and his son, Josef Emanuel and took 26 years to build. The columns, which are freestanding on either side of the Cathedral, have reliefwork depictions and for all its grandeur externally, the church is refreshingly plain inside. In winter the pond in front of the church is drained, in summer it is a rather fine duck pond. It can be seen across the Resselpark and looks equally impressive by night when it is usually lit up.

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