Minoritenkirche - Church of the Minoriti, Vienna

4 out of 5 stars 4 Stars - 17 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Minoritenkirche
    Minoritenkirche
    by croisbeauty
  • Minoritenkirche - Church of the Minoriti
    by croisbeauty
  • Minotitenkirche
    Minotitenkirche
    by croisbeauty
  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Minoritenkirche. Main Portal.

    by Oleg_D. Updated Apr 12, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Main portal has three gates with tympanums but only tympanums of central and southern gates have been decorated with the scenes from the Gospels. Tympanum of central gate demonstrates the scene with Crucifixion. The Tympanum is divided into three fields, whereby in the middle field, Christ on a cross is displayed. On the left are Mary with Mary Magdalene and other female figures. On the right are John the Evangelist, Saint Longinus the Centurion, Roman legionary and another male figure. Fortunately sculptor created Longinus and legionary as the fully armored men-at arms of his own times. That’s why we can see here the knights in the armors so typical for second part of XIV century. Although they have full plate leg and arm defenses they still have no full plate cuirass, instead they are wearing so-called coats of plates made out of iron strips riveted to canvas coat. Tympanum over south gate shows us Saint Francis and two female saints.

    Admission is free but any donations are welcomed and highly appreciated.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flashlight and tripod.
    Hours:
    Summer 08:00 - 18:00
    Winter 08:00 - 17:00

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Odiseya's Profile Photo

    The Italian National Church

    by Odiseya Written Feb 3, 2014
    Church of Mary of the Snow (Minoritenkirche)

    This unusual church is monument of great historical importance. It was date from 1350. During its "life" it changes owner and its appearance. Interesting is that present official name this church is Church of Mary of the Snow (Santa Maria Maggiore) and it is a pride of Italian minorities. But Minoriten church is the commonly used name even today and it is located on same named square.
    I find this gem on my walking tour in first district.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Minoritenkirche

    by Oleg_D. Written Feb 1, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    According to unclear sources Saint Francis of Assisi asked the Duke Leopold VI on his return from the Holy Land in 1219 to permit some Franciscans to conduct the prayers in Vienna. Five years later in 1224, first group of Franciscan monks arrived to Vienna. They were given endowed a piece of land between the Scots Monastery and the ducal residence. Franciscans also known as the Brothers Minorites began to build a monastery, which is mentioned in documents in 1234. Unfortunately nothing is left today of that Romanesque building.
    The great fire of 1276 has burned a large part of the monastery. That’s why at the same year, the foundation cornerstone was laid by King Premysl Ottokar II for a new church on the current site which became one of the first Gothic churches in Eastern Austria. The monarch also promised tax exemption for all who had helped to build the church. King Ottokar has been killed at the Battle of Dürnkrut and Jedenspeigen on August 26, 1278. His embalmed body remained for thirty weeks in the chapter house of the monastery until he was transferred to Znojmo and finally to Prague.
    New Duke Albrecht II later supported the building process. The Gothic choir was built between 1316 and 1328, and used as a mausoleum for the XIV and XV centuries. Construction of the church was finally completed in 1350.
    The Minoritenkirche suffered serious damages during the first and second Turkish sieges of 1529 and 1683 respectively. It is worth to notice that during the second Turkish siege the belfry of Minoritenkirche was used as a watchtower and therefore was bombarded by the Turkish artillery several times and badly damaged. The top of the bell tower was then replaced by a flat tiled roof which you still can observe today. In the course of the religious politics of Emperor Joseph II, Franciscans were moved to a Trinitarian monastery on the Alserstrasse in 1783 and the Minoritenkirche was given to the local Italian community, which was founded in Vienna in 1625 under the leadership of William Lamormaini. The church thereupon was renamed to “Italian National Church of Saint Mary of the Snow” and last until today.
    Admission is free but any donations are welcomed and highly appreciated.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flashlight and tripod.
    Hours:
    Summer 08:00 - 18:00
    Winter 08:00 - 17:00

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Minoritenkirche by night.

    by Oleg_D. Written Feb 1, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    Of course church is closed after 18:00 hours. But anyway try to have a look at Minoritenkirche by night and the dark and under electric light. It is looking like so beautiful and mysterious.
    Admission is free but any donations are welcomed and highly appreciated.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flashlight and tripod.
    Hours:
    Summer 08:00 - 18:00
    Winter 08:00 - 17:00

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Minoritenkirche. Exterior

    by Oleg_D. Written Jan 31, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Statue of Saint Francis of Assisi was installed on the north side of the church in 2003. Saint Francis traditionally preaches to the animals and birds. I like this monument.
    The monument of Clemens Maria Hofbauer is on the north side of the church. Hofbauer was a powerful preacher and spent four years in this church as a rector. He was canonized a saint of the Catholic Church on May 20, 1909 by Pope Pius X. Unfortunately I haven’t paid any attention to that monument.
    Church also has columned gallery along its southern wall. You can find the grave slabs, mostly of XVII-XVIII centuries in that gallery.
    Admission is free but any donations are welcomed and highly appreciated.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flashlight and tripod.
    Hours:
    Summer 08:00 - 18:00
    Winter 08:00 - 17:00

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    High Altar

    by Oleg_D. Written Jan 31, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Although the high altar and the pulpit seem as natural gothic, both of them were made in neo-Gothic design by Johann Ferdinand Hetzendorf of Hohenberg who was born 1733. The large altarpiece shows a painting of the Our Lady of the Snow lifted up by angels in the Church of St. Maria Maggiore in Rome, Italy. In the lower part of the painting the Roman mother church can be seen.
    Admission is free but any donations are welcomed and highly appreciated.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flashlight and tripod.
    Hours:
    Summer 08:00 - 18:00
    Winter 08:00 - 17:00

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Minoritenkirche. Interiors

    by Oleg_D. Written Jan 31, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The walls covered with frescoes of the coats of arms of Austrian aristocratic families who either contributed to the construction of the Church or are buried here. There are excellent murals showing mostly biblical scenes. Church also can boast with nice stain glass windows and huge organ.

    Admission is free but any donations are welcomed and highly appreciated.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flashlight and tripod.
    Hours:
    Summer 08:00 - 18:00
    Winter 08:00 - 17:00

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Mosaic of “The Last Supper”

    by Oleg_D. Written Jan 25, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The most noteworthy and most popular among the tourists masterpiece inside the church is a mosaic copy of Leonardo Da Vinci “The Last Supper”. It situated on the northern wall. That mosaic was made in the original size by the Italian artist from Rome Giacomo Raffaelli between 1805 and 1814. This mosaic was commissioned by Napoleon I after he conquered Vienna, but before his abdication it was not finished yet. After that, Emperor Franz II bought it for Belvedere Palace in Vienna and finally it was left to Emperor Ferdinand and installed in Minoritenkirche in 1845-1847 where it remains to present day. Dimensions of the mosaic are 9.18 x 4.47 m and weight about 20 tons. If you are not satisfied with poor condition of original then you can enjoy a copy here.
    Among the masterpieces of that church you cam see the statue of Virgin Mary of Family made before 1345. Although the sculptor is unknown but we know that it was donated in 1345 by Duke Albrecht II to the Minoritenkirche to decorate the interior of the church.
    And at last we can see the fresco of Saint Francis dates from the late XV or the early XVI Century by an unknown artist. Saint Francis traditionally demonstrates his stigmatas.

    Admission is free but any donations are welcomed and highly appreciated.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flashlight and tripod.
    Hours:
    Summer 08:00 - 18:00
    Winter 08:00 - 17:00

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Sepulchers & Grave slabs.

    by Oleg_D. Updated Jan 23, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    There are several noticeable sepulchers and grave slabs in that church. One grave slab belongs to medieval monk and second belongs to a lady died in mid of XVI century. The most remarkable sepulcher belongs to Henry du Val Count of Dampierre and Baron of Hans born in 1580 and killed in the battle of Pressburg (now Bratislava, Slovakia) on October 9, 1620. I believe this Gentleman was Walloon or French speaking Fleming that’s why he was the subject of Holy Roman Emperor and become Imperialist General-Veldt-Wachtmeister (Lieutenant General) and member of the Army Council (Hofkriegs-Rat). He was prominent participant of early stage of the Thirty Years War (1618-1648) also known as Bohemian War.
    Admission is free but any donations are welcomed and highly appreaciated.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flashlight and tripod.
    Hours:
    Summer 08:00 - 18:00
    Winter 08:00 - 17:00

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    "The Last Supper" in Vienna

    by Jefie Written Dec 24, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Minoritenkirche in Vienna
    4 more images

    Minoritenkirche dates back to the 14th century, although the site on which it was built was officially given to the Minor Friars in 1224. These monks were followers of St. Francis of Assissi, and to this day the church remains closely linked to the Italian community of Vienna. The church is mostly famous for its mosaic reproduction of Leonardo da Vinci's "The Last Supper", which was originally commissioned by Napoleon, but as it had not been completed by the time Napoleon was defeated at Waterloo, it was eventually bought by the Habsburgs. The church also features other interesting art work, such as the beautiful stained glass window located on the wall behind the organ. Minoritenkirche is also known for being featured in one of the watercolours Adolf Hilter painted during his years in Vienna.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Minoritenkirche

    by croisbeauty Updated Sep 5, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Minoritenkirche
    4 more images

    To be honest, never before I have seen such a church building, to me it looks alike construction composed of several different buildings put together.
    The church is strongly connected with the Minoriten - Franciscans monks who appointed in Vienna in 1224. The construction of the church started in 1276, in French Gothic style, and was completely finished in 1350. The masters who built the church are unknown, however, it is commonly attributed to Jacobus Parisiensis. The building follows the pattern of the French Cathedral architecture.
    The top of it's bell tower was damaged during Austro - Turkish war, rebuilt and then again destroyed in another war. Finaly the top was then replaced by a flat roof.
    Later on the church become Italian National Church and was named Santa Maria Maggiore.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Roadquill's Profile Photo

    Minoriten Church

    by Roadquill Updated Jul 28, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    Built starting in 1784, the rock like finish is in stark contrast to the gothic churches that abound in Vienna. The arched walkway on one side is very interesting. There was on other photographer waiting for the light to reach a certian point.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Photography
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • gubbi1's Profile Photo

    Minoritenkirche - Italian National Church

    by gubbi1 Written Jun 19, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Minoritenkirche, Vienna, AT
    4 more images

    During my visit in Vienna I passed by the gothic Minoritenkirche several times and liked the architecture with the arcades and the light brown limestone very much.
    In the arcades you will find several tomb stones and reliefs collected for the interested visitor. Inside the church you will notice that it feels much larger here than when looking at it from the outside.
    Have a look at the walls were you will find several paintings and a huge picture of the last supper. This is an exact copy of the famous painting of Leonardo da Vinci. Don't think it is painted, but it is a mosaic of very tiny parts. It has the size of 9,18 meters in width and 4,47 meters in height.
    In the corner of the church you will find a chapel.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Minoriten Church

    by nicolaitan Updated Mar 28, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    This French style gothic church dominates the Minoritenplatz near the Hofburg and receives its name from the Minorite Franciscan monks who first came to Vienna in 1224. The first major building was constructed between 1276-1350 begun under the rule of King Ottokar of Bohemia. His death on the battlefield of Marchfield Plain led to Habsburg rule which lasted till WWI. This first Habsburg and many of his successors wavered between Baroque and Gothic architecture, with intervening reconstructions after the first and second Turkish sieges. The flat-top on the truncated tower was placed after it was destroyed during the siege of 1529, making for a unique hexagonal structure with nothing on top.
    In 1782 Emperor Joseph II threw the Minorites and many other religious orders out of Vienna for fear they had become to powerful for him to control, using the excuse that they did not teach or treat the sick and invited the Italian community to take over the church. He also returned the church to its original gothic appearance removing all the frippery. It was renamed The Italian National Church of Mary of the Snow ( Santa Maria Maggiore ), its official name even today, but Minoriten church is the commonly used name.

    The most famous attraction in Minoriten is the Last Supper mosaic commissioned by Napoleon to the Roman artist Giacomo Raffaelli in 1806. 9 x 4.5 m in size, it weighs 40000 lbs and is notable for the extremely bright colors and backgrounds, almost a parody of da Vinci. Napoleon originally wanted it for the Belvedere Palace, but it was too large and became the property of Emperor Franz II after Napoleon's fall. The high altar depicts Madonna of the Snow.

    Adolf Hitler entertained early thoughts of becoming a painter. What is considered his best effort is a 1910 water color of the Minoriten Church.

    Was this review helpful?

  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    Minoritenkirche

    by filipdebont Updated Jan 5, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Minoriten Church
    4 more images

    Day 2 : Ringstrasse

    Halfway the Bankgasse (with its beautiful Palaces), I followed a small street towards the Minoritenplatz wwhere I visited the Minoriten kirche (church).

    On this Minoriten platz there also are some beautiful Palaces, like the Dietrichstein Palace which dates from 1755. This Palace houses the offices of the Federal Chancellor and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

    In the middle of this square there is the Minoriten kirche (church). This old church was founded around 1244 by the order of the Minorites, but this Gothic building dates from 1339.

    The clock tower has a remarkable pyramid shape, during the Turkish siege in 1529; the original tower was shot down.

    Around 1780 this church was rebuild in its Gothic style, and given to the Italian community in Vienna by Joseph II.

    However that this church does not looks very big from the outside, it wasreally surprising to see how big it is from the inside.

    The interior looks very bright and there are some beautiful pieces of art, like the Mosaic copy of the Last Supper made by Leonardo de Vinci.

    This Masterpiece was made by Giacomo Raffaeli in command of Napoleon. Napoleon gave this command, as he wanted to replace the original painting in Milan by this piece, and the original had to move to Paris, France. After the defeat of Napoleon in 1815, the Habsburgs bought this piece of art from Raffaeli.

    There is also a small St Antonius Chapel.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Vienna

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

88 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Minoritenkirche - Church of the Minoriti
4.5 out of 5 stars
242 Opinions
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.5 out of 5 stars
373 Opinions
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
200 Opinions
0.2 miles away
Show Prices

View all Vienna hotels