Oper - Staatsoper, Vienna

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  • georeiser's Profile Photo

    Vienna Opera House

    by georeiser Written Apr 23, 2009
    Vienna Opera House
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    Vienna Opera House (Wiener Staatsoper) is located in the city centre, where the pedestrian area starts. The beautiful building was build in 1869, heavily bombed during World War II, and then rebuilt ten years later.

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    Wiener Staatsoper

    by Rupanworld Written Nov 3, 2008

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    It is the State Opera house of Vienna. During my visit to Vienna, it was under construction and hence I do not have a nicer picture. It is built between 1861 and 1869 by architects Eduard van der Nüll and August von Siccardsburg for Emperor Franz Josef I and has ever since occupied a special position in people's hearts. The first performance here was opera Don Giovanni by Mozart in May 1869. Initially the design of the building was so criticised that architect Van der Nüll committed suicide and the other architect von Siccardsburg died of a heart attack few weeks later. The building was heavily bombed during World War II. Ten years later the opera was reopened after birth of the Austrian state.

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    Opera House

    by BruceDunning Updated Sep 21, 2008

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    side view of Baroque style

    Right in the middle of the Ring, this is one of the most famous. The building was completed in 1869. It still has many operas and the inside is worth a tour, or take in an opera. You can stand in the back for a smaller charge and only stay one hour. Mozart moved here to get away from the shun by the king in Salzburg he was getting and the money was being cutback so he could not sustain his livelihood. While in Vienna he composed many pieces of the total of 100 since he first started at age 9.

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    Staatsoper (State Opera House)

    by Dabs Updated Jun 29, 2008

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    State Opera House

    The architects for State Opera House were chosen from an international contest to replace the old opera house. The architects selected were Eduard van der Nüll and August Sicard von Sicardsburg both of whom died in 1868 before the opera house was opened in 1869, van der Null committed suicide after the building was severely criticized after it's unveiling. The opera house suffered great damage in WWII but was restored and reopened in 1955, faithful to it's original design.

    I thought it was one of the most impressive buildings in Vienna and that's saying a lot with the remarkable architecture throughout the city.

    We didn't visit the interior but even if you don't have a chance to see a performance here, you can take a guided tour in multiple languages if you just want to see the interior or visit the Opera Museum.

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  • Wiener Staatsoper - types of tickets

    by verliebtinwien Updated Apr 20, 2008

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    The tickets at the Vienna opera seem frightingly expensive to many tourists, yet it is in many cases more complicated than necessarily expensive. The range of tickets is from approx 200 euros down to 2 euros! The two lower categories for seats are at approx 25 euros and 9 euros but at least the 9 euros tickets have partially or fully restricted view. If you buy a 9 euros "Loge" ticket you may however be so lucky that the ones who bought the more expensive tickets don't show up and you can take their seats as you wish! Just remember to dress up properly, ie. suit and tie for men, skirt or dress for women!

    If you prefer an even cheaper option, go for the standing ticket. They are ridiculously cheap, 2 euros, but are only sold 80 minutes before the start of the performance. Make sure you queue up minimum 2 hours before though (2 hours before the performance) as these tickets are very popular among students and music lovers! You have to go to a special counter called Abendkassa (meaning "evening counter"). The real trick of the standing ticket is that you've got to have really good legs and a healthy back if Wagner is your hero, his operas are ... well, lengthy. The other trick is that you need a scarf or a tie. Yes, it sounds weird, but it works like this that you actually reserve the spot you like within the standing area with your scarf or tie. You may sit down if you like, but then you won't see anything. I doubt you are allowed to bring a camping chair.

    Now, a third option is to take a risk and see if there are any unsold tickets left. They start selling those for half the price (e.g. approx 93 euros for the most expensive ones) one hour before the performance begins. Again, "Abendkassa" in the foyer is the place to go.

    If you open the seating plan on www.staatsoper.at you only get the German version. Still it is quite informative. The seats with restricted view are marked with a diagonal line, the standing area is marked with Stehplätze. Here you can see how much you would have to pay for which seats. You will also get a pretty good overview if you try to buy tickets online. The reduced tickets and standing tickets can't be bought online though.

    Enjoy!

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    Standing-room at the State-opera's performances

    by WStat Written Apr 20, 2008

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    State-Opera Vienna

    Hi,

    nice to welcome you soon here in Vienna!
    As to your questions: the standing-room (for about 450 people) is generally situated behind the seats on the operas ground-floor ("Parterre"), called "Steh- (-standing-)parterre", some also at the "Balcony" as well as at the "Gallery".Tickets are sold only 80 minutes in advance at the State-Opera's box-office.
    There is a "community" of people, who try to go whenever possible,the more famous the singers, the earlier they line up, sometimes even at the evening before the performance. So "first come, first serve" is a common issue.
    If you would savor the performance as a music-lover, it is up to your personal abilities, if you are really able to "stand" the whole evening. On the other hand - opera seats are unfortunately very expensive.
    Whatever you decide, have a nice evening at the Vienna Opera and here in Vienna!
    Greetings!

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    Party like a Royal at the Vienna Opera House

    by lizzie1715 Written Mar 23, 2008

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    The tour of the Opera House also included a look at the Royal Box and more interestingly we looked at the Private tea room behind the Royal Box. Apparently Royalty and VIP's used this tea room to guarantee them privacy during intermission. So, since there is no Royalty in Austria, anyone can rent this room now. I can't remember the cost, but I do remember thinking that split between a large group it is possible to do, although a huge indulgence. The room is beautifully decorated, it's very impressive. It's easy to imagine what it must have been like, seeped in history as it is.

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    Lovely Opera House

    by lizzie1715 Updated Mar 23, 2008

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    The Vienna Opera House is a very interesting Opera House, totally different to the Sydney or Paris Opera Houses. We took a morning tour with an English speaking tour guide and this was great because we learned some very interesting facts about it. Work commenced on the building in 1861 and was completed in 1869, following plans drawn up by architects August Sicard von Sicardsburg and Eduard van der Nüll. However the public response was not initially very favourable and Van der Nüll committed suicide, and barely ten weeks later Sicardsburg suffered a fatal heart attack so neither architect saw the completion of the building.

    In 1945 American bombardment destroyed a large part of the Opera House. It was rebuilt following the war.

    The main auitorium has 1700 seats. The stage is massive and it was very interesting to go backstage and see how huge the stage actually is. Definately worth a visit

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    Flight of the Valkyrie

    by Poznick Updated Feb 23, 2008

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    While standing room tickets for the opera are cheap (1-3 euros) and well positioned, they leave something to be desired by way of comfort. Consider before you buy, that operas are on the longish side (we are talking like 3-6 hours of standing) and the cheap seats are also the crowded seats so be prepared to fight for your right to opera. Not to mention that operas in general are pretty ridiculous. That being said, its all worth it when the main title song booms into the room at the start of the third act, its like Apocalypse Now all over again.

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    Staatsopera

    by Nikolay_Ivanov Written Jan 30, 2008

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    The normal price of a ticket for the Opera is 45-50 euro at least. You can buy a ticket for the standing area for 2- 3.50 euro. To buy such a ticket, you have to be there 2 hours before the opera start.

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    The world's most famous Opera house

    by Pavlik_NL Updated Nov 20, 2007

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    Side wing of the magnificent Vienna Opera house
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    Every first day of every year, this building is the centre of attention in Europe. Here the New Year's concerts is broadcasted over every country in Europe, a tradition that already lasts several decaded. The opera is a magnificent building that on the inside makes your had spin of beauty. The ceiling, the lamps, the balconies, the fine decorated walls ... it's a joy for the eyes. At the entrance (and on several places with the city centre) one can try to obtain tickets for a concert or play in the opera. Something that will guarantee you a extremely special evening.

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    Staatsoper

    by Anil_sss Updated Jul 25, 2007

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    Vienna is a city that lives with arts especially with the classical music and the operas. So everbody has to buy a classical music cd from the Virgin Records music shop on Kaerntner Strasse or go to an opera at staatsoper.

    Although there is an opera at the staatsoper every night, you may have a problem to find a ticket because all the tickets are sold very quickly.

    But you always have a chance to find tickets from the blackmarket. And it’s so easy to find these guys, they always hang out near the staatsoper all day and they whisper to you and ask if you want a ticket or not.

    I also have to add that the tickets are very expensive. I paid 40 Euros for a ticket at the 2 nd floor balcony and I can only see the half of the stage from my seat.

    If you don’t want to spend much money, you have another option. There are different zones for the cheap tickets. These tickets costs between 2-5 Euros and you don’t have a seat, you have to stand ! The hardest part is; if the opera starts at 21.00, you have to stand and wait on a long queue to get in at 18.00

    If you have money or not, or if you have to stand or sit, it doesn’t matter don’t miss this unforgettable event.

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    Go to the Opera!

    by monkeytrousers Written Jul 20, 2007

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    I thoroughly recommend that everyone who visits Vienna sets an evening site to go to the opera at the state opera house which is argueably the most important music venue in Europe.

    There are performances on nearly everyday and tickets are really cheap. You can get seating tickets a couple of months in advance for as little as 9 euros from the website below or you can que up at get standing tickets a couple of hours before the performance starts for anywhere between 2 and 6 euros. Even if you dont like opera you are not spending much just to have a look around and see inside the place.

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    Vienna State Opera

    by call_me_rhia Updated May 27, 2007

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    Vienna State Opera

    The Vienna State Opera is one of the best opera houses in the world, with big names often singing or dancing there – when I visited it was Placido Domingo’s turn… of course tickets had sold out ages before. Everyone who counts has worked there, from Mahler to Abbado, with Strauss and von Karajan in between

    The building, which can be visited on a guided tour, was built between 1863 and 1869 by the architects August Sicard von Sicardsburg and Eduard van der Nüll. It’s the place where, once a year, the Vienna Opera Ball is held. Most people will know of it: it is the famous (infamous?) ball of the debutantes.

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    Visit the State Opera House (Wiener Staatsoper)

    by longsanborn Updated Apr 17, 2007

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    Vienna State Opera House at night
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    The Vienna Opera House is one of the famous opera houses in the world. The Vienna Opera House is well-known as having first-class opera performances and for its Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. For 300 days a year, the Vienna State Opera offers a program that changes daily: more than 60 operas and ballets during the year.

    The Vienna State Opera was built between 1863 and 1869 as one of the first great monuments of the new Ring Boulevard. The Royal-Imperial Court Opera Theater, as it was first called, was designed by the architects August Sicard von Sicardsburg and Eduard van der Nüll. The building closely resembles Italian Renaissance, as this epoch was immensely important for art and music. Numerous statues at the inside and outside of Vienna opera underline the festive character of the house.

    Once a year, the stage and orchestra stalls of the Vienna State Opera turn into a giant dance floor for the Vienna Opera Ball. More than a 100 debutante couples in long evening dress and tailcoats open the ball in the presence of the Austrian Federal President.

    I've only been twice in the Opera House; the first time there, I joined a group tour to see the inside of the Opera House, and the 2nd time was to watch the Swan Lake Ballet performance.

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