Oper - Staatsoper, Vienna

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Opera live and free on the square.

    by breughel Written Aug 8, 2012

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    Opera live and free on the square.
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    One should know that In April, May, June and September, around 150 opera and ballet performances are screened live in front of the opera building on a 50 m² screen. There are seats on the Herbert-von-Karajan-Platz and it is free.
    Furthermore the sound is very good and you see more from what happens on the stage than many of the spectators inside.

    Each evening after dinner we had a walk to the Opera and stayed some time in front of the screen depending on the interest of the opera or ballet on show. The program is different every day and in the same way that every symphony or sonata is not a highlight of the classical music, not every opera is a summit of the lyric art (I hope Nemorino will agree!).

    The disadvantage of this Opera show on the square is that all seats are occupied when it is nice weather and they are empty but wet when it rains. "On ne peut avoir le beurre et l'argent du beurre"; this is not an opera from Bizet just a French saying!
    We saw a ballet "Don Quichotte" from Marius Petipa, music by Léon Minkus created at the Bolchoï Theater in 1869 (see my videos). I fancy ballet dancers (female) so that I was much pleased to be in Vienna on the day of this performance.
    We saw also part of Donizetti's opera "Roberto Devereux" but that was less amusing.
    The Staatsoper Wien was part of our evening walk from Stephansdom over the Kärntnerstrasse to the Ring and we keep a nice souvenir of it.

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    A NIGHT AT THE OPERA

    by themajor Updated Aug 14, 2005

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    HIGH C's AND HIGH CEILINGS!

    There's no doubt about it, Vienna will always be associated with some of the finest music in the world and although I do have a soft spot for Falco's 'Rock me Amadeus', I am of course mainly referring to classical music.

    For any music lover, a trip to see an opera or ballet performance at the Staatsoper is a must and it really needn't cost the earth. On the one hand you can go bonkers and splash out as I did by treating yourself to the best seats in the house. This might seem rather much when you learn that you will pay out £100 + per seat, but take into consideration that your accompanying children can sit anywhere in the House for about £10, and you're talking about a truly memorable experience. My children (Then aged 10 and 12) loved it but do choose your piece carefully. Something like Offenbach's 'Tales of Hoffman' is a splendid introduction to Grand Opera, and the Vienna State Opera have a superb production that's reappearing in 2005. Oh, and I should mention that on the back of each seat the person behind you can read a multilingual translation device...and it really does work well.

    If you aren't feeling flush - don't panic! Seats can still be had for as little as 9 euros but do try to book ahead irrespective of the price band you go for. Online and telephone booking is a doddle - the box office personnel's command of English when dealing with the wary foreigner puts us to shame! Do try to go dressed accordingly - you dont have to come adorned in evening dress (though some do) but jeans and t-shirts would obviously be frowned on. If you can't spare the time for a performance or don't like the music then you could of course bypass the lot and join one of the regular daily tours of the building. But be brave - you'll love it!

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    THE OPERA HOUSE (Staatsoper)

    by Hosell Updated Oct 8, 2004

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    If you'll walk by the ring the way I did,so you must to start in the Opera House.This impressive building was built in Reinassance style and is one of oldest buildings in the ring and the center of Vienna.It was completly destroyed during the second world war,and then reconstruction work took the opportunity to modernise the building.The Vienna Opera House was reopened in 1.955 and right now is one of most importants in the world.

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    Staatsoper. The magic world of culture

    by Fam.Rauca Updated Sep 8, 2005

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    State Opera House
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    The Opera House was built in 1862 and was the first building constructed in the Ring.
    The architects, August von Siccardsburg and Eduard van der Nüll created the Opera House in the French Renaissance style but were bitterly criticised.
    When the Opera House was opened in 1869 with Mozart's "Don Giovanni,“ the two architects were already dead.
    Following a bombardment in 1945 the theatre was completely destroyed by flames.
    The reconstruction lasted ten years: Erich Boltenstern designed the stalls and the staircases whilst Zeno Kosak designed the hall.
    The iron curtain depicting Orpheus and Eurydice is the work of Rudolf Eisenmenger.
    On 5th November 1955 the Opera House was reopened, in a solemn ceremony, and a performance of Beethoven’s “Fiedelio” was given, conducted by Karl Böhm.
    The opera orchestra is made up of members of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra.
    In addition it has its own State Opera House Corps de Ballet.
    A list of its orchestra conductors alone would be enough to attest to its worldwide reputation:
    Gustav Mahler, Richard Strauss, Furtwängler, Böhm, Herbert von Karajan, Maazel and Abbado.

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    Sorry, Schoenberg

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Oct 13, 2006

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    Vienna's Staatsoper

    Plan ahead! well ahead!!! if a visit to Vienna's Staatsoper is on your agenda. We didn't, and by the time we got around to it, the only opera tickets available for the nights we had free in Vienna were for Schoenerg's difficult and seldom-performed "Moses und Aron". We decided we'd give it a miss this time and planned to take a take a tour of the Opera House instead. We left that to our last day ... and then found there were no tours that day. Oops! Next time.....

    The tour is definitely worth it - I'd done it years ago on my first visit to Vienna and still have memories, though no photos any more, of the splendid interior. That tour included the backstage area, not all do, so check the website or the box office before you book if that area interests you.

    Even if a tour doesn't interest you, and a performance of opera isn't your idea of a good night out, do take a look at the building. Built in Renaissance Italianate style, it first opened its door in 1869 with a performance of Mozart's brilliant Don Giovanni. At this stage it was by no means as universally admired as it came to be. WWII saw it much of it destroyed, though the foyer, grand staicase and tea room did survive. By then, the building had become such a symbol of the city that it was rebuilt according to the original plans, albeit with the latest technology installed, and reopened on November 5, 1955, this time with Beethoven's incomparable Fidelio.

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    Staatsoper / the opera

    by globetrott Updated Jul 30, 2012

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    the foyer of Staatsoper in Wien
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    The Oper was the first building of the new Ringstrasse that was finished in 1869, and while not everybody was happy with the style of the building at that time it finally became one of the most popular buildings of Vienna in our time. In case that you intend to see one of the performances in the Opera, just make sure to reserve as long in advance, as possible, otherwise you have to get your tickets at one of the several ticket-bureaus, adding high extra-charges to the ticket-prices.
    As soon as you arrive in Vienna, you may as well take a look at the side-entrance opposite of "Ringstrassen-Gallerien" - there you see a seperate entrance, where you may see, at what dates guided tours through the opera are offered. - it does NOT follow a regular schema, but the dates of the next few weeks are posted there. Be there in time, these tours are made by plenty of tourguides in various languages, rushing through thousands of tourists within a short time...

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    Opern-toilette & Toilet-Bar

    by globetrott Updated Jul 30, 2012

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    the entrance of Opern-toilette
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    Opern-Toilette is a funny place, right under the Opera. It was constructed some years ago and recently the so-called "Toilet-Bar" was added. It is a pissoir, designed by the artist Rudolf Scheffel and includes a Jazz-piano and 4 hungry lips, waiting untill you p*ss off....
    Just Imagine, you walk through the lovely centre of Vienna, and get the idea or need, you want to powder your nose or to talk to a man about a horse...
    There is a place, where you may do that in the apropriate way, you certainly expect to, in the metropole of classical music and good taste !
    Ladies go ahead, through the big stage' curtain !
    Gents go to the right please !
    There is a small entrance fee of 60 cents
    to be paid into a machine at the entrance.
    And believe me : It's worth every cent !
    I don't know much about the ladies tones,
    when they powder their noses,
    but at the men's department strange tones are not unusual
    while talking to a man about a horse or a dog !
    ...and therefore Opera-music is played there in order to
    get a more cultural "touch" into any discussion about horses...
    Just imagine - Luciano Pavarotti is singing TOSCA
    in the real Opera high above you,
    while you may talk to a man about a horse...
    and you may sit in one of these well-furnished boxes
    and may go to the John
    and nobody could blame you for that !!!
    Just try to do the same in the real Opera's boxes and you will see what happens ...

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Staatsoper (State Opera House)

    by Dabs Updated Jun 29, 2008

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    State Opera House

    The architects for State Opera House were chosen from an international contest to replace the old opera house. The architects selected were Eduard van der Nüll and August Sicard von Sicardsburg both of whom died in 1868 before the opera house was opened in 1869, van der Null committed suicide after the building was severely criticized after it's unveiling. The opera house suffered great damage in WWII but was restored and reopened in 1955, faithful to it's original design.

    I thought it was one of the most impressive buildings in Vienna and that's saying a lot with the remarkable architecture throughout the city.

    We didn't visit the interior but even if you don't have a chance to see a performance here, you can take a guided tour in multiple languages if you just want to see the interior or visit the Opera Museum.

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    Wiener Staatsoper

    by Penelope4 Updated Jul 3, 2011

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    Vienna is known for classical music, gardens, parks, castles, museums aside - er- from coffee shops and domestic politics. Only the best musicians perform at the Wiener Staatsoper.

    If you would like to make your visit memorable, bring a formal dress/suit with you (a simple black dress for a woman can be worn to parties, concerts). Formal attire is worn by locals they go enjoy classical music. Like in many highly respected concert halls, you will not be allowed to enter if you come late and may only do so during the break.

    You can buy tickets online. In many cases, the low-priced seats are sold out. You may take wish to buy the available tickets directly at the site hours before hand or buy from shops which sell them.

    Tickets can be bought from the Wien Staatsoper (in summer 2009)
    starting 17 August
    Monday thru Friday - between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m.
    Saturdays: between 9 a.m. and 12 p.m.
    closed on Sundays

    or in

    Operngasse 2, 1010 Wien:

    Opening hours of ticket booths from July 1 to August 15:
    Monday thru Friday - between 10 am and 2 pm
    Closed on Saturday, Sunday and holidays

    Starting 16 August
    Monday thru Friday: between 8 am and 6 pm
    Saturdays and Sundays: between 9 am and 12 p.m.

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  • Wiener Staatsoper - types of tickets

    by verliebtinwien Updated Apr 20, 2008

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    The tickets at the Vienna opera seem frightingly expensive to many tourists, yet it is in many cases more complicated than necessarily expensive. The range of tickets is from approx 200 euros down to 2 euros! The two lower categories for seats are at approx 25 euros and 9 euros but at least the 9 euros tickets have partially or fully restricted view. If you buy a 9 euros "Loge" ticket you may however be so lucky that the ones who bought the more expensive tickets don't show up and you can take their seats as you wish! Just remember to dress up properly, ie. suit and tie for men, skirt or dress for women!

    If you prefer an even cheaper option, go for the standing ticket. They are ridiculously cheap, 2 euros, but are only sold 80 minutes before the start of the performance. Make sure you queue up minimum 2 hours before though (2 hours before the performance) as these tickets are very popular among students and music lovers! You have to go to a special counter called Abendkassa (meaning "evening counter"). The real trick of the standing ticket is that you've got to have really good legs and a healthy back if Wagner is your hero, his operas are ... well, lengthy. The other trick is that you need a scarf or a tie. Yes, it sounds weird, but it works like this that you actually reserve the spot you like within the standing area with your scarf or tie. You may sit down if you like, but then you won't see anything. I doubt you are allowed to bring a camping chair.

    Now, a third option is to take a risk and see if there are any unsold tickets left. They start selling those for half the price (e.g. approx 93 euros for the most expensive ones) one hour before the performance begins. Again, "Abendkassa" in the foyer is the place to go.

    If you open the seating plan on www.staatsoper.at you only get the German version. Still it is quite informative. The seats with restricted view are marked with a diagonal line, the standing area is marked with Stehplätze. Here you can see how much you would have to pay for which seats. You will also get a pretty good overview if you try to buy tickets online. The reduced tickets and standing tickets can't be bought online though.

    Enjoy!

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    Staatsoper

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Apr 16, 2005

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    Staatsoper

    Staatsopera is one of the most famous lyric theatres to the world. The huge building was erected in neorinascimental style from E.Van Der Null and T.Von Siccardsburg in 1861-1869. The construction was so criticized from the inhabitants that nobody of the two architects saw the inauguration (happened 15 May 1869 with the "Don Giovanni" of Mozart): Van Der Null killed himself in the beginning of 1868 and two months after died Von Siccardsburg. The theatre was nearly destroyed at all from the aerial strafings of 1945, it has been reconstructed and reopened in 1955. The facade is adorned of statues in the advanced arched. The thetre insiade is able of 2209 places, the reduced ones, they are adorns with mosaics and tapestries.

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    Standing-room at the State-opera's performances

    by WStat Written Apr 20, 2008

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    State-Opera Vienna

    Hi,

    nice to welcome you soon here in Vienna!
    As to your questions: the standing-room (for about 450 people) is generally situated behind the seats on the operas ground-floor ("Parterre"), called "Steh- (-standing-)parterre", some also at the "Balcony" as well as at the "Gallery".Tickets are sold only 80 minutes in advance at the State-Opera's box-office.
    There is a "community" of people, who try to go whenever possible,the more famous the singers, the earlier they line up, sometimes even at the evening before the performance. So "first come, first serve" is a common issue.
    If you would savor the performance as a music-lover, it is up to your personal abilities, if you are really able to "stand" the whole evening. On the other hand - opera seats are unfortunately very expensive.
    Whatever you decide, have a nice evening at the Vienna Opera and here in Vienna!
    Greetings!

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    City of Culture

    by Jmill42 Written Mar 17, 2004

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    My Opera Flier!

    With one of the best opera houses in the world, you must see an opera in Vienna! On my first day in Vienna, I happened to be walking back to my hostel, and passed by the Staatsoper. There was a line forming and I wandered over to see what was going on. With a little nosing around, I would out that the line was for standing room only tickets to see Le nozze di Figaro!! I, of course, jumped in line and waited the hour or so until seating occurred. For 3 Euro, I got to see Figaro!! Unbelievable!!

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    Staatsoper

    by Jmill42 Updated Mar 17, 2004

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    The Staatsoper

    The Staatsoper is one of the most famous opera houses in the world. Operaists vie for positions here and once they obtain a spot, they rarely leave. The Viennese truly support their arts, and the reception that the opera singers receive is amazing.

    The first version of the Staatsoper, was completed in May of 1869, and was done under the order of Franz Josef. This survived until WWII, when the opera house was destroyed.

    After much bickering about what the new finished product should look like, the current version, as it stands today, was opened on the 5th of November 1955.

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    Opera House

    by ruki Updated Sep 17, 2009

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    If you go via Ring strase your first stop probably will be Opera. Vienna opera is the world most famous and if you are Mozart's or Strauss fun you must visit and feel the magic world of music. This state opera offers a program that change daily: more than 60 operas and ballets during the year. The Opera House was built in 1862 and was the first building constructed in the Ring.

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