Schonbrunn, Vienna

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the summer-residence of the emperor

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  • Looking at the palace and Great Parterre
    Looking at the palace and Great Parterre
    by Jefie
  • Schonbrunn
    by plavajabuka
  • Schonbrunn
    Schonbrunn
    by kris-t
  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Climb Gloriette Hill

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 23, 2014

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    Mr. and Mrs. go for a Sunday walk
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    When visiting the park of Schönbrunn palace, don’t miss the climb up Gloriette hill. Unless your walking abilities forbid this walk, that is, of course. The hill is steep but the paths zigzag up, so it isn’t as bad as it seems from below, although still something. Watch how the view over the park and the palace opens up during the climb and reveals the panorama of parts of the city with the chain of the Viennese forest in the background.

    Gloriette is a structure on top of the hill at the far end of Schönbrunn park. Shaped like a triumphant arch, its sole purpose is serving as a lookout and viewpoint. The middle pavillon contains a café in case you need a rest.

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  • plavajabuka's Profile Photo

    From: So ein schöner Brunnen to Schönbrunn

    by plavajabuka Updated Jan 17, 2014

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    Explore the palace, gardens and the ZOO, better from April to October, later gardens are not so attractive.
    After it, if you still have energy, you can simply walk long the Mariahilfer Straße( a shopping area) between the Palace and the Innere Stadt( Museums Quartier Subway Station )

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Schonbrunn palace

    by Raimix Updated Nov 5, 2013

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    I knew that it is very famous Vienna place before my first visit to Vienna. Pity, but we haven't visited it for first time, instead it was chosen to visit Prater park, so more than half of excursion group were children.

    I finally visited it during my second stay and it was great experience. Palace was built in Baroque - Roccoco style in around the middle of 17th century. It was a summer residence of the Empire.

    Nowadays is it inscribed into UNESCO World Heritage list for its high importance, palace houses collections of art. It is great looking park around with fake Roman ruins, belvedere tower, Neptune fountain, many squirrels.

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    Schönbrunn Palace

    by ValbyDK Written Sep 13, 2013

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    Sch��nbrunn Palace
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    Schönbrunn Palace – located about 6 kilometers from the centre of Vienna – is the former imperial summer residence. The site of the palace was once the home of a hunting lodge, but it was destroyed by the Turks in 1694. Emperor Leopold I decided to built a new palace on the spot, and Schönbrunn Palace (meaning "beautiful spring") was finished in the end of the 18th century (during the reign of Maria Theresien).

    Today, the palace is one of the major tourist attractions in Vienna, and huge... The palace is 175 meters wide and there are 1,441 rooms in the palace complex. A few of the rooms are now open for visitors, including some of the rooms of Emperor Franz Joseph and Elisabeth (Sissi), and all rooms are beautiful decorated in Rococo style.

    Behind the palace is the garden and the park. Here are flowerbeds, statues, obelisks, the Neptun Fountain, the Gloriette (an arcade on top of the Schönbrunn Hill), and much more. I ran out of time when I visited the palace, and only had time to walk up to the Neptun Fountain. The garden and park is also huge!

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Imperial gardens at Schönbrunn

    by Jefie Updated Jan 6, 2013

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    The Gloriette seen from the Grand Parterre
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    A visit to Schönbrunn wouldn't be complete without a walk around its lovely grounds, which have actually been open to the public since 1779. Empress Maria Teresa was largely responsible for having the gardens landscaped into their present form duringthe second half of the 18th century. They aren't as big as those at Versailles, but they do offer a nice variety of attractions, including a maze, a small zoo (which happens to be the oldest zoo in the world), a rose garden, a Japanese garden, an obelisk, some (fake) Roman ruins, and an old palm house built to grow exotic plants. The area that stretches in front of the palace is called the Great Parterre, and it leads to the beautiful Neptune Fountain. Another important feature of the Schönbrunn gardens is the Gloriette built in 1775 on top of the hill that faces the palace. It houses a small cafe and you can get a beautiful view of the palace and surrounding grounds from its rooftop terrace.

    The gardens are open to visitors free of charge every day of the year (check the website for opening hours), although there are some extra fees charged to see some of the attractions (maze, palm house, Gloriette terrace). The Vienna zoo is also operated separately from the palace (see http://www.zoovienna.at/en/zoo-and-visitors/welcome-worlds-oldest-zoo/)

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Imperial appartments at Schönbrunn Palace

    by Jefie Updated Jan 6, 2013

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    Sch��nbrunn Palace in Vienna, Austria
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    I know it's a cliche thing to say, but Schönbrunn is to Vienna what Versailles is to Paris :o) Back in the 16th century, the Imperial family acquired this piece of land located about 8 km away from Vienna, fenced it in, and for a long time it was used as recreation and hunting grounds by the Habsburgs. Schönbrunn Palace was then built in the mid-18th century and it became the official summer residence of the Imperial court (as opposed to Hofburg Palace, which was their winter residence). A total of 40 rooms are now open to the public, including the private appartments of Emperor Franz Joseph and those of his wife Elizabeth (Sissi). Unfortunately, pictures are not allowed inside the palace so I can't share with you all the beauty and splendor of the rooms decorated in a Rococo style - suffice it to say that they are worthy of the family that ruled over Austria for more than 600 years!

    Unless you're really pressed for time, you should definitely buy a ticket that allows you to go on the Grand Tour (you don'tget to see as much on the Imperial Tour). You can pay a bit more to go on a guided tour, but I thought the free audioguide was quite informative and easy to listen to. Schönbrunn Palace is open daily (check the website for opening hours) and tickets for the Grand Tour cost 13.50 Euros.

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  • goglobe's Profile Photo

    Serene Schonbrunn

    by goglobe Updated Jul 19, 2012

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    a palace of serene beauty

    Schonbrunn can be easily reached by metro. The yellow colour of the building pronounces the unique Habsburg brilliance in its era. The many rooms available for tourist visit have much to offer, including a couple of rooms with Chinese artefacts and the remarkable blue porcelain motifs. Be prepared to walk 15 minutes or so to the far end of the garden, where a magnificent white facade stands. Beyond that there are wooded areas where deers freely hop. There's also a large zoo and an orangery inside this summer palace as well.

    Indeed, this monument is so special that Andre Rieu has given numerous waltz concerts in the past years. He even fabricated a 1:1 replica which is taken to major cities of the world to impress audiences there. Truly impressive, I must say.

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    Schoenbrunn Palace

    by Airpunk Written Jul 10, 2012

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    Schoenbrunn Palace
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    Probably this is the sight you should pick if you have the chance to see one place in Vienna only. Schoenbrunn Palace, the most splendid castle of the late Habsburg monarchy, is the symbol of Viennese court life. The grounds were purchased in 1569, when the “Hofburg” in the city centre was still the residence of the Emperor. Schoenbrunn got its name from a beautiful fountain “Schoener Brunnen” which was once located on these grounds. The castle has its origins in the 17 th century, the current structure was completed during the reign of Empress Maria Theresia in the mid-18 th century. Most of Schloss Schoenbrunn was preserved in the state it had during the reign of its tow most famous inhabitants, Emperor Franz-Joseph and his wife Elizabeth, better known as “Sisi”. After the fall of the monarchy in 1918, it was turned into today's museum and became UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996 as one of the first sites in Austria.

    There are different tickets for access to the palace, each one permits access to different areas with a couple of combination possibilities. The gardens are accessible for free (with exception of the labyrinth), to see all accessible areas of the palace, you should plan around two hours. I spent more than half a day on the Schönbrunn grounds which included the tour of all accesible rooms in the palace and an extensive explorations of the gardens, the labyrinth and the Gloriette building (from which you have an excellent view over the city and the palace grounds) – without visits of other buildings such as the coach museum or the zoo. If you want to visit these as well, you should definitively plan a whole day.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Schonbrunn

    by kris-t Updated May 13, 2012

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    The Schönbrunn Palace (Schloss Schönbrunn) in Vienna is one of the most important cultural monuments in Austria and since the 1860s has also been one of the major tourist attractions in Vienna.

    In the year 1569 the Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian II purchased the Katterburg which was located on a large area between Meidling and Hietzing where today Schönbrunn's parks and different buildings are situated. He showed interest in the newly founded zoo, the Tiergarten Schönbrunn, and tried to establish not only a systematic maintenance of wild animals, but also a plantation of rare and exotic plants. He is justifiably called the creator of Schönbrunn's garden arrangement.

    After the downfall of the monarchy in 1918 the newly founded Austrian Republic became the owner of Schönbrunn Palace and preserved the beautiful rooms and chambers as a museum for the visitors.

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  • Ilney's Profile Photo

    A huge summer palace

    by Ilney Written Jul 12, 2011

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    Take the whole day to visit this palace. It is big and has lots of things to explore.
    The Habsburgs really knew how to leave with style. A magnificent and imponent summer residence.
    Diferent kind of tickets are available to visit this palace.
    Imperial tour: offers a panoramic view of the imperial life style and their destinations. It is the shortest and cheapest one.
    Grand tour: it covers the whole palace. It takes about 50 min.
    Classic pass: Grand tour plus prince's garden, Gloriette, labyrinth and Apfelstrudel show( here you learn how to make apfelstrudel, taste it and get the recipie )
    Gold pass: the classic pass plus all the gardens and the carriage museum

    From the Gloriette you can see a great view of Wien and the Stephanskirch.

    Read more: http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/152e5a/4e34c/#ixzz1Ru4bqPhP

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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Zoo Schönbrunn

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Jun 30, 2011

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    rattlesnake

    Located on the grounds of the Schönbrunn Palace, and one of the oldest zoos in Europe (founded by Empress Maria Theresia in the 18th century). Though some enclosures seem a little outdated, the integration of the historic features into the zoological garden is quite remarkable (just one example: a fake ruin in a bird-house). The rainforest house is especially interesting - with a very creepy bat tunnel.

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    Summer Royal Residence

    by ruki Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Without dabt it is the most famouse and the most beautiful spot in Vienna. You must take out hole day to see everything in Schonbrunn. There are amazing parks unique beauty. It is summer royal residence and the most important cultural monument in the city.
    Tickets for schonbrunn palace costs:
    Imperial tour (with 22 state rooms) EUR 9,5; Grand tour (with 40 state rooms) with guide 14,40 EUR
    Also you must visit Maze and Labyrinth, Privy Garden and the Gloriette viewing terrace. It is open daily from 9 am and it is cost 6,9 EUR (for all 3 attractions)
    There is also Schonbrunn Zoo and it is the worlds oldest and only baroque zoo.

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  • Peterodl's Profile Photo

    Schonbrunn Palace

    by Peterodl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Schonbrunn Palace
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    The grounds came into possession of Emperor Maximillion II in 1569. He started the gardens and the building of a royal residence which was added to by succeeding Emperors.
    In 1700, the palace that stands today was ready to be moved into and Empress Maria Theresa re-built and extended the palace between 1743 to 1763.
    Other features such as the Roman Ruins and the Obelisk Fountain were erected in 1777.

    The palace was taken over by the state of Austria after WWI and was thankfully preserved in it's Imperial glory for future generations to admire.

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  • desert_princess's Profile Photo

    Schönbrunn palace - the Neptune fountain

    by desert_princess Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Sch��nbrunn palace - the Neptune fountain
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    the Neptune fountain is situated right in front of you ,at the end if the flower carpets under the Gloriette. It seems to be operated by a computer that is in charge of the water jets - when I first saw it , it was working , the next moment - no water coming out of it. Go figure.....
    It was conceived as part of the overall design of the gardens and park commissioned by Maria Theresa in the 1770s.

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Schönbrunn

    by leffe3 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Schönbrunn Palace is one of the most important cultural monuments in Austria and, since the 1960s, has also been one of the major tourist attractions in Vienna. It was added to the UNESCO World Cultural Heritage List in 1996.

    It has a long history although what we see today is predominantly 18th century. Katterburg, as it was first known, was essentially a hunting lodge with extensive grounds. It had a series of owners who slowly expanded it until the estate came into the hands of the Habsburgs under Maximillian II in 1569. But it wasn't until 1642 that the estate began to significantly develop and the name changed to Schönbrunn (after the Schöne Brunnen or fair spring that flowed through the grounds) under the Dower Empress, Eleonora von Gonzaga who had a 'chateau de plaisance' built. Destroyed by the Turks in the 1683 Siege of Vienna, the estate passed into the hands of Emperor Leopold I. He commissioned Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach (Karlskirche) to design and build a splendid new residence, and the central body of the palace is the result, built in just 7 years and, by 1700, ready to be habitable. But wars resulted in work stopping and it wasn't until 1743 when Maria Theresa decided to make Schönbrunn the centre of court and political life and commissioned a complete rebuild and laying out of the formal gardens we see today. (There was one major change in 1817 when the elaborate Rococo decoration was removed from the façade, reducing it to much soberer forms with few decorative elements, and had the palace painted in 'Schönbrunn Yellow', giving it the characteristic appearance it still retains today.

    Inside is a celebration of the most excessive of rococo and baroque - a clash of colour, style and taste. OTT is an understatement!

    Opening Times (Palace)
    1st April - 30th June, 8.30am - 5pm: 1st July - 31st August, 8.30am - 6pm: 1st September- 31st October, 8.30am - 5pm:
    1st November - 31st March, 8.30am - 4.30pm

    Prices vary enormously - from 36.00€ to see everything to 2.00 € to see the garden.

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