Gent Off The Beaten Path

  • De Tap en de Tepel
    De Tap en de Tepel
    by HORSCHECK
  • Arts Centre Vooruit
    Arts Centre Vooruit
    by HORSCHECK
  • Arts Centre Vooruit: Inside the cafe
    Arts Centre Vooruit: Inside the cafe
    by HORSCHECK

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Gent

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    Graffiti Street

    by HORSCHECK Written Mar 1, 2014

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    On Sunday afternoon of my time in Gent I met the local VT members irisbe and wandeljp, who showed me some more off the beaten path places of Gent I hadn't seen before.

    Among these was the narrow pathway Werregarenstraat, which is also known as Graffiti Street It is one of the very few places in Belgium where graffiti is legal. So the appearance of this colourful street is constantly changing.

    Directions:
    The Graffiti Street (Werregarenstraat) is one of the small connecting streets between the streets Hoogpoort and Onderstraat in the heart of Gent's historic city centre.

    Graffiti Street: Happy VT members Graffiti Street Graffiti Street Graffiti Street: Werregaren Straat
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    Side trip to Brugge

    by HORSCHECK Updated Mar 1, 2014

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    Brugge is the capital of the province West Flanders and can easily be visited on a day trip from Gent. The distance between the two cities is less than 50 km and there is an at least hourly train connection serving this route.

    The city centre is dominated by a mix of canals and narrow cobbled streets. Beside many churches and historic buildings, the main sights include the medieval belfry at the market square, the 122,3 metres tall brickwork Church of our Lady as well as the 12th century Basilica of the Holy Blood.

    I actually stayed three nights in Brugge, whose old town is listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2000. Still I prefered Gent to Brugge, mainly due to the slightly less touristy atmosphere.

    Website: http://www.brugge.be/

    Brugge: Rozenhoedkaai and Belfry by night Brugge:  Typical canal buildings Brugge: Jan van Eyckplein Brugge: Typical historic city centre scene Brugge: Basilica of the Holy Blood ? Burg Square
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    The Book Tower

    by HORSCHECK Written Mar 1, 2014

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    The 64 metres tall Book Tower (Boekentoren) was completed in 1942 after the modernist designs of the Belgian architect Henry van de Velde.

    It belongs to the university library and is said to house approximately 3 million books or in other words 46 km of reading material.

    Directions:
    The Book Tower stands more or less on the highest point of Gent in the district of Blandijnberg. It can be found about 1 km south of the historic city centre.

    Address: Book Tower, Rozier 9, 9000 Ghent

    Website: http://www.boekentoren.be/

    Book Tower Book Tower Book Tower Book Tower description
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    Citadel Park

    by HORSCHECK Written Mar 1, 2014

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    The Citadel Park was designed for the 1913 World Exhibition, which took place in Gent. Its location is on the site of a former large scale-citadel.

    In the centre of the park stands the former Royal Casino, which nowadays is integrated in the building complex of the SMAK Museum (City Museum for Contemporary Art).

    The park is also home to numerous statues, sculptures and art projects. One of these is the Museum Graveyard (Musea Kerkhof) by Leo Copers. The artist placed the names of famous art museums on gravestones.

    Directions:
    The Citadel Park is situated about 1,5 km south of Gent's historic city centre, just east of the Sint-Pieters train station. The nearest tram stop is "Sint-Pieters", where line #1 stops.

    Citadel Park Citadel Park: Fighting tigers statue Citadel Park: Museum Graveyard Citadel Park:Former Casino building Citadel Park: Local bird life
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    Arts Centre Vooruit

    by HORSCHECK Written Mar 1, 2014

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    The Vooruit building was constructed between 1911 and 1914 after designs of Ferdinand Dierkens, who was also responsible for the Ons Huis and Bond Moyson Buildings at Gent's Vrijdagmarkt (Friday Market).

    The socialist building was used as a cultural meeting place for the working class. Since 1983 the building is a listed monument. Nowadays it is an Arts and Event Centre with a large Art Deco cafe at street level.

    Directions:
    The Arts Centre Vooruit can be found in the Kustenkwartier district, which is located just south of the historic city centre.

    Address: Arts Centre Vooruit, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 23, 9000 Gent

    Website: http://www.vooruit.be/

    Arts Centre Vooruit Arts Centre Vooruit Arts Centre Vooruit Arts Centre Vooruit: Inside the cafe Arts Centre Vooruit: Inside the cafe
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    De Tap en de Tepel

    by HORSCHECK Written Mar 1, 2014

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    As my Bed and Breakfast was located in the Prinsenhof area of Gent I came across the former "De Tap en de Tepel" building (Tap and Nipple) quite a few times.

    If it was early morning or late evening I almost always noticed a grey long haired man sitting inside at a big wooden table by the fire reading newspapers. As there were no cutains, I could see the interior, which looked quite antique, but somewhat comfortable and authentic.

    Later I learned from VT member wandeljp that this used to be an old commercial building, which was turned into a popular pub and bar. It was run by the grey haired man. Unfortunatelythe place closed a couple of years agao, but the man obviously still lived there.

    Directions:
    The "De Tap en de Tepel" building can be found in the cobbled street Gewand, in the Prinsenhof district of Gent's historic city centre. The nearest tram stop is Gravensteen, which is served by tram #1.

    Address: De Tap en de Tepel, Gewad 7, 9000 Gent

    De Tap en de Tepel De Tap en de Tepel De Tap en de Tepel De Tap en de Tepel
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    The beguinage

    by wandeljp Updated Jan 8, 2014

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    The great beguinage Ghent

    ---oooOOOooo---

    Located in Saint-Amandsberg this beguinage was built in 1874 by the Duke of Arenberg benefactor for 100 women and 600 Beguines who had to leave the Beguine Sint Elisabeth of Ghent (after 600 years) under pressure from the city Liberal council .

    In 2003 the last béguinne left us, ending a whole chapter of history.

    Today still many houses, convents, hospitals, chapels and a church which together offer a wonderful view of a "village" in the city: a UNIQUE place in the world.

    ---oooOOOooo---

    Situé à Saint-Amandsberg, ce béguinage fut construit en 1874 par le bienfaiteur Le Duc d'Arenberg pour les 100 dames et 600 béguines qui durent quitter le Béguinage Saint Elisabeth de Gand (après 600 ans) sous la pression du conseil de ville Libéral.

    En 2003 la dernière béguinne nous quitta , mettant fin à tout un pan d'histoire .

    Reste aujourd'hui de nombreuses maisons, couvents, hôpitaux, chapelles et une église dont l'ensemble offre une vue unique d'un "village" dans ville : un endroit UNIQUE au monde

    ---oooOOOooo---

    View from the front of the church View of the front of the church
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    Faces: Looking Down on You

    by von.otter Updated Jan 8, 2013

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    “Ghent retains much of its old commercial activity. The buildings in both are very fine and wonderfully picturesque, with some grand historical association meeting you at every corner.”
    — from a letter written by Samuel Clark to his sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Victor, January 1858

    Faces, incorporated into building façades, are a common feature on European buildings, both sacred and profane. Ghent is no exception. There is always someone watching over you, some are animals, such as the winged lion in photo #5.

    Faces in Ghent, May 2011 Faces in Ghent, May 2011 Faces in Ghent, May 2011 Faces in Ghent, May 2011
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    Jacob van Artevelde Monument

    by von.otter Written Sep 28, 2012

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    “Ghent, I found to be an enormous, empty city, with an old Flemish gable-end peeping here and there from its rows of dull, white houses, and various tall and battered old church-towers looking down over deserted, sunny squares.”
    — from “Transatlantic Sketches,” 1875, by Henry James (1843-1916)

    In the center of Vrijdagmarktplein, Friday Market Square, stands a 36-foot tall tribute opposite bottom to Jacob van Artevelde. Designed by a native of Ghent, Petrus de Vigne-Quoy, this powerful bronze was unveiled by Léopold I, King of the Belgians in 1863.

    Artevelde, a Ghent native, sought to protect Flemish prosperity during the Hundred Years’ War by siding with England.

    Jacob van Artevelde Monument, Ghent, May 2011 Jacob van Artevelde Monument, Ghent, May 2011 Jacob van Artevelde Monument, Ghent, May 2011 Jacob van Artevelde Monument, Ghent, May 2011 Jacob van Artevelde Monument, Ghent, May 2011
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    The Flander’s Leo

    by von.otter Updated Sep 28, 2012

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    “Ghent is a pleasant town to ramble through, with its threefold interests of history, architecture, and commerce, and in addition to this, it possesses the advantage of being a town where life and animation abound.”
    — from “Belgium and the Belgians” 1903 by Cyril Scudamore

    Is your astrological sign Leo, the lion? If it is, or if you travel with some who is a Leo as I do, let me suggest a fun way to recognize the Leo in your life and in the process take some unique and fun photos: pose with architectural and decorative lions.

    Because of ‘Vlaenderen die Leu’ (Flanders the Lion), throughout Ghent you will find plenty of lions to pose with. There are indoor and outdoor lions; old and modern ones; large and small lions; some are on doors as knockers, while others are integrated into traffic posts (see photo #5); there’s a lion for every Leo in Ghent.

    Beginning with the first count of Flanders the arms used were called Oude Vlaenderen (Old Flanders). During the Holy Crusade of 1177, Philippe d’Alsace, Count of Flanders, valiantly won a banner showing a black lion on a gold field from a Mohammedan monarch in battle against the Sarracens. When he returned home, Philip dropped the Oude Vlaenderen and adopted “Or a lion rampant sable” (gold with a rampant black lion) as his arms. Since that time all counts of Flanders have used those arms.

    The motto ‘Vlaenderen die Leu’ (Flanders the Lion) appeared on the arms of Pieter de Coninck at the Battle of the Golden Spurs on 11.July.1302 near Groeningekouter. Three hundred noblemen shouted it when they saw that tide was turning in favor of the Flemish.

    The Flander Leo, Ghent, May 2011 The Flander Leo, Ghent, May 2011 The Flander Leo, Ghent, May 2011 The Flander Leo, Ghent, May 2011 The Flander Leo, Ghent, May 2011
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    Actually, this is ON the beaten path...

    by steedappeal Updated Nov 14, 2011

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    The cuberdon battle goes "Nose to Nose" in the heart of Gent! These purple, conned shaped candies (called the Neus of Ghent) have a very aromatic flavor. They make wonderful souvenirs but make sure to keep at room temperature since they'll melt and stick in your pockets. Not sure if this is friendly, retail warfare. After purchasing at one place I noticed the other cart is 1 Euro cheaper- oh well!
    The location is a short walk from the NH hotel near the Korenmarkt (right next to the famous mustard store Tierenteyn-Verlent).

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    Aqua Azul Sauna

    by steedappeal Written Nov 13, 2011

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    This is an Art Nouveau themed CO-ED sauna. It is beautifully crafted out of an old town house. It is a very serene and special place. They are especially good about orienting first-time visitors to the rules of sauna engagement- especially that peace and quiet should be preserved in the actual sauna and bath areas. There is a lovely bar to enjoy a drink before or after the sauna. It's all about heating the body up and letting it cool down. Unlike Sauna Deco in Amsterdam, this is on several levels involving quite a few steps. make sure to climb up to the relaxation room, too.

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    Westerbegraafplaats

    by vpeter Written Jun 8, 2011

    The Westerbegraafplaats is a beautiful cemetry outside the centre of Gent.
    You can reach it by taking tramline 1 and a little walk.
    On the cemetry you'll find wargraves from WW I and WW II.
    One of my favourite Belgian authors, Cyriel Buysse, is als burried here.

    The adress is:
    Palinghuizen 143
    9000 Gent

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    Leopoldskazerne

    by penumbra Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Once the marshaling grounds for troops during WW I, the Leopoldskazerne is the new home of HISK candidates laureates.

    Address: Charles de Kerchovelaan 187

    Leopoldskazerne Leopoldskazerne Leopoldskazerne
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    Citadelpark

    by penumbra Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Trees, ponds and flowers have replaced the foreboding citadel of Ghent. A site that was once used Wellington, Charles V and as an abbey of St. Bavon is now home to Floraliapaleis (Feestpaleis), an exhibition and trade fair complex. The park also holds the Museum of Fine Arts , completed in 1902.

    Pathway on the west side of Citadelpark Bandstand in Citadelpark
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Gent Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Gent off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Gent sightseeing.

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