Gruuthuse Museum, Brugge

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  • Gruuthuse museum
    Gruuthuse museum
    by mindcrime
  • Gruuthuse museum
    Gruuthuse museum
    by mindcrime
  • Gruuthuse museum
    Gruuthuse museum
    by mindcrime
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    Gruuthuse museum

    by mindcrime Written Sep 14, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gruuthuse museum
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    Gruuthuse museum is housed on an impressive palace that once belonged to one of the wealthiest families in town.

    Although I liked the building I have to admit that I got disappointed with its rich collection. There are many objects to see covering many centuries (from 15th to 19th century), I liked some tapestries, don’t forget that Brugge was always famous for its textile industry but after a while I just walked from one room to the other without really enjoying anything here but it’s a matter of personal taste too, I’m not really into ceramics or silverware.

    What’s more the truth is that although I like to see detailed altarpieces in churches I get bored when I see them in museums, same goes for the numerous wooden crucifixes of course.

    It’s open Tuesday to Sunday 9.30-17.00
    Entrance fee is 6 euros but we preferred to buy the 3day museum card that costs 15 euros and gave us free access to every museum in Brugge!

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    Gruuthuse, a Splendid Museum, Part III

    by von.otter Written Aug 7, 2012
    Gruuthuse, Interior, May 2011
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    “On the way back I spent the afternoon in Bruges, which has a sort of picturesque concentrated Flemish beauty which is almost unbearable.”
    — Dame Iris Murdoch DBE (1919-1999, British author)

    The diverse Gruuthuse collection was begun in 1865 by the Archeological Society of Brugge. In 1955 the city of Brugge took over operations, expanding both the collection and the museum.

    The sculptural art collection includes wooden crucifixes and partial altarpieces; the 1659 marble Baroque memorial of England’s Charles II; and the 1520 bust of Holy Emperor Charles V, aged 20. Some Gothic trunks and cupboards join 17th and 18th century wooden pieces in the furniture collection. Silverware includes religious objects and items for domestic use. The ceramics collection includes earthenware and ceramics from Brussels, Delft, Northern-France, and Germany. Seventeenth century wall tapestries, made in Brugge, are among the textiles on view. Belgium has long been known for its tapestry art. There is also a numismatics collection and a grouping of small musical instruments.

    Gruuthuse is open every day from 09.30 until 17.00; it is closed on Mondays, except Easter & Whit Monday.

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    Gruuthuse, a Splendid Museum, Part II

    by von.otter Written Aug 7, 2012

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    Gruuthuse, Front Gate, Brugge, May 2011
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    “We spent several days at Bruges, partly for the sake of my old reminiscences and associations there, and partly because my wife had some literary work in hand which she was anxious to finish.”
    — from “What I Remember, Volume 3” by Thomas Adolphus Trollope (1810-1892)

    The most prominent member of the Gruuthuse family was Lodewijk van Gruuthuse (Louis of Gruuthuse, 1422-1492); he was a diplomat and an art lover. His equestrian marble (see photo #5) can be seen above the main door leading to the museum. His personal motto reads Plus est en Vous (There is More in You. The motto is in French because it was the language of European medieval nobility, as well the language of diplomacy). This entry wing was built in 1465, during Lodewijk’s lifetime. In 1628 Gruuthuse became a pawn shop. Following a complete renovation, partially in the Neo-Gothic style between 1883 and 1898, the entire building became the city’s archeological museum.

    Lodewijk, the only son of John IV of Bruges and Margaret of Steenhuyse, was born in about 1427. He grew up in the 15th century, Brugge’s golden age, when the city was flush with cash from its shipping and cloth trade. Lodewijk trained to be a soldier, learning the art of war. In 1443 he was an outstanding participant in the Burgundian tournament of the White Bear, a knightly festival held in Brugge. His victory caught the attention of Duke Philip the Good, the Burgundian ruler of Brugge; Louis was appointed as the duke’s personal squire. This honor, open only to young noblemen, was the start of a dazzling career at the court of the dukes of Burgundy. Lodewijk was councilor and lifelong loyal courtier of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy.

    Here is an explanation of the coat-of-arms (see photo #2) of Gruuthuse family. The shield, sectioned into quarters, shows in the first and fourth quarters a black crossbow, the weapon of the Gruuthuse, in the red second and third quarters, the white Cross of St. Andrew.

    Gruuthuse is open every day from 09.30 until 17.00; it is closed on Mondays, except Easter & Whit Monday.

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    Gruuthuse, a Splendid Museum, Part I

    by von.otter Written Aug 7, 2012
    Gruuthuse, Brugge, May 2011
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    “I believe we have seen to-day almost everything very remarkable at Bruges; but I assure you we shall want to see much of it again. This is a most stunning place, immeasurably the best we have come to. There is a quantity of first-rate architecture, and very little or no Rubens.”
    — from a letter written by Dante Rossetti (1828-1882) dated 25.October.1849, sent from Hotel du Commerce, Bruges

    The splendid museum that is housed at Gruuthuse is located behind the Welcome Church of Our Lady. This impressive mansion was owned by one of the richest families of medieval Brugge.

    In the Middle Ages to brew beer gruit was a necessary ingredient (until beer brewed from hops was developed in the 14th century). The old Flemish word ‘gruut’ means peeled barley or wheat. The family Van Brugghe-van der Aa, known as the lords of Gruuthuse, held a monopoly and grew wealthy from the essential ingredient; it gave the family its nickname.

    Inside the 15th-century Gruuthuse, whose is courtyard bordered by high walls, you will delight at the sculpture, the silverware, the textiles and the furniture assembled there.

    Gruuthuse is open every day from 09.30 until 17.00; it is closed on Mondays, except Easter & Whit Monday.

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    The Gruuthuse Museum

    by Balam Written Jan 23, 2012

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    The Gruuthuse Museum is a great 15th century mansion that was once owned by Lodewijk Van Gruuthose, It is an excellent place to get a real sense of the life the burghers led during the 1300s.
    It contains some fine examples of Sculptural art, Furniture, Silver and Metal ware as well as ceramics and textiles.

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    The Gruuthuse

    by richiecdisc Updated Feb 19, 2007

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    the majestic Gruuthuse

    The Gruuthuse now houses a historical museum but the illustrious former mansion of the lords of Gruuthuse has an interesting history. Gruut is the Flemish word for a concoction of barley or wheat and herbs, which was the Middle Age equivalent of hops in today’s beer brewing world. Due to their control of this coveted ingredient, the lords of Bruges grew disproportionately wealthy and hence became known as the lords of Gruuthuse. The current museum's extensive collection includes furniture, kitchen equipment, weaponry, tapestry and lace. Admission is 4 Euros.

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    The Gruuthuse's mansion

    by Norali Written Dec 2, 2005

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    A mansion with its atmospheric yard near the cathe
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    Yes, this is typically something I would describe as "not-to-miss". A stroll in the yard of Gruuthuse's house. The Gruuthuse were a family who was in the barley business in the time where this particular commodity was really sought after in the countries of beer. It was the main ingredient in beer brewing (water apart). They were rich at such an extent that they could have their mansion with private entry to the neighbouring cathedral.

    I loved it in their cobblestoned yard because it was still so atmospheric.

    The building is now a museum. Gruuthuse museum is an archeological museum that contains artefacts (paintings, laces, tapestry..).

    I spent most of my time there taking pictures of the walls that look into the yard. The tall building at your right was reported to be built in 1465, in the time of Ludewijk van Gruuthuse (art lover and diplomat, according to www.trabel.com). His statue on his horse is seen at the front of the building, in a niche and above his motto.

    I loved there the wooden house too. I don't know whether it is still part of the Gruuthuse mansion, though.

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    Gruuthuse museum

    by Helga67 Updated Apr 25, 2004

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    Gruuthuse Museum

    This museum is situated in the former palace of the aristocratic family of Gruuthuse.

    It is an archeological museum. The reception hall, kitchen, dining room, bedrooms and other rooms have a collection of everyday objects plus works of art: furniture, pottery, silverware, lace, coins, etc.

    The museum depicts the daily life of the inhabitants of the palace and the bourgeoisie of that time.

    Edward IV, King of England, found refuge here during his exile in 1471.

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  • eden_teuling's Profile Photo

    GRUUTHUSEMUSEUM

    by eden_teuling Updated Mar 23, 2004

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    MUSEUM

    Completely new presentation of the collection.

    The 15th Century palace of the Lords of Gruuthuse contains a remarkable collection of applied art, featuring furniture, tapestries, musical instruments, paintings, silverware, tin, pottery and weapons from the 13th - the 19th CENTURY.

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  • Gruuthuse house and museum

    by sabsi Written Jan 11, 2004

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    Gruuthuse house

    In medieval times one of the richest families of Brugge, the van Gruuthuse family, owned this modest city mansion ;)

    Guess how they earned their money? Can I help? Think..... You're in Belgium.... what's huge in Belgium? No, not chips or chocolate. Beer?! Right, it's beer!!! The word 'gruut' in Flemish means wheat that is used for beer brewing. This family owned the monopoly on gruut in those times.

    Today the building is home of the archeological city museum.

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    Gruuthuse

    by tompt Written Jan 3, 2004

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    entrancegate to the Gruuthuse

    This big city mansion belonged to one of the richest families of Brugs. Today it is the archeological city museum of Bruges.

    The Gruuthuse family was very important. The old Flemish word 'gruut' means : peeled barley or wheat. This was the main ingredient for beer-brewing in the Middle Ages. The lords of Bruges had the monopoly for the sale of this very important product. Because of their monopoly position they became very wealthy and powerful and they soon became known as the 'lords of Gruuthuse' (huse= house).
    The house dates back to the 15th century.

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    Oude vrouwtjes achter Gruuthuse museum

    by speed4turtles Updated Aug 24, 2003
    Gruuthuse museum

    If you turn yourself around,on the statue of Guide Gezelle, you will be able to see the beauty of the "Gruuthuse museum"

    Dijver 17 : voormalig Paleis van de Heren van Gruuthuse (15e eeuw), dat in 1955 een museumfunktie kreeg. Het zeer gevarieerde museumaanbod bestaat uit meubilair, huisraad, zilverwerk, wandtapijten, kant, keramiek, glas, wapens, muzieken meetinstrumenten, e.d.m.

    yahoo

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    Gruuthuse Museum

    by Fen Updated Jul 31, 2003

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    The Gruuthuse museum occupies a large medieval mansion close to the Dijver Canal.
    In the 15th Century, it was inhabited by the merchant or Lord of the Gruuthuse who had the exclusive right to lexy a tax on the "Gruit" an imported mixture of herbs added to barley during the beer-brewing process.

    There are many things inside the museum like tapestries, wood carvings, furniture and even a medical section devoted to cures of everyday ailments such as haemorrhoids. So it seems that even in those days they got to the bottom of things when it came to cures.

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  • Gruuthusemuseum :

    by annelies77 Updated Sep 12, 2002

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    Past the church and its shadow, you come to the Gruuthusemuseum.
    Even if this stately house, a gem of civil gothic architecture, was completely empty, it would still be worth looking around. But it's far from being empty. You will find here a wealth of carpets, furniture, lace, weapons, coins, antiques and hundreds of other interesting exhibits.

    It's also nice to approach the Gruuthuse from the other side of the church, via the backdoor, as it were. This brings you to the St. Bonifacius bridge, possibly the prettiest in Bruges, even though it was built in the 20th century.

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    Gruuthuse Museum

    by Sjalen Written Aug 26, 2002

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    A fifteenth century mansion which is a real treasure trove. You don't have to love antiques to go, you will simply like what you see anyway. My personal favourite is the 1472 chapel with a window into the adjacent church so the owner could sit in his own house and follow the service!

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