Reninge Travel Guide

  • De church of Reninge
    De church of Reninge
    by wandeljp
  • Dragon-fly
    Dragon-fly
    by JosM
  • City Hall
    City Hall
    by JosM

Reninge Things to Do

  • JosM's Profile Photo

    by JosM Updated Feb 5, 2005

    The church was constructed in a neo-gothic style as part of an Augustine abbey. She dates back to 1119 and has been restored several times.
    At entering one remarks immediately the Renaissance interiors. The elder parts were constructed in the 13th century. The front (close to the altar) of the church served as an abbey church, while the back served as parish church. The church was plundered in 1578 and destroyed by a fire in 1580. It was rebuild in the same style during the first half of the 17th century. During the French Revolution, the monks were chased away and the church since then only served as a parish church.
    Open: all year round on Thursday morning
    July-August: daily between 14.30 an 17.00 hrs.

    St-Pieterskerk
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • JosM's Profile Photo

    by JosM Written Feb 5, 2005

    This gate is the only remaining of the 4 gates of Lo. The canals were used for defense and as city borders. The city's diameter used to be less than 400 meter (440 yards). The medieval walls were destroyed during the years 1581-1582 on order from the Duke of Anjou and the Prince of Orange. The Westgate dates back to the 14th century and was restorated in 1852 and 1991.
    Next to the gate we can see the legendary Caesar's tree. It's a Taxus tree (Conifer) and it may grow for a thousand years. According to legend, Julius Caesar, on his way to Britain, tied up his horse to the tree and rested in the shadow of its crown.
    The house next to the tree, called the "Damberd" (draught-board) once housed the oldest Lo brewery, proven by writings from 1499.

    Westgate and Caesar's tree
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • JosM's Profile Photo

    by JosM Written Feb 5, 2005

    The tower was constructed by abbot Patricius Fraeys in 1710 on abbey property. Story goes that, when the newly chosen abbot left for a pilgrimage to Rome, the monks asked if they were allowed to surprise him at his return. When he arrived he immediately remarked the pigeon tower with its 1132 cages. The ownership of a pigeon tower once was a sign of wealth: only large landowners and Lords had the right to keep pigeons

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Reninge

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

74 travelers online now

Comments

Reninge Travel Guide
Map of Reninge

View all Reninge hotels