Other Belgian, Brussels

4.5 out of 5 stars 88 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Other Belgian
    by GrantBoone
  • Other Belgian
    by GrantBoone
  • My Belgian Frites and Croquette
    My Belgian Frites and Croquette
    by LoriPori
  • adelinemmc's Profile Photo

    Restobieres: Everything cooked in beer

    by adelinemmc Updated May 12, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This restaurant is now very popular, it has expanded since my last visit a few years ago (I think they moved a few doors down) and the service is clearly suffering. Big groups in particular might find the service very slow.

    These are good value with choices such as schrimp croquettes or snails for starters, rabbit, steak, salmon for mains, all cooked in different types of beers.

    The food was generally very good. The waterzoi (chicken in cream sauce) was very tasty and a big portion; the rabbit stew is outstanding and bursting with flavours.

    Many different beers available in bottles, a few choices on taps.

    Favorite Dish: The dessert Sabayon a la Kriek is out of this world! It's a light creme anglaise whipped with cherry-flavour beer into an airy almost mousse-like delight.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • solopes's Profile Photo

    L'Estrille du Vieux Bruxells: For next time

    by solopes Updated Jan 1, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Brussels

    "Probably the oldest inn of Brussels, as indicates it its pinion dated 1587," L'Estrille du vieux Bruxelles " is in keeping with the heart of a street deeply related to the past of the legendary Sablon and its vestiges of the first medieval urban surrounding wall."

    * Yes, that's what we may read in the page of this restaurant where we didn't enter, but whose facade attracted all of us instantaneously. I had to read about it, and the temptation is set: next time, dinner here and coffee at the "Entrée des Artistes" nearby, for a first class night.

    Was this review helpful?

  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    Le Cirio: Classic place at the Beurs

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Jul 15, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Le Cirio at night
    4 more images

    Le Cirio was founded in 1886 by the Italian Francesco Cirio as a shop for Italian specialities. After more than 100 years the location still is home to many original pieces of shop history; like the washrooms.

    The setting is cosy and on warmer days you can enjoy the terrace too.

    The fresh Belgium waffels are recommended!

    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting
    • Food and Dining
    • Seniors

    Was this review helpful?

  • lichinga's Profile Photo

    Beer Mania: A paradise for true beers

    by lichinga Updated Jun 10, 2012

    Light food is served as accompanying plates to the very core business, that is "Beers", with capital "B". Belgium is maybe a paradise for the incredible variety of beers and in Beer Mania there's also one extra label you won't find so easily around: Mea Culpa is brewed by the owner himself using 10 specialingredients to add flavours (not excessive!) to the traditional malt beer.

    Favorite Dish: Kriek...maybe not a "pure" beer, but I adore it.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Diane_Ash's Profile Photo

    Fin de Siecle: Real Belgian Food at Decent Prices.

    by Diane_Ash Written Jun 7, 2012

    When i was living in Brussels, this was absolutely my favorite restaurant. The menu offers only real belgian meals, the way my mother would make it.

    You can't make reservations and the place can get pretty crowded in the evening, though we never had to wait too long.

    Favorite Dish: My favourite dish was the 'stoemp': mashed potatoes with sausage and some sause i don't remember the name of.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Food and Dining
    • Beer Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Maison Antoine: Best Frites in Town

    by von.otter Updated May 6, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Maison Antoine, Bruxelles, May 2011
    4 more images

    “The mind loves the unknown. It loves images whose meaning is unknown, since the meaning of the mind itself is unknown.”
    — Rene Magritte (1898-1967) Belgian Surrealist artist

    WHAT IS KNOWN Maison Antoine is widely known as the best friterie for French fries, made from fresh potatoes, in Bruxelles. Because I have not sampled all the frites from all the frites shops in town, I must say they are very good. When combined with any of those dozen of sauces offered they are outstanding.

    It is clear from the opening hours, Sunday to Thursday, 11:30 to 13:00 and Fridays to Saturday, 11:30 to 14:00, Maison Antoine is intended as a lunchtime stop. The small, almost kiosk-sized, friterie, without indoor seating, is located in the European Union (EU) Quarter of Etterbeek. This is well outside the central historic district, requiring a Métro ride to reach it. If you combine a quick spin around the rather dull EU, the day can have a bright spot in it.

    Frites are french fries and friteries are the places that fry them. Frites are a national specialty, friteries, at least in Brussels are an endangered species. Real estate is too valuable and to scarce to support a simple friterie. Fortunately Brussel’s best friterie has survived - Maison Antoine.

    What we call French Fries in the USA were created in Belgium. Here is who Maison Antoine makes its frites. They are twice fried; first, they are blanched at a low temperature; then, when an order is placed, they are fried to a crisp, golden brown, one order at a time. The traditional topping is a dollop of mayonaise, which works for me!

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Ma Folle de Soeur: My Crazy Sister

    by von.otter Written May 6, 2012
    Ma Folle de Soeur, Bruxelles, May 2011
    4 more images

    “I left my carriage only once, at the first stage, and landed at half-past five in the afternoon at the Hotel de Flandres, in Brussels. It was the coldest day there had been this winter, and was growing colder the whole day. The ground was covered with one sheet of snow the whole way, though not anywhere three inches deep. The travelling in sledges would have been excellent.”
    — from a letter, dated 26.January.1815, John Quincy Adams wrote to Mrs. Adams

    Ma folle de soeur roughly translates from French to English as my crazy sister.

    Located near Place Stéphanie, Ma Folle de Soeur is a small restaurant with a large front window and a small front door. At lunch time, the restaurant is frequented by business people in a hurry and in the evening by couples and groups of friends. The menu, following the seasonal produce available in the market, is always being revised to reflect what is on hand. The food was a very good.

    Ma Folle de Soeur is located directly across the street from Hotel Stéphanie Manos, where we stopped for our seven-day stay in Bruxelles. We ate here on our last night in town. There is an outdoor space at the rear for dining; I would not call it a garden because it is completely concrete with only a few potted plants. It was pleasant to take our dinner there because the night was beautiful and the dining room was crowded.

    Ma Folle de Soeur is open Monday through Friday 12:00 to 14:30 and Monday to Saturday 18:30 to 20:30.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Tour d’y Voir: Great Food, Cozy Setting

    by von.otter Written May 3, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tour d���y Voir, Bruxelles, May 2011
    4 more images

    “More than half a million people dwell within the limits of Brussels and its suburbs; one is apt to be struck, not by the size of the city, but by its apparent smallness.”
    — from “Belgium and the Belgians” 1907 by Cyril Scudamore

    Tour D’y Voir, located on fashionable Place du Grand Sablon, is elegant and refined without being snobby. Take note of the view of the square, the furnishings and the paintings. Their menu is modern Belgian/French cuisine; they also have a nice wine list.

    The staff was friendly, helpful, quiet and efficient. The rate at which each course was brought to the table was perfect. Between each course, we enjoyed complimentary seasoned olives (just great!) and bread & butter. My pasta was perfectly cooked and very tasty (see photo #3). Because we visited in the spring traditional white asparagus were on the seasonal menu (see photo #5).

    I strongly recommend this place for its service, ambiance and definitely for it’s food.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Brasserie Roue d’Or: Paying Homage to Magritte

    by von.otter Written Apr 13, 2012
    Brasserie Roue d���Or, Bruxelles, May 2011
    4 more images

    “It’s better than being called ‘The Idiot from Brussels’.”
    — Jean-Claude Van Damme (1960- ), his response when asked his thoughts about his nickname, ‘Muscles from Brussels’

    Dominated by dark wood and mirrors, Brasserie Roue d’Or is located near Grand-Place. The marble-topped tables sit amongst the high ceiling and walls frescoed with Magritte-like images (see photo #5).

    With an extensive menu, that ranges from grilled meats to salmon and other seafood, as well as Belgian favorites such as stoemp (mashed potatoes and carrots with sausage, a steak, or other meat), this welcoming Art Nouveau brasserie, with a loyal local following, caters to a wide range of appetites. The beer, wine, and spirits list is lengthy too.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    La Vigna Restaurant: Something Basic, Something Good

    by von.otter Written Apr 9, 2012
    Restaurant La Vigna, Bruxelles, May 2011
    4 more images

    “I left my carriage only once, at the first stage, and landed at half-past five in the afternoon at the Hotel de Flandres, in Brussels. It was the coldest day there had been this winter, and was growing colder the whole day. The ground was covered with one sheet of snow the whole way, though not anywhere three inches deep. The travelling in sledges would have been excellent.”
    — from a letter by John Quincy Adams to Mrs. Adams, Brussels, 26.January.1815

    La Vigna, located in the Schaerbeek section of town, is a basic Belgian bistro-style restaurant. The service is quick; the food is good; the atmosphere is lively. It is not a destination restaurant, but a neighborhood one. We enjoyed our first meal (it was dinner, the only meal served) in Bruxelles here on the recommendation of the front desk staff at our hotel, the Manos Stephanie, which is close by.

    Favorite Dish: Steak frites (see photo #2) is a menu staple; as are white asparagus (see photo #4) in the spring.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    FRITERIES: BELGIAN FRITES

    by LoriPori Written Mar 8, 2012

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    My Belgian Frites and Croquette

    I probably drove IanGrace crazy with my request for BELGIAN FRITES. I just had to have some. She asked around and found one near the Galeries Royales. It was a "Frituur" and Snack Bar. Just the perfect place to satisfy my cravings. I ordered a large "Frites" - do NOT call them French Fries - with a side of Mayonnaise. And I also ordered a croquette - mmm! Lekker.
    There was so many, I couldn't eat them all. The croquette was delicious as were the Frites.
    Thank you IanGrace and Werner and Kyle. You made my day!

    Was this review helpful?

  • 07paul's Profile Photo

    O'Bifanas: don't miss the bacaljau

    by 07paul Written Jan 19, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In Rue des Dominicains 30, Sebastiao Garcia, a (small) portugese guy with a big moustache runs the place for at least 20years. Southern hospitality and good food with a mediteranean touch ! Must be one of the smallest resto's in Brussels. Kitchen in the cellar, street terras + small diningroom + first floor (if you can get up the narrow stairs).
    I used to come here often in the late 90's and only went back last december.
    Food was still outstanding, and incredible...he recognised me as 'a regular' !
    http://o-bifanas.be/Bifana1.html

    Favorite Dish: Bacalhau à Lagareiro, great stuff !

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Seniors
    • Work Abroad

    Was this review helpful?

  • shrimp56's Profile Photo

    La Brouette: A tavern/restaurant that will serve you well!

    by shrimp56 Updated Sep 6, 2011

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The La Brouette facade
    2 more images

    The original building dates to the 12th century. After several fires and bombardments it was restored in 1697 to match Leroy d'Espagne next door. It is very atmospheric and bustling.
    ======
    We ate here again in Fall 2010. We both had flammekuchen that were quite good. Note the "Belgian endive" :)

    Favorite Dish: I had the tomatoes stuffed with tiny prawns. There were originally 2 on my plate, but I was hungry I forgot to take a picture until after I had wiped out #1. Service was a bit more brusque than Leroyd'Espagne, but the Affligem Brun beer rocked. Both these restaurants serve good basic food and beer. I prefer Leroy d'Espagne by a slight margin, but either are good, reasonably priced [for a tourist location] options in the area.

    Was this review helpful?

  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    La Moule Sacrée: Good choice near the Grand Place

    by toonsarah Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Outside La Moule Sacree

    We ate in this restaurant just south of the Grand Place on our first evening in Brussels. It seemed a mid-range place for the neighbourhood, neither really fancy nor very plain and simple. Although there was a set menu as appears almost ubiquitous in Brussels we didn’t choose from it but treated ourselves to dishes from the a la carte selection.

    I started with ”salade au rocquefort” which was fresh and generous, though nothing special, and for my main course chose turbot cooked with ginger and served with red peppers and mashed potato, which I really enjoyed. Chris had the cheese croquettes to start with, and was happy with these and with his steak in mustard sauce (though it was cooked a little rarer than he had specified), and particularly liked his gratin dauphinois. With a beer each this meal cost us 71 EUR.

    Was this review helpful?

  • xuessium's Profile Photo

    Guignol: Eat with the dolls!

    by xuessium Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This was my first meal in Brussels itself as my buddy took me here for good hearty Flemish chow, being Flemish himself.

    The restaurant is tucked away, at a corner, among a row of shophouses. I could have walked past it without really casting a serious look at it. The first floor is a bar, dimly litted but was already packed full with folks guzzling down Belgian beer.

    We got a table on the second floor, already packed, in one corner with a window so the location was decidingly brighter. Sturdy wooden tables and chair. Deep coloured (but not gaudy) painted walls with theatre-themed murals. Almost like eating in a village tavern. Very atmospheric. All around us, folks were enjoying their dinner and the place was exploding with excited chatter and the clatter of cutleries against porcelain.

    The signature of the place...well, for folks who understand French, you would have known that it is all about DOLLS! (Guignol meaning doll in French) The walls were dancing away with a vast collection of hand-operated wooden dolls, used in theatre plays, all decked out in the finest of medieval western clothes. They are dancing from the ceiling, off the wall and literally leaping out around bends. (They kinda reminded me of the wayang puppets of Indonesia, albeit in a western setting) You can't walk to any part of the restaurant (including the washroom) without at least a pair of eyes watching keenly over you. Both fascinating and creepy at the same time!

    Favorite Dish: The food was hearty and my buddy was eager to show me the best of Flemish cooking. Though tired after a long day flying in from Iceland, I was spoilt for choice. In the end, I went for Waterzooi Ghent Style (11.50Euros), kinda like chicken "stewed-to-death" with potatoes, carrots and onions. I suppose you can't get any more Flemish than this dish!

    It was delicious. Flavourful. The aroma danced on my tongue with repeated encores. Creamy yet not overpowering so; the vegetables perfectly complementing the chicken. After a long day, this was possibly just what I wanted. The soup and vegetables were gone in a flash. My only lame complain: The chicken was chicken breast meat, and it was a huge chunk. In Asia, we usually use this part of the chicken to make soup but we generally do not serve it as the meat is seen to be too chunky and dry. (We always prefer our dark meat - the thighs) It was just a little too heavy going to be chewing through something so dry and a little unpalatable...but I did manage to chomp down a quarter or so before I finally raised the white flag.

    Also went from Creme Brulee (4.50Euros). I was dying for good Creme Brulee. I found the custard portion a little too hard for my liking so it was a little disappointing.

    It was also the first night I was introduced to Belgian Frites. Crispy on the outside, tender soft on the inside. Delicious. But, gosh, the size of the servings!!

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Brussels

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

90 travelers online now

Comments

View all Brussels hotels