Eglise St Nicolas, Brussels

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  • Église de St-Nicolas, Bruxelles, May 2011
    Église de St-Nicolas, Bruxelles, May...
    by von.otter
  • Eglise St Nicolas
    Eglise St Nicolas
    by zadunajska8
  • Eglise St Nicolas
    Eglise St Nicolas
    by zadunajska8
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    Eglise St Nicolas

    by zadunajska8 Written Aug 19, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Eglise St Nicolas
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    Near the stock exchange and surrounded by shops is the church dedicated to St Nicholas who quite appropriately is the patron saint of merchants, although most of us know him better as Father Christmas or Santa Claus.

    The black grime has recently been cleaned off the stone of the gothic exterior of the church leaving a real beauty to admire.

    The church is happy to welcome people inside to have a look around (donations are welcomed too) and there are some good works of art to see inside, including one by Peter Paul Rubens. My favourite thing was however the shrine to St Nicholas which shows a statue of him bearded as we all know the old man of Christmas fame!

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    Église de St-Nicolas, Exterior

    by von.otter Updated Apr 22, 2012

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    ��glise de St-Nicolas, Bruxelles, May 2011
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    “People will be as before, the sheep sent to the slaughterhouses or to the meadows as it pleases the shepherds.”
    — Henri La Fontaine (1854-1943, Belgian Nobel Peace Prize winner, 1913)

    Église de St-Nicolas is a delightful little church behind Brussels’s Bourse (stock exchange) and not far from Grand-Place. This small church is almost 1,000 years old, but little can be seen of the original building. Its 11th-century Romanesque style is hidden by a 14th-century Gothic façade. The entrance to the church dates from the second half of the 12th century.

    Because the church is was just around the corner to Grand-Place, once Brussels’s main trading market, it was dedicated to Saint Nicholas, patron saint of the traders. The church was built in an asymmetrically because in the earlier days an irregular and small brook ran through this street.

    In 1929 a plan was introduced to demolish the church because it interfered with the traffic in the Boterstraat. Luckily, the plan never came to pass. It is remarkable that the houses surrounding the church have been preserved.

    The church is open weekdays 7:45 to 18:30, on Saturdays, 09:00 to 18:00 and on Sundays, 09:00 to 19:30; A Mass in English is celebrated Sunday at 10:00.

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    Église de St-Nicolas, Interior

    by von.otter Updated Apr 22, 2012

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    ��glise de St-Nicolas, Bruxelles, May 2011
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    “Let us not speak of tolerance. This negative word implies grudging concessions by smug consciences. Rather, let us speak of mutual understanding and mutual respect.”
    — Father Dominique Pire (1910-1969, Belgian Dominican Monk, 1958 Nobel Peace Prize Winner

    Repairs were made to St. Nicholas after the 1695 French bombardment. A French cannonball (see photo #2) is still lodged in an interior column of the Chapel of the Holy Virgin (see photo #3), constructed in 1486. The church holds a small painting by Peter Paul Rubens, The Virgin and Child (see photo #4); as well as the Vladimir Icon painted by an artist from Constantinople in 1131. The choir was completed in 1381. During the religious troubles in the 16th century, the church was plundered.

    In 1868 the relics of the Martyrs of Gorkum were transferred from the Netherlands to the Church of Saint Nicholas. A shrine (see photo #5), containing these relics, has been created and is on public view. These martyrs were 19 Catholic priests who had been tortured and executed on 9.July.1572 in the Dutch city of Gorinchem (or Gorkum, a village about 15 miles southwest of Rotterdam) during the religious troubles between Catholics and Protestants in the Low Countries. The Protestants were trying to force Franciscan, Norbertine, Augustinian and Dominican priests to renounce Catholicism and Christ’s presence in the Eucharist. Bas-reliefs of each martyr can be seen on the reliquary.

    The church is open weekdays 7:45 to 18:30, on Saturdays, 09:00 to 18:00 and on Sundays, 09:00 to 19:30; A Mass in English is celebrated Sunday at 10:00.

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    St Nicolas Church

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 11, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    This church lies just behind Le Bourse and is currently, (at time of writing), being renovated. There has been a church on this site since the 12th century when a market church was constructed but, like much of the Lower Town, it was damaged in the 1695 French Bombardment. Little remains of the original structure as a cannon ball lodged itself directly into an interior pillar and the bell tower finally collapsed in 1714. What is strange about this church are the small houses that huddle around it. Some are extremely small and narrow.
    The church holds a small painting by Rubens, the Virgin and Child, and the Vladimir Icon, painted by an artist from Constantinople in 1131.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Eglise St Nicolaas

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Dec 2, 2013

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    Sculpture

    This is one of the oldest churches in Brussels. Unfortunately it is currently under renovation and covered with scaffold. Here is a picture of a sculpture out front

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  • Lalique's Profile Photo

    St. Nicholas Cathedral

    by Lalique Written Nov 19, 2002

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    St. Nicholas Cathedral
    Very beautiful from the inside. Was built by rich merchants to show how wealthy they were....

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