Palais Royal, Brussels

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  • Palais Royal
    Palais Royal
    by macphile
  • The palace after the parade
    The palace after the parade
    by lina112
  • After the parade
    After the parade
    by lina112
  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Eglise St-Jacques-sur-Coudenberg - Church

    by Mikebb Written Jan 9, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Church
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    There has been a chapel on this site for over 700 years. The present church was built after the fire of 1731 and consecrated in 1787. The beautiful cupola is worth the visit.

    There are many more attractions within walking distance, a good district to wander around.

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    Royal Palace

    by rcsparty Written Nov 10, 2007

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    The palace was built by the Dukes of Burgundy in the 15th century. King Leopold I was the first Belgian King to live in the current structure, which replace the original burnt down by fire in the 1700's. Now this is used as the King's office, as the royal family resides in the Palace of Laken. If the king is in country, you will see a Belgian flag flying from the top of the palace. The palace is open during the summer from 10:30 to 4:30pm, and is well worth a visit. The Royal Park is also a nice place to enjoy a lunch.

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    Royal Palace

    by mileslunn Written Jul 22, 2007
    Main Royal Palace
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    There are two palaces. One in the city central which is the working place of the royal family and the other being the residence in Laeken. The working one will have the Belgian flag flying if the king is in Belgium, while it won't be flying if he is abroad. Likewise the side flagpole is for flying foreign flags whenever another head of state is visiting, so when I visited the king was in Belgium, but no foreign head of state was present.

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    Palais Royal

    by smirnofforiginal Written Jun 15, 2007

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    At the end of Parc de Bruxelles (the southern end) stands the Royal Palace. Built in the 19th century it ceased to be a royal residence when Queen Astrid (wife of Leopold III) dies. Belgian monachs now live in Laeken although this is still the "official" pad!

    You can go into the Royal Palace but for a limited time - end of July to the beginning of September (10:30am - 4:30pm Tuesday-Sunday). Admission is free and the reason to visit - for the highly controversial ceiling - lined with with the green wings taken from millions of moths. We were not there at the right time to go inside so I cannot comment further but it sounds rather bizarre!

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    Take a Summertime Tour of the Royal Palace

    by DanielF Updated Mar 13, 2007

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    If you visit Brussels during the Summer months (actually from late July to early September), you can join a guided tour of the Royal Palace. During the rest of the year, though, the building is closed to visitors.

    The Royal Palace was built as a showcase of the king's power rather than as a royal residence, as it seems that no one has ever lived here (The Laeken Palace, in Northern Brussels, has been the official residence of the royal family since the independence of Belgium). Its rooms are taken by offices and reception and dining halls where state events may be held, including a sumptuous guilded Throne Hall.

    There has been a palace on the Coudenberg Hill for centuries, but it was destroyed by a fire in the XVIII century. It used to stand on the location of the current Royal Square. The present Royal Palace was commissioned by the second King of independent Belgium, also named Leopold, to his favourite architect, Alphonse Balat and took many years to be completed. So many that neither the King nor his architect could see it finished.

    Drive in front of the Palace during the night and you will enjoy a pretty new vision of the building, as it is impressively lit up.

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    Not that much

    by metallemon Written Dec 13, 2006

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    We visited Palace our last day in Brussels and it seemed tome not that good as other monuments. The interior was good but we have to follow a specific route. The rooms are huge and they reflect the richness of royal family.
    I liked the most that before exit there was an area with games. The most funny was a hole where you could put your head and it seemed that your head was in a plate!

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    Koninklijk Paleis - Royal Palace

    by penumbra Written Dec 1, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Palais Royal

    The Palais Royal is massive, grey and imposing. Work on the Royal Palace began in 1820 but was decades in the making. It is used today to hold state receptions but visitors can tour the state rooms during the late summer.

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  • irisbe's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace

    by irisbe Updated Aug 27, 2006

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    Royal Palace in Brussels
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    This beautiful Palace was build in several parts. You would not notice it at first sight when you stand in front of it, it looks like a complete homogeneous building.
    In the beginning of August the Palace is open to the public. It is really worth seeing! Go if you are there.

    Be warne: no photography is allowed and you are asked to leave bigger bags and handbags in the vestiaire. They do look if you are not carrying any camera and there is surveillance in every room.
    I didn't dare to take the chance to take any picture.

    One of the eyecatches is the room decorated by the artist Jan Fabre: the ceiling and lights are decorated (covered) with the azur bleu/green whings of scarrabees.
    It is very beautiful, yet bizar.

    This palace is not the one where the royal family lives. This place is a working place and is used for all official visits and happenings.




    Open doors:
    The Royal Palace can be visit by the public from 22nd of July till 7th of September 2003, every day from 10:30 am til 4:30 pm, except on Mondays.

    From 9th of July on you can get these informations dialing the automatic message machine at : +32/(0)2-551.34.00 (French/) and +32/(0)2-551.34.01 (Dutch) and +32/(0)2-551.34.02 *German)

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    Palais Royal

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 11, 2006

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    The Palais Royal is the most important of the palaces around the Parc de Bruxelles. It is the official residence of the Belgian monarchy and was built in the 1820's on the site of the old Coudenberg Palace that burned down. Work continued under Leopold II when much of the Neo-Classical exterior was completed. It is only open from July-September so I couldn't take a look inside when I was visiting in May but the interior is said to be very lavish and oppulent.

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    Place Royal

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 11, 2006

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    In the centre of this attractive square is this statue of Godefroi of Bouillon (c. 1060-1100), a Brabant soldier who fought the first Catholic Crusades and died in Palestine. The statue was made by Eugène Simonis, and inaugurated on August 24, 1848.

    The square was once occupied by the Coudenberg Palace along Neo-Classical lines reminiscent of Vienna. Former Governor of Brussels Charles de Lorraine redeveloped the site after the palace had burnt down to form the square we see today. The square is a busy area with both traffic and tramlines criss-crossing it so take care whilst crossing over.

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    Where th King sleeps...

    by ZiOOlek Written Mar 20, 2006

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    Since it was founded in 1831, Belgium has been a hereditary constitutional monarchy. The King, whom the Constitution places above ideological and religious considerations, political opinions and debates and economic interests, has a role as arbitrator and guardian of the unity and independence of the country.

    King Albert II, sixth King of the Belgians, took the oath on 9 August 1993. He is married to Donna Paola Ruffo di Calabria.

    The King and Queen have three children: Prince Philippe, Princess Astrid and Prince Laurent.

    Prince Philippe and his wife, Princess Mathilde, have a daughter, Princess Elisabeth and two sons, Prince Gabriel and Prince Emmanuel.

    Princess Astrid and her husband Prince Lorenz, have five children: Prince Amedeo, Princess Maria Laura, Prince Joachim, Princess Luisa Maria and Princess Laetitia Maria.

    Prince Laurent and his wife, Princess Claire, have a daughter, Princess Louise, and two sons, Prince Nicolas and Prince Aymeric.

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    Where the King works...

    by ZiOOlek Written Mar 20, 2006

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    view from the park...
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    The Royal Palace of Belgium is one of the most beautiful official buildings in the capital, Brussels.

    Standing opposite the Parliament building on the other side of the Royal Park, the Royal Palace symbolises our system of government, that is to say, a constitutional monarchy. The Palace is the place where the King exercises his prerogatives as Head of State. It is at the Palace that the King grants audiences and deals with affairs of state. Apart from the offices of the King and the Queen, the Royal Palace houses the services of the Grand Marshal of the Court, the King's Head of Cabinet, the Head of the King's Military Household and the Intendant of the King's Civil List. The Palace also includes the State Rooms where large receptions are held, as well as the apartments provided for foreign Heads of State during official visits.

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    Palais Royal

    by sswagner Written Dec 31, 2005
    Palais Royal

    This building is in the impressive Royal Quarter of Brussels. It is adjacent to a nice park and is known to be the official residence of the Belgian monarchy. Once, this was the home of the duke of Brabant, however it eventually came into the hands of the monarchy and was restored to elegance. Although the palace is not available for tours in the winter, it is still worthwhile to walk around it and look at it from the outside.

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  • Brussels Royal Palace

    by MartinaH Updated Oct 24, 2005

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    Royal Palace

    The King and the Queen live in the Palace of Laeken and not in the Royal Palace. But it's the residence of the crown prince.

    The offices of the King are in the Royal Palace and it's used for receptions, royal audiences,...

    Some history:
    in 1731 the Palace burnt to the ground and was rebuilt later in the present neo-classic structure. Although the Palace was modified during French, Dutch and Austrian rule, the buildings remained essentialy the same until Leopold II.

    It's open during the summer from Mid-July to begin of September (closed on Mondays) from 10.30 to 16.30. The entrance is free, but there's no guide... you've to find the way on your own ;-)
    So enjoy seeing it from the inside as well - it worth it !!

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    The Imposing Monument

    by viddra Written Sep 5, 2005

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    royal palace

    The Royal Palace (le Palais Royal) is the most imposing monument of this district. It was modified in 1904 by King Leopold II.

    If you take a look at its façade, you'll see a bas-relief, representing Belgium, its flag and a medallion with the portrait of King Leopold II.

    Now, it's the official residence of the Belgian sovereigns.

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