The King's House - La Maison du Roi - Het Broodhuis, Brussels

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  • La Maison du Roi
    La Maison du Roi
    by mikey_e
  • The King's House - La Maison du Roi - Het Broodhuis
    by tere1
  • Maison du Roi
    Maison du Roi
    by Martinewezel
  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Maison du Roi

    by mikey_e Written Jan 4, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Maison du Roi was the original Maison du Duc de Brabant - actually, when the first building was erected here in the 12th century, it was a bakery (hence its Dutch name, broodhuis). This was a wooden structure that was replaced by a stone one for the Duke in the 1400s. When the Duke of Brabant's role was replaced by Charles V of Spain, it become the King's House and Charles had it rebuilt in a late Gothic style. It was destroyed during a French seige and rebuilt, yet again, in a neo-Gothic style in the 1870s. It all just goes to show you how fashion is really just circular.

    La Maison du Roi
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    Maison du Roi

    by tere1 Written Apr 10, 2008

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    At the Market Place, opposite the Town Hall, stands another of the remarkable historical Buildings of Brussels. The beautiful neo-gothic building with its many decorative statues is the "Maison du Roi" in French or "Broodhuis" in Dutch. It now harbours the historical City Museum.

    The Dutch name "Broodhuis" (i.e. bread house) clearly shows what the origins of this building were. In the beginning of the 13th century a wooden construction stood here. It was used by the bakers to sell their bread.

    On June the 2nd 1887 the King's House became the City Museum of Brussels On exhibition are original statues of the town hall, paintings, wall tapestries and different artifacts which have a relation to the history of the city.

    Opening hours
    Tuesday to Friday : from 10 am till 5 pm
    Weekends and holidays : from 10am till 1pm
    Closed on Mondays.
    Admission
    2,48 € (Euro) per person, 1,98 € (Euro) per person for groups of min. 12 persons

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  • DanielF's Profile Photo

    Visit the City Museum at the King's House

    by DanielF Updated Apr 10, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Just opposite the City Hall, there is another of the most striking buildings on the Market Square: the King's House, also known as Bread House. Its flaming filigrees and the delicate bronze statuettes which profusely decorate its façade may suggest that it is an ancient building. But it is actually not. Most of what we see today dates back to the late XIX century.

    The King's House stands where there used to be a cloth hall and then a bread hall (from where derives the name Broodhuis, which is still used in Flemish). Then, the Duke of Brabant decided that he needed an impressive building to host his administration that would counterbalance the grandeur of the City Hall and its belfry, symbols of the city's liberties. That is how that old wooden hall was replaced by the Gothic King's House (or Maison du Roi, as it is called in French) in the XV century.

    The building was reconstructed after the devastating bombing of 1695 in successive renovation projects that eventually disfigured it completely. In the XIX century, the city decided to give it back its original late Gothic appearance and a thorough reconstruction project was carried out. This project was inspired by the original plans dating back to the times of Emperor Charles V and by other surviving buildings of the time, like the City Hall of Oudenaarde, which had been designed by the same architect.

    Since the reconstruction was completed in the end of the XIX century, the King's House hosts the City Museum, showing part of the artefacts that the city of Brussels has gathered in the course of the centuries. For most of the tourists, though, the highlight is still the hall consecrated to the Manneken Pis's extensive wardrobe.

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    Broodhuis (Maison du Roi) In English:Breadhouse

    by Martinewezel Written Feb 7, 2008

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    This building was originaly built in 1405 for the bakers selling their bread. Later it became the place of the law court. Contrary to the meaning of the French name, it has never been the King's house. Not talking about the Belgian King, but about the Spanish King.
    Belgium got it's independence in 1830 and is only 178 years old.

    Nowadays it's a museum about the history of Brussels. Rather static, but the paintings, tapestries and scultptures are fine examples of old art.

    One of the floors houses Manneken Pis' extensive wardrobe. He must have about 780 different suits, mostly a donation from societies, clubs. A remarkable collection of traditional and other costumes. Worth a look, but nothing extraordinary.

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    The Changing names of the King's House

    by scottishvisitor Updated Jun 7, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Maison du Roi or King's House was in the late 12th. century a wooden building called the Broodhuis it was from here the bakers sold their bread. The 15th. century saw a new building emerge this time called 't Hertogenhuis - the Duke's House although no Dukes ever lived here. This house was demolished when the clay foundations collapsed. On the occassion of the 3rd. re build it was re - christened The King's House by order of Philip ll King of Spain. Again demolished then rebuilt between 1873 - 1896 this time built much more lavishly with Belgian lime stone and blue stone it kept its Royal name - a fitting title for such a majestic building. The first time we saw the King's house was late afternoon with failing light - we just had to return to see it in sunshine.
    Opening times Tuesday - Friday 10.00 - 17.00 Weekends & Holidays 10.00 - 13.00 admission price 2.48 euro adult 1.98 euro group minimum 12 guided tours only.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    King's Housek on Market Square

    by Martin_S. Written Nov 28, 2006

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    The King's House is a very impressive structure, almost "fit for a King" you might say, facing into Market Square which also includes the Grand Palace and many Guild Houses. You can read more about how this "house" had its very humble beginnings at the website.

    King's Housek on Market Square, Brussels King's Housek on Market Square, Brussels
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    La Maison du Roi

    by traveloturc Written Aug 5, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This building is called King’s House in French, but no king has ever lived there. In Flemish it is more appropriately called Broodhuis (Bread House), attesting to the fact that at one time it used to be the Bakers’ Hall. It was subsequently rebuilt to house the administrative offices of Charles V. It is here that the martyrs of the Reformation, Henry Voes and Jean Van Eschen as well as Egmont and Hornes were executed. Today, it hosts the Museum of the City of Brussels.

    la maison du roi

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Maison du Roi (King’s House)

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 11, 2006

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    This fine building lies directly opposite the Hotel de Ville on the eastern side of the Grand Place. It was built between 1515-1536 on the orders of Charles V, which is how it derived its name, but redesigned in 1873. It was once the residence of ruling Spanish monarchs but now is home to the Musee de la Ville, which includes 16th century paintings, tapestries and the 400 tiny outfits for Manneken Pis.

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  • viddra's Profile Photo

    The King's House

    by viddra Updated Sep 9, 2005

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    The building opposite the Town Hall was originally the covered bread market. In the 14th century it was replaced by a building belonging to the Duke of Brabant. At the time of Charles V, the house was rebuilt.
    Despite its name, no king ever lived here.

    The building used to be a state prison, but now houses the museum of the City of Brussels.

    the king's house night view
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  • Polly74's Profile Photo

    Maison du Roi

    by Polly74 Written Apr 14, 2005

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    At the Market Place, opposite the Town Hall, stands another of the remarkable historical Buildings of Brussels. The beautiful neo-gothic building with its many decorative statues is the "Maison du Roi" in French or "Broodhuis" in Dutch. It now harbours the historical City Museum.

    The Dutch name "Broodhuis" (i.e. bread house) clearly shows what the origins of this building were. In the beginning of the 13th century a wooden construction stood here. It was used by the bakers to sell their bread.

    On June the 2nd 1887 the King's House became the City Museum of Brussels On exhibition are original statues of the town hall, paintings, wall tapestries and different artifacts which have a relation to the history of the city.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    The King's House

    by Blatherwick Updated Aug 28, 2004

    The building currently houses the Museum of Brussels. On the second floor of the museum you can check out the wardrobes of the Manneken Pis (that silly pissing boy statue).

    Interestingly, the King never lived in this building. the orignial building here was a bread house that dated back to the 13th century. Later this became the house of a Duke of Brabant and was built up in Gothic archetecture. The building was destroyed by the French and was rebuilt from scratch in 1861.

    The King's House
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  • belgianchocolate's Profile Photo

    Het broodhuis.

    by belgianchocolate Updated May 26, 2004

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    Already in the 13th century there was a building
    on the site where the 'Broodhuis' is located.

    The name in English is 'the king's house'.
    Translated from french 'maison du roi'
    The dutch 'broodhuis' is much more historical.
    The first building on this site was a wooden
    barrack where the bakers sold there bread.
    'Broodhuis' means bread-house.

    In 1515 'Emperor Karel' , at that time still
    'Duke Karel' instructed to rebuild the
    'broodhuis' in flamboyant gothic style.

    The 5th of june 1568 the earls 'Egmont and Hoorn'
    spend their last night in this building before their
    execution on the 'grote markt'-'grand place'.
    They now got their statue on the 'kleine Zavel'
    -'petit Sablon'.

    The building got sold and bought and sold...
    In the year 1860 the city bought it and it was
    in very poor state at the time.
    The decided to rebuild it... Break it down stone
    by stone and restore it completely.

    Only the long history of the building , apart
    from its beauty makes it amazing.
    All the statues in the facade tell the story
    about Brussels , Belgium.

    In 1887 it became the cities museum.
    You can see old paintings , engravings ,
    Also 'manneke pis' outfits are exhibited
    here....

    Have a look at the website
    Most defenitely worth a visit.

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  • Maison du Roi

    by CoAir13 Written May 18, 2004

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    Interesting history. From a wooden structure where bread was sold to becoming the stone house of the Duke of Brabant to being destroyed and finally being rebuilt from scratch beginning in 1861.
    Worth a walk through....doesn't take long.

    Tues. - Fri. 10-5
    Weekends and Holidays 10-1
    Closed mondays
    2,50 EUR

    Maison du Roi
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  • Imbi's Profile Photo

    The King’s House

    by Imbi Written May 12, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness



    It is also known as Broodhuys ( Bread House). It is not very old building but it’s history goes long time ago. When baker of Brussels stopped selling bread from stall they started selling it from here. Later it was occupied by collector and than Duke. Although king never lived here but it is still called Kings House.


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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Het Broodhuis

    by mvtouring Written Apr 21, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    At the Market Place, opposite the Town Hall, stands another of the remarkable historical THE KING'S HOUSE (a.k.a "Het Broodhuis" or "La maison du roi")

    Buildings of Brussels. The beautiful neo-gothic building with its many decorative statues is the "Maison du Roi" in French or "Broodhuis" in Dutch. It now harbours the historical City Museum.
    The Dutch name "Broodhuis" (i.e. bread house) clearly shows what the origins of this building were. In the beginning of the 13th century a wooden construction stood here. It was used by the bakers to sell their bread. In 1405 a stone building replaced the original wooden bread hall.

    Was this review helpful?

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