Fun things to do in Mostar

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Mostar

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    Tea Room

    by solopes Updated Dec 4, 2014

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    After the visit of the Muslim side, we crossed the river, to visit the Croat side, and... surprise!

    The Muslim look kept present everywhere, evidencing the mixture before the war.

    Or what should I say, about this tea room in the Croat area?

    Mostar - Bosnia and Herzegovina
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    Impressive old village

    by shavy Updated Aug 23, 2014

    Once I step out the car and I looked at the top of the fortress, I say oh boy I'm gonna climb up there? How many stairs do I have to step. On the steps leading to the fort's main tower, there was a section, which offered great views of the entire village. It was superb. Every step you do and turn around you'll have a great views to the village, it was not really hard steps you can do it at your own pace and besides, there are so many interest on the way to the top

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    Hajji Alija Mosque

    by shavy Written Aug 23, 2014

    This village also on the list of Unesco heritage the same as the old town, which I didn't know. Well, its good to be true, anyway, the mosque here is less impressive than the one old town. On the front door there was a man selling souvenir also collect entrance fee for the mosque

    The Hajji Alija Mosque (built in 1563, destroyed in August 1993, reconstructed in 2005) ) was one of the prominent sights in the village. The mosque had excellent acoustics.

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    Discover more in this medieval village

    by shavy Written Aug 23, 2014

    It was relatively easy to get to, as it lay on the main road to Mostar. Pocitelj was small but it also photogenic if you keep on climbing at your own pace and relax sometimes it would cover everything, including climbing both ends of the ruins, taking pictures, relaxing on a couple of terraces and enjoying the views, and inspecting the great mosque and a couple of significant houses

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    Pocitelj

    by shavy Written Aug 23, 2014

    This medieval village is on the way to Mostar if you came from the border of Croatia just a few minutes drive. Worth to stop by to see the locals life. Is very steps to go up if you really want to see the tower and the mosque. Enjoy a leisurely paced walking around its UNESCO World Heritage-listed center, and stop to look at historical landmarks like the Haji-Ali Mosque and Sahat-kula a clock tower fort on top of the hill above the town

    This places is less touristy comparing to the old town of Mostar. Many of the local selling souvenir. Some of them sitting with their stuffs on the staircase on the way to the top where visitors go. Is a right place to do that, while some of the visitors take some rest for awhile from the stairs

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    This you have to walk to get to the Stari Most

    by shavy Written Aug 13, 2014

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    The Stari Most is much more than a tourist attraction for the locals. They represent perseverance, forgiveness and pain. The old bridge is known as the bridge that connects two war-torn populations reconciles. If you walk over it, feel like you're not going anywhere and besides, standing in the middle of this bridge you'll have the view to the both side of town. And this bridge is one of the main way to the other side, so, hundreds of people crossed this bridge in all type of nationalities young and old

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    Strolling around

    by shavy Written Aug 13, 2014

    Tourism is well on this way that your brand to the amount of shops that all sell knickknacks that we do not want and many more that can please the visitors. The rebuilding of the bridge and the Turkish quarter and the place on the World Heritage List to symbolize a new beginning, but a visit to Mostar makes clear that there is still a long way to go

    The border between Croatia and Bosnia - Hercegovina is not the problem, and show only a formality. It is the town itself. Despite the beautiful facades and special bridge there's a haze over it. Maybe not if you stay at the bridge, but if you look a little further, because the scars of war are visible and palpable

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    Going down under the old bridge

    by shavy Updated Aug 13, 2014

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    You must cross the bridge if you like to stroll the other side of town, the first thing we've done is going down to the bridge. There were a small way down near the restaurants .
    Many people coming down here just setting and relax or picture taking. Also a perfect spot to have a complete photo of the old bridge.

    Besides, the bridge is like a circus for tourism, the daredevils of the Mostar Diving Club off the bridge, they do so only when they have enough picked up at the tourist money. If you are standing below down the bridge you can see them easily from height till landed into water

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    The Mosque

    by shavy Updated Aug 13, 2014

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    There are several mosques in the old city, a number you can visit but here were only a few where you can climb up the minaret for a nice view over the city. With a small fee you climb to the top in a very small stairs, if you have no fear of heights this might be for you. Once you get to the top you have a beautiful view

    The weather was too hot that day but we intend to climb anyway, is something you should do if you visit a place like this. Up there is not much of a space around, we're lucky there weren't many climbers. If you standing from the bridge you have a pretty nice photo of the mosque. The green water beyond and the building were perfect. The mosque is beautiful to admire from the outside, I found the interior less that that.

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    Clock Tower

    by HORSCHECK Updated Aug 23, 2013

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    The construction of the 15 m high Clock Tower (Sahat Kula) in the early 17th century was financed by the prosperous citizen Fatima Šariæ. Since 1838 it was home to a bell weighing 250 kg which could be heard far outside the town.

    The Clock Tower was seriously damaged during the war, but reconstructed in 1999.

    Directions:
    The Clock Tower can be found opposite to the Herzegovina Museum in the east part of Mostar's old town.

    Address: Clock Tower, Bajatova b.b., Mostar

    Clock Tower (Sahat Kula) Clock Tower (Sahat Kula) Clock Tower (Sahat Kula)
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    Kravice Falls: Nice for Nature Lovers

    by gilabrand Updated Aug 21, 2013

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    In June, we drove to Kravice Falls from Dubrovnik (passing through 3 checkpoints). This is not a trip for anyone who suffers from the heat or has trouble with walking and climbing steps. You reach the falls after driving for a long time down a mostly deserted road (wondering whether you are going the right way). When you finally get there, you will have about 100 steps to walk down (and then up again) from the parking lot - and that does not include a steep descent to the falls themselves.

    There was no public transportation that we could discern - and no toilets anywhere, although we did see a snack bar. It was boiling hot. Admission is free.

    We saw some people splashing around in the falls, which are quite spectacular, surrounded by lush greenery, but we plopped ourselves down under some bushes before getting to the bottom, in a place with a good view of the falls, and had a little picnic (bring something to sit on if you do this - it is rocky and muddy).

    The way down was crowded with tourists and workers rolling wheelbarrows up and down the mountain.

    Kravice Falls: 28 meters high
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    Gymnazija (Grammar School)

    by Airpunk Written Aug 7, 2013

    Though the school moved into the building in 1898 already, it was only completed in 1902. The building has some Austrian art nouvaeu features but is rather marked by neo-moorish elements. Its style, colour and size stand out between all the other buildings in the city. The building is the masterpiece at Spanish Square (Spanski Trg) which was redesigned for this building. The building didn't suffer as much from the war as some neighbouring buildings – and due to its nature and background was one of the frist to be reconstrcuted.
    Since its opening it has been a school for the elite. There is are two separate curriculums offered – a Bosnian and a Croat one. Obviously, the separations caused through the war have left its scars.

    Gymnazija (Grammar School)
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    Ruins and former front line

    by Airpunk Written Aug 7, 2013

    18 years after the end of the war, there are still many war ruins in Mostar. These are bombed and burned out buildings which still haven't been reconstructed. There are some famous buildings which are still waiting to be rebuilt (or torn down), like the New Serbian Orthodox Church or the one with the bogomil tomb motifs on the Muslim side – you will see war ruins all over the city. The highest concentration of them can be found at the former front line which ran along Bulevar and Kolodvorska strets. If you are interested in those buildings, do not forget to have a look at the former Neretva Hotel next to the Mostarskog Bataljone bridge and the parking deck close to Kralja Zvonimira and the park.

    P.S.: Don't even think of exploring such a building from inside on your own. There may be parts falling down and even some dangerous remains from the bombings and shootings.

    Neretva Hotel, Mostar One of many war ruins in Mostar More war ruins War ruins, Mostar War ruins, Mostar
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    Catholic Church

    by Airpunk Written Aug 7, 2013

    Mostar's Catholic church (St. Peter & Paul) was built in 1866 in neoromanesque style. In 1992, during the Balkan Wars, it was destroyed - but when it was reconstructed, it was also enlarged and appears a little out of size. The belltower was also extended after the war (finished in 2000) to its present size in a time when ethnic and nationalistic tones were very present. It was build to outsize the minarets of the mosques on the other side of the Neretva.

    Catholic Side
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    New Orthodox Church (Cathedral)

    by Airpunk Written Aug 7, 2013

    The Cathedral of the Holy Trinity, better known as New Orthodox Church, was once a splendid church building, known beyond the city. It was finished in 1873 in a neo-byzantine style. It has a typicial cruciform ground shape and a high belltower.Like many other buildings, it was destroyed in the Balkan Wars of the early 1990s. As a symbol of the serbs, it was even blown up later on. Its reconstruction was often postponed, in 2013 I saw that at least something is happening. Thanks to Holger (Horscheck) we were able to see the progresses by comparing what I saw to pictures from 2008. As of 2013, the area is fenced off so that there are few good photo opportunities trough the fence. And the ruins only give you an idea of the former glory. Still, I think it is worth to climb up.

    New Orthodox Church (Cathedral)
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