Fun things to do in Sarajevo

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Sarajevo

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    The Latin Bridge

    by etfromnc Updated Apr 16, 2014

    When Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria was assassinated in Sarajevo on 28 June 1914, few would have imagined the carnage that would follow. Ferdinand was targeted by a revolutionary movement known as Young Bosnia, and his death was the catalyst that led Austria-Hungary to declare war on Serbia.
    Germany, allied to Austria-Hungary, soon joined the fray. The spot of Ferdinand’s death was close to the Latin Bridge which crosses over the Miljacka River in the heart of the city, and a small plaque commemorates the event. So much has happened in Sarajevo in the intervening century that there is very little pomp and ceremony related to this site (plus the fact that it is a black spot in the history of a wonderful and historic city), but for budding historians a visit here is a definite must on the ultimate WWI pilgrimage.

    The Latin Bridge
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    Memorial to the Children

    by Dabs Written Aug 7, 2013

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    Along with the damage you can still see to the building, the war is also remembered with a memorial to the children who died in the war, some 1,600 of them. Their names are listed near the memorial, if you look at it you can see the prints of children who helped to create this memorial

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    The Serbian Orthodox Cathedral

    by IreneMcKay Written Aug 6, 2013

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    This cathedral is set on a lovely little park with a sculpture representing peace and a huge chess set. Several people were crowded around enjoying a game when we visited. The church was damaged during the war. The church was built in 1869. The park also had a craft market during our visit.

    The Orthodox Cathedral Enjoying the sun. A large game of chess.
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    Cemetery near Yellow Fort

    by IreneMcKay Updated Aug 5, 2013

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    From the Yellow Fort you look down onto a large cemetery sloping down the hill. There are some older Ottoman style graves with turbans on top, but most of the graves date from the siege of Sarajevo. All the graves are well-tended white columns and many of them are covered in roses. It is a beautiful and peaceful place but obviously comes from a terrible and tragic period of Sarajevo's history.

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    The Yellow Fort

    by IreneMcKay Updated Aug 5, 2013

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    We walked up to the Yellow Fort. The route up passes some interesting shop fronts, then lots of cemeteries. It is a very steep climb. There is not much left of the fort itself just the broken outer walls. However, there is a great view from this location over the river and the old town.

    If you exit the fort and turn right instead of back down the steep slope, then follow this street to the end, then turn left, you will go down through one of the old city gates and then get back down to the bottom of the cemetery.

    The view is definitely worth going to see but because it is so steep climbing up before the heat of the day would be a good idea.

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    Franciscan Church

    by HORSCHECK Updated Jul 19, 2013

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    The Franciscan Church (Sv. Ante Franjevacka) was completed during the Austro-Hungarian period in 1914 on the site of an even earlier church. It serves the local Catholic community.

    The church was designed by Josip Vancas and built in neo-gothic style, which is quite a contrast to the Ottoman architecture in Sarajevo's historic old town (Bascarsija).

    Direction:
    The Franciscan Church can be found opposite to the Sarajevo brewery (Sarajevska Pivara) on the south side of the river Mijacka.

    Address: Franciscan Church, Franjevacka 6, Sarajevo

    Franciscan Church Franciscan Church Inside the Franciscan Church
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    New Synagogue

    by HORSCHECK Updated Jul 18, 2013

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    The New Synagogue, which is also known as Ashkenazi Synagogue, was designed by the architect Karl Parik in Neo-Moorish style.

    It was completed at the beginning of the 20th century and is nowadays the only functioning synagogue in Sarajevo.

    Directions:
    The New Synagogue is situated on the left bank of the river Miljacka, just at the eastern end of the street Hamdije Kresevljakovica.

    Address: New Synagogue, Hamdije Kresevljakovica 59, Sarajevo

    New Synagogue New Synagogue
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    Memorial to Murdered Children of Sarajevo

    by Avieira67 Updated Jun 26, 2013

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    This memorial, made of bronze ring, is a masterpiece of the sculptoris Mensud Keèo. It was erected on 9th May 2009, day of victory over facism.
    The bronze ring was made of bombshell cases and other kinds of weapons. Bombshell cases were collected after the war. Then, they were melted and were poured into ring. On the ring children footsteps were inprinted.
    Two separate glass sculptures in the middle represent mother and child. The mother is trying to protect her child.
    From 1992 to 1995, during the siege of Sarajevo, more than 1.300 children lost their life.

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    The Yellow Bastion

    by Avieira67 Updated Jun 23, 2013

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    At the time of the Banate of Bosnia, in the early 12th century, the Hodidjed (old town) existed, and the fortress flourished during the Ottoman rule. However, after the devastation by Prince Eugene of Savoy, in 1697, the fortress was completely reconstructed, from 1729 to 1739.
    Some important structures from that period are three tower gates, kapi-kule, at Višegrad, Širokac and Ploca, and five garrisons, tabija. Of particular importance was Bijela Tabija, which arose from the Hodidjed, and Žuta Tabija, which was completed in 1809.
    To reach this bastion, one can take the bus 51 in central Bascarsija. Anyway, it is a short ride and you can go easily on foot. For a shortcut, cross the Martyr Kovaci Cemetery.
    From this bastion you have a great view of Sarajevo.

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    The White Bastion

    by Avieira67 Updated Jun 23, 2013

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    At the time of the Banate of Bosnia, in the early 12th century, the Hodidjed (old town) existed, and the fortress flourished during the Ottoman rule. However, after the devastation by Prince Eugene of Savoy, in 1697, the fortress was completely reconstructed, from 1729 to 1739.
    Some important structures from that period are three tower gates, kapi-kule, at Višegrad, Širokac and Ploca, and five garrisons, tabija. Of particular importance was Bijela Tabija, which arose from the Hodidjed, and Žuta Tabija, which was completed in 1809.
    To reach this bastion, I advise you to catch the bus 51 in central Bascarsija. It is not too far away, but one has to climb.
    I visited both White and Yellow Bastions to have a view of Sarajevo. I must say, the view from the first one is more interesting.

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    The Presidency Building

    by Avieira67 Updated Jun 23, 2013

    This building was build from 1884 to 1886, according to the Renaissance style, by the architect Josip Vancaš. It became the headquarters of the Austro-Hungarian regime in the area, housing government and military departments, as well as law courts and ceremonial rooms.
    Since 1996, the building has been used as the official residence of the collective Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

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    Despića Kuća / The Despic House

    by BlueLlama Updated May 23, 2013

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    This house, not especially captivating from the outside, is located on Obala Kulina Bana, the street that runs along the northern bank of the Miljacka River. You could easily walk by without really noticing it, but it is deserving of a proper visit. While the city outside may be busy, there is a wonderful sense of calm inside. The oldest part of the house, which was owned by several generations of a wealthy Serb merchant family, dates back the the 17th century, with the property growing over time.

    The period decoration, mainly 19th and early 20th century, is very interesting to anyone more used to seeing homes from this era in Europe or north America as it is subtly different. What is most fascinating, however, is the blend of European and Eastern styles. Sarajevo as a whole is a mix of Muslim, Orthodox and Catholic, east and West, but visiting this house brings home how this translates to the personal level. This is how a Christian family lived in an Ottoman outpost in Europe.

    The ground floors are dark, with a very Turkish feel. Seating is low and composed of wall to wall sofas. There are separate rooms for male and female members of the family. Upstairs is light and bright, mainly furnished in a European style with hand-printed wallpaper and ornate furniture. There are some personal effects on display, but unfortunately most of the signage is in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian.

    Tickets cost 3 Bosnian marka.

    Exterior of the Despic House
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    Tunnel tour and museum with Sarajevo Insider

    by BlueLlama Written Apr 2, 2013

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    Among all the must-see things to experience in Sarajevo, the so-called Tunnel of Life constructed under the airport during the siege of the early 90s easily tops the list.

    We opted to go as part of a tour operated by Sarajevo Insider, one of a couple of outfits offering this type of excursion, and I'm glad we chose them. Firstly, the siege and the tunnel itself was put into context during our guide, Adnan's thorough and enthusiastic explanation of the buildings and monuments we passed on our way towards the airport. Secondly, since we are not fortunate enough to have any Bosnian friends or family, hearing about the siege and life during it from Adnan gave us a local insight we wouldn't have had otherwise.

    The first part of the tour is a bus drive from the departure point close to the Latin Bridge down the main road towards the airport (part of which was once the infamous Sniper Alley), where we got information and observations on Sarajevo's communist past and saw striking examples of building from that period. This stretch of road contains a number of buildings which became icons of the siege, most notably the Holiday Inn and the Bosnian parliament building. Happily, both are now defiantly pristine and open for business.

    And then you are at the house from which the tunnel starts to see footage of its construction and use, and to walk a very small length of the tunnel itself. Adnan provided more explanations, but we also had time to wander around ourselves. The museum is run by the family who owned the house at the time the tunnel was built and who still do, and is filled with newspaper cuttings of articles about it from around the world.

    Time to return to Sarajevo, with Adnan telling us some local jokes to lift the mood (I'm not sure if it was the subject matter of the trip, although actually the story of the tunnel is very inspiring, or the rather subdued group we were with!) and point out a couple of final points of interest.

    The tunnel is a great experience (in the current absence of the main city museum, it was the only place we found we could learn much about the siege, frustratingly), and Sarajevo Insider are a professional, punctual and friendly company. Adnan was knowledgeable and very personable. My only regret is that we didn't go on the longer Sarajevo Insider tour, Times of Misfortune, which also visits the tunnel. Maybe next time. Oh, and that we didn't have any questions for Adnan when he asked. I thought of plenty afterwards.

    At EUR 15/BAM 30 a head and a visit time of around two hours, this is good value and a simple, rewarding way to visit Sarajevo's unique Tunnel of Life.

    The Tunnel Museum Sarajevo airport tunnel The view from the house to the airport Apartment buildings
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  • What Time Is It?

    by Jetgirly Written Nov 4, 2012

    The Bascarsija neighbourhood is home to many Sarajevo landmarks, including the clock tower. Like many of the nearby buildings it was built by Gazi Husrev-bey, and today someone still ascends the tower weekly to adjust the clock and ensure it is accurate. During Ramadan local Muslims listen for the chiming of this clock to announce when their daily fasting may end.

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  • Twisty Tower

    by Jetgirly Written Nov 4, 2012

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    The Avaz Twist Tower is a Sarajevo landmark. Built in 2008 in the commercial district, this tower rises 176 metres over the city and is beautifully lit at night. There is a public viewing platform in the tower that offers visitors a look at the city from above.

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