Sarajevo Transportation

  • Inside the tram 1
    Inside the tram 1
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  • Transportation
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  • Transportation
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Best Rated Transportation in Sarajevo

  • Jasen71's Profile Photo

    Seriously lacking roads

    by Jasen71 Updated Sep 12, 2005

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    In winter when road conditions can deteriorate rapidly. During winter and spring, black ice and landslides can make road conditions particularly hazardous. Drivers should exercise extreme caution. Road conditions are still poor, but many roads are now being restored. The safety and condition of urban roads is generally okay, but rural road maintenance is seriously lacking. The picture I have taken is of a metal replacement bridge, and ice and metal aren't really a good mix.

    Don't touch the breaks
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  • Krumlovgirl's Profile Photo

    Trams

    by Krumlovgirl Updated Jan 4, 2005

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    Sarajevo has a really great tram system that makes a circle around the center. You can board it from the bus or train station and it even runs out to some of the suburbs like Grbvacia. It stops right by the fountain in the old town and in front of other places such as the Holiday Inn and National Museum. A word of warning, however. Make sure that you not only buy the correct ticket, but also validate it once inside the tram. Plain clothes policeman frequently hop on board to check tickets and you could face a hefty fine if yours isn't validated.

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  • Krumlovgirl's Profile Photo

    Train

    by Krumlovgirl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I have taken both the bus and the train from Sarajevo to Zagreb and honestly, neither one is that great. The train took longer and was cold and a little on the worn side, but the bus was kind of cramped. At least it stopped for breaks though. If you want to take the train, it takes 9 hours and the best route leaves at 8:00 am and arrives in Zagreb at 5:00 pm.

    The website I have listed below is not an official sight, but it does have schedules.

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Trams 'n' taxis

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Mar 30, 2010

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    Although you'll amost certainly spend most of your time walking around Sarajevo, you'll find the city's public transport system both cheap and efficient when you want to go further afield.

    We found taxis reasonably priced and had no problems with tricky drivers as we came from the airport and went to the station, journeys that are all too often a tourist trap unfortunately, although one driver refused to take us on the short but steep run up to the Yellow Bastion (we wanted to walk back, he said it wasn't worth it to him unless we paid for him to wait and come back) another fellow was quick to approach us, saying cheerfully, "A fare's a fare. 5KM's better than nothing" - we liked his attitude so tipped him well.

    Our taxi from the airport set his meter - not always the case apparently, it seems the taxis at the airport have a special dispensation that allows them to negotiate a fare. The meter showed 30KM at the end of our ride, a fare we were quite happy to pay - and the same amount that VTer Horscheck has since told ne me he paid to get to the same hotel a couple of weeks earlier.

    Earlier visitors to Sarajevo have commented on old and rather beaten up taxis - we noticed many of them were new vehicles - another sign of things improving here.

    The lie of the land means the trams all run east-west in a one-way loop through the immediate city centre and branch out a bit at either end. If you buy your tickets from a kiosk rather than from the driver, you'll save a bit ( 1.60KM instead of 1.80KM when we were there, October 2008), just be sure to validate them when you get on. The machine's at the front and the trams can be very crowded so get on at the front unless you up to pushing. Tickets are only valid for a one-way trip and if you change trams you'll need another ticket. There are frequent checks by tram inspectors. You can buy a day card, but you probably won't need it.

    There's a main tram stop near Sebilj Square and another at the train station. The trams start at 6am and run until late.

    Old trams Slightly newer Very new Newer taxis

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  • Rusket's Profile Photo

    Bus station

    by Rusket Updated Jun 5, 2006

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    There are buses to "everywhere" from here, for instance Oslo :-) There are more local lines, too, to other cities in Bosnia and the other Balkan countries.

    The bus station is situated next to the train station, at the end of tram line 1.

    You should always go here to check departure times, cause they change often. There are more departures / arrivals in the tourist season. Like Dubrovnik: One daily this time of the year, three during summer. And it is smart to buy your tickets a day in advance.

    The linked page is i bosnian. Explanations:

    svaki dan = every day
    ponedeljak = monday
    utorak = tuesday
    srijeda = wednesday
    cetvrtak = thursday
    petak = friday
    subota = saturday
    nedelja = sunday
    praznik = holiday
    ne saobraca = is not traficated

    The grammatical ending "-om" in this case means "on"; utorkom = on tuesdays

    Sarajevo bus station Fountain in front of bus station / train station
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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Explore Sarajevo on foot

    by HORSCHECK Updated Sep 26, 2010

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    Although Sarajevo with its more than 300.000 inhabitans is almost a big city, the city centre is still very walkable.

    Most of the main sights are in walking distance to the historic old town (Bascarsija).

    Especially in the old part of the city are many pedestrianised streets or pathways which are not accessible to cars or public transportation anyway.

    Outside the old town there is a good network of trams and buses which leads you back to the city centre in case you are lost.

    Explore Sarajevo on foot
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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    To Sarajevo by plane

    by HORSCHECK Updated Sep 26, 2010

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    I arrived in Sarajevo by plane from Cologne in Germany. Sarajevo International Airport is located in the suburb Butmir, about 7 km southwest of the city centre.

    With slightly less than 600.000 passengers per year, it is the biggest aiport in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Inside the terminal building you find just the necessary facilities, such as a cash point (ATM), an exchange office, a post office and a kiosk.

    Please read my "From the airport to the city by taxi" tip for info how to get to town from the airport.

    Website: http://www.sarajevo-airport.ba/

    Sarajevo Airport
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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    To Sarajevo by train

    by HORSCHECK Updated Sep 26, 2010

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    We left Sarajevo by train to Mostar. There are two daily trains serving this route; which leads to Ploce in Croatia.

    The trains leave Sarajevo in the early morning (06:45 h) and in the early evening (18:18 h).

    Sarajevo's train station (Zeljenicka stancia) has only about a dozen train departures per day. These include Ploce and Zagreb in Croatia, Budapest in Hungary and some local towns like Zenica and Konjic.

    Tickets can be bought at the train station. In September 2008 a single ticket Sarajevo - Mostar cost 9,90 KM.

    The train station is located about 1,5 km west of the touristy city centre (Bascarsija). There is a tram stop just in front of the train station building. Tram #1 serves a route from here to the city centre.

    Website: http://www.zfbh.ba/

    Train to Mostar at Sarajevo station Sarajevo train station (Zeljenicka stancia) Signs at Sarajevo train station Sarajevo train station (Zeljenicka stancia) Inside Sarajevo train station (Zeljenicka stancia)
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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Leaving Sarajevo

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Jan 5, 2012

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    Leaving Sarajevo for Split in Croatia, we decided to take the train.

    Good choice!

    It was a great train ride, through wonderful scenery, mountains, the Neretva River Gorge and on through the Neretva Delta to Ploce on the Croation coast.

    Leaving dead on time at 6.45am from Sarajevo station, we pulled in to Ploce right on time, at 10.20am as per the timetable. The station was eerily deserted when we arrived, no problems finding the right platform here - there was only the one train waiting along with a handful of passengers.

    Bosnia's railways are slowly recovering from the war, all the rolling stock is superannuated European stuff donated by various countries - the carriages on our train were all from Sweden, a little tired maybe but clean and comfortable. With so few passengers - in our entire carriage there were only 3 compartments occupied - us, a threesome of Aussie backpackers and an elderly fellow with his creel and fishing rods - you shouldn't have to worry about not getting a seat!

    We rolled out of Sarajevo in the pre-dawn light, the sun only cresting over the mountains behind us when we were quite some way on our journey. The light on the autumn leaves of the mountainside trees was magical. Crossing the mountains via a seemingly endless series of switchbacks, viaducts and tunnels was stunning. Once down from the mountains we travelled the length of the Neretva Gorge, stopping briefly at small stations to pick up workers as we approached Mostar where our backpackers left us. A longer stop at Mostar and then we were on our way again, more lovely scenery as the train wound around beside the river, passing the minaret and towers of Pocitelj on the other side of the water before we reached the border.

    The briefest of border formalities were conducted on the train and then it was out into the waving green reed beds, channels, vineyards, orchards and market gardens of the delta. Most of the remaining passengers had alighted by the time we arrived in Ploce - the man with the fishing was the only other passenger apart from us.

    The bus station is right beside the train station, and with buses between Dubrovnik and Split no more than half an hour apart throughout the day, there was just enough time to walk across to the bank on the other side of the park outside the bus station to get some Croatian currency, buy our ticket and a doorstop of a cheese sandwich for the lunch on the bus, and we were on our way to Split.

    Trains are great for the freedom they give you to move around, look back at where you've come from (with all those switchbacks, the views back were as good as those looking forward) and, on such an empty train, spread yourself around. All told, the journey took no longer than the bus would have done and was much more fun I'm sure. So good in fact, we're already planning to do the Zagreb - Sarajevo trip some time.

    Practicalities: The fare was 21.90KM. We went to the station the day before we left and bought our tickets, just to suss the place out and allow an extra five minutes in bed in the morning.

    Bring cold drinks and food with you. Coffee (thick, black and Bosnian) was available

    All the carriages had clean and functioning toilets.

    With departure times from Ploce set at 6am and just before 5pm, the journey from Ploce to Sarajevo is not such an attractive option. The morning one is too early to feasibly get there from anywhere that wasn't right on Ploces's doorstep (Ploce is about halfway between Split and Dubrovnik) and catching the train in the evening would, for much of the year, mean travelling through the most spectacular section of the journey (Mostar to Sarajevo) after dark.

    2012 is set to see a spanking new, Talgo-type train on this route. "Spring" is the hoped-for time of completion, but I don't know that I'd make any definite plans just yet. Meantime, the line is closed as the necessary engineering work is completed before this new rolling stock can begin to run.

    Am I awake yet? All for ourselves Down through the mountains ... and through the Neretva Gorge Beautiful!
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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    From the airport to the city by taxi

    by HORSCHECK Updated Sep 26, 2010

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    Unfortunately, in September 2008 there was no public transportation from the airport to the city centre. So the only possibility to get to town was a taxi.

    Taxis can be found just in front of the terminal building. Guidebooks list about 25 KM (ca. 12,5 Euro) as a sensible price for the about 12 to 15 km long taxi ride to the city centre.

    The website of the company "Sarajevo Taxi" states a fare of 1 KM per kilometre and a starting price of 1,50 KM.

    Some guidebooks also list an additional price of 2 KM for luggage.

    We took a taxi from the airport to our accomodation Halvat Guesthouse, which is situated just at the eastern end of the historic old town (Bascarsija).

    We agreed on a price of 30 KM, which at that time seemed to be reasonable to us. Taking the above facts into account it was probably a bit of a tourist rip off, although still reasonable for western standards.

    If you don't have much luggage and are well prepared than you can walk about 800 metres to the suburb of Dobrinja from where there are trolleybuses and trams to the city centre.

    Website: http://www.sarajevotaxi.com.ba/

    Sarajevo Taxi Taxi stand at the train station Sarajevo Taxi
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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Explore Sarajevo by public transport

    by HORSCHECK Written Sep 26, 2010

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    The public transport in Sarajevo is operated by the company GRAS and consists of trams, buses and trolleybuses.

    Tickets can be bought from kiosks. There are basic single tickets for 1,60 KM as well as 2, 5 and 10 journey tickets with slight discounts. A day ticket sets you back 5,40 KM.

    A single ticket can also be bought from thr driver for 1,80 KM (2008). On entering the vehicle the ticket has to be validated.

    Tickets are only valid for one journey, so if you change the vehicle then a new ticket has to be validated.

    Website: http://www.gras.co.ba/

    Sarajevo tram in Ilidza Sarajevo tram in Ilidza Sarajevo tram in Ilidza Sarajevo tram at the train station Sarajevo trolley bus #102
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  • jonathanbarker's Profile Photo

    Railways of Bosnia and Herzogovina (ZFBH)

    by jonathanbarker Written May 26, 2011

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    Sarajevo is roughly in the centre of Bosnia and Herzogovina. The are trains to Mostar (onwards to Southern Croatia), Banja Luka and to Belgrade (Zagreb and Budapest), which pass through some of the most magnificent scenery I have seen. Although infrequent compared with British trains to/from the capital, the trains are generally clean, comfy, although rather old. The journey times are slower than in Britain, but considering the climbs up the mountains it well worth the ride. Train fares are relatively cheap (we took a train to Mostar for about 18km (9 Euro return the journey time being approx 2.5 hrs).
    Please note that we found no catering on board and so we took our own rolls/sandwiches and drinks. As with train travel in Britain, trains can be substituted by road-coaches at weekends due to engineering/track work.

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Ciglane lift

    by HORSCHECK Written Sep 26, 2010

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    When we walked from the Asim Ferhatovic Hase Stadium back to the train station we came through the residential area Ciglane.

    It is located on a steep hill and consists of square residential blocks. In the centre of this area the Ciglane lift can be found. It is also operated by the public transport company GRAS and saves you from climbing more than 400 steps.

    I must admit that we didn't take the lift as we were quite happy to be at the upper end of the lift and continue our walk from there towards the train station.

    Ciglane lift Ciglane lift: Carriage #4 Ciglane lift: Carriage #3 Residential area Ciglane
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  • Rusket's Profile Photo

    Railway Station

    by Rusket Updated Aug 16, 2007

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    It is quite a long walk from downtown Sarajevo to the railway station, along "Sniper Alley" past Hotel Holiday Inn. If you have luggage I would recommend you go by tram no 1. There are some local lines and you can get to / from Croatia and Slovenia, and further from there to other destinations.

    A few connections with Croatia valid 2007:
    - From Zagreb 08:57, to Sarajevo 18:20, to Mostar 20:42, to Capljina 21:17
    - (From Budapest) from Osijek 14:57, to Sarajevo 21:39
    - From Ploce 06:20, Mostar 08:53, to Sarajevo 10:27, to Zagreb 19:47
    - From Ploce 16:50, Mostar 18:29, to Sarajevo 20:44
    - From Sarajevo 07:00, Mostar 09:17, to Ploce 10:51

    For some peculiar reason I was not allowed to photograph inside the railway station building. There are a few restaurants and caffees there, and a tour bus operator in addition to the ticket office. The quality of my main picture is not very good, but I put it up anyway, so you can recognise the building when you see it. Another peculiarity: The sign over the entrance says "Railway Station", in english :-)

    Sarajevo Railway Station Sarajevo Railway Station Sarajevo Railway Station
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  • GyuriFT's Profile Photo

    Sarajevo->Mostar by train

    by GyuriFT Written Mar 12, 2008

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    There are trains. They go as far as the end of the line (Ploce in Croatia) on the Adriatic coast.
    The train ride between Sarajevo and Mostar is spectacular.

    Pre-booking is not necessary and from most countries not possible. If it would be, it would add unnecessary costs.
    Just go!

    According HAFAS database but also double-checked with http://www.zrs-rs.com/redvoznje.php:

    train #391 departs Sarajevo at 06:45, arrives Mostar 09:04
    train #397 departs Sarajevo at 18:18, arrives Mostar 20:47

    train #396 departs Mostar at 07:38, arrives Sarajevo 10:02
    train #390 departs Mostar at 18:40, arrives Sarajevo 20:59

    The trains do not look bad, but of course nothing to reserve or book!
    UK is anyway one of the worst place to buy Continental European tickets.
    Forget the booking, buy in Sarajevo.

    http://www.railfaneurope.net/pix/ba/car/pix.html

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