Nesebar Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Stine620
  • Things to Do
    by Stine620
  • Things to Do
    by Stine620

Most Recent Things to Do in Nesebar

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    The church of Saint Sofia ( Old Mitropolia )

    by desert_princess Updated Sep 5, 2012

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    The church of Saint Sofia ( Old Mitropolia ) is located in what is supposed to have been the center of the ancient city. It is a three-naved unvaulted basilica with a semi-circular apse, a narthex and an atrium. The church has a total length of 25.5 m and a width of 13 m. The division into three naves was effected by two rows of five pillars each. The middle nave (9.3 m wide) ends to the east with a big closed apse, round outside and three-sided inside. There are three arched windows on the eastern wall above the apse. The basilica used to have a double-sloped roof which has not been preserved. From the inside the church used to be plastered and then painted with frescoes. The whole floor used to be covered with mosaics made out with little coloured stones. It has mixed masonry of stone and brick and is the largest of the Nesebar churches whose overground structure has survived.
    The basilica was constructed in the late 5th and early 6th century. Its present appearance was dated from the beginning of the 9th century when it was reconstructed. During the Middle Ages it served as a cathedral for the bishopric eparchy centered in Nesebar. In 1257 the church was looted by the Venetians during a campaign against the Bulgarian Empire and many religious relics were taken in the Church of San Salvatore in Venice. The basilica was abandoned in the 18th century.

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    Old Nesebar

    by Stine620 Written Jul 16, 2012

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    This place is very beautiful, there is a place with beautiful buildings, history, opportunities for shopping both in stores and in the streets, eat dinner and lots of other things to do for both large and small.

    Remember camera!

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    The old fountain

    by timada Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Old fountain in Nessebar
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    Grecian or Turkish ?
    I was sure it was an old Turkish fountain ... I've search on internet some information about this fountain ( nothing about it ) and I discover it's Grecian ... it doesn't matter at all ... it's a nice , old fountain with cold , good water !

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    Church St John The Baptist

    by Childish Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Nessebar, Church St John The Baptist
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    Built in 11th century. It is a prototype of the churches in Nessebar erected afterwards.
    It has a crucified dome with three altar niches. The construction consists of two cylindrical vault arches that intersect in the middle.

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    Walking The New Town

    by johngayton Written Feb 16, 2010
    View Back Towards Old Town from Sea Garden
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    Whilst the old town is the pretty bit the new town is the functional but is still worth a visit with its lively cafes and restaurants and useful shops and other facilities. A pleasant wander is to follow the seafront through the Sea Garden and in the summer probably the beach. Even though most of the new town is just that - new! - the streets are well-maintained and the buildings include some attractive modern architecture.

    There is even a little historical digression in the form of a pair of sarcophogi in the Sea Garden but because there's no signage I haven't got a clue as to for whom they were constructed.

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    Ancient Nesebar

    by johngayton Written Feb 16, 2010
    Fortifications Around The Old Town Gateway
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    The old town has three millennia of diverse history and each individual period has left its own traces. The first thing you see when you arrive is the remains of the fortifications at the gateway. These date from the periods of Greek, Roman and Byzantine rule and were themselves built on Thracian foundations.

    Unfortunately the late 19th and early 20th century rebuilding of the town buried many of its ancient archaeological treasures but the sites for any modern building works must first be assessed with this in mind. One such is the dig overlooking Nesebar Bay which is currently being worked by archaeologists from the University of Sofia.

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    Old Town Churches

    by johngayton Written Feb 16, 2010
    Decorative Arches and Brickwork
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    It is reckoned that Nesebar had the highest number of churches per person in Bulgaria at the time of the 2nd Bulgarian Empire with over 40 in total.

    Many of these were built during the 10th to 14th centuries and feature ornate brickwork with decoratively-arched doorways and niches. During the Ottoman period most fell into disuse and the 1913, force 7, earthquake caused further damage.

    The surviving structures, in varying states of disrepair, have since been stabilised and are another of the architectural features of the old town with at least one on almost every street. These are usefully signposted (in several languages) with their approximate construction dates, names and pointing out the distinguishing features.

    For an excellent page on the individual churches try this one - viddra's.

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    Old Town Architecture

    by johngayton Written Feb 16, 2010
    Typical Old Town Street
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    At the time of Bulgaria's liberation from Ottoman rule in 1878 Nesebar was a relatively insignificant fishing village, inhabited mostly by Greeks. The town didn't revert back to Bulgarian rule immediately as it became annexed to the still Ottoman-controlled Eastern Rumelia until 1886.

    Following re-unification the town once again began to prosper and during this period of National Renaissance took on its present identity with the construction of the architecturally unique houses in what is known as the "Black Sea" style. This is characterised by the lower floor being walled with stone whilst the upper is timbered and with a slight overhang.

    Most of the buildings from the late 19th and early 20th century are still intact and have been sympathetically restored. Even the newer buildings have been constructed in a similar style.

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    At Michael's

    by Nikolay_Ivanov Updated Aug 24, 2009

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    At Michael's (Pri Maikala, in Bulgarian)- when you walk into the Old Town, on some of the narrow streets, you should see a sign "Pri Maikala". It's something like cave and mountain inside- they transformed everything so you have the feeling that you're entering into some wild place in the nature...There's a waterfall, a small bridge and little trees.
    There are turtles also- I watched them with pleasure because I have 2 like them at home.

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    Aquapark Nesebar.

    by cachaseiro Written Aug 18, 2009

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    Aquapark Nesebar.
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    There is an aquapark in the outskirts of Nesebar where i went twice.
    It´s a new place with very good facilities and it should keep children of all ages busy including 40 year old children like me who like water slides and pool bars :O).
    There is a free shuttle bus leaving from the city gate to old Nesebar every 20 minutes that takes you to the park and it takes you back for free aswell.
    The entrance depends on what time a day you arrive to the place and it is cheaper if you only stay there from mid afternoon till closing time.

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    Admire old Nessebar's houses

    by timada Updated Oct 22, 2008

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    Old houses in Nessebar
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    Some of the typical houses of Nessebar built in a unique style of the 16th-19th century are real architectural monuments ( the houses of Diamanti, that of Panayot Mouskoyani which hosts an ethnographic exhibition, the one of Captain Pavel). The old quarters of Nessebar shows remarkable taste and mastership in the construction of houses, stone walls, and streets.
    There are houses with stone-built ground levels and wooden upper floors jutting above the streets and external staircases. Nessebar houses have small yards facing the street. A wooden staircase leads up to the second floor which is lightly structured and completely faced with wood. The central living quarters are occupied by the parlor from which numerous doors lead to the remaining rooms. Wooden ceilings and whitewashed walls characterize the interior. The upper floor windows are wide, those on the ground floor are narrow and few in number.

    Adapted from www.marinapalace.bg

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    The Basilica

    by timada Written Oct 17, 2008

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    The Basilica , Nessebar
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    The Basilica in Nessebar is one of the impressive old buildings in Old Nessebar and originates back in the late 4th century AD. The building we see today was finished in the early 9th century AD.
    The basilica is 19 meters long, and out of a total width of 13 meters, the center nave is 9,3 meters wide which is an impressive span for a building of its time.
    The apsis is unusual in its construction - it is round on the inside, but is made up of 3 straight walls on the outside.
    Two rows of five pillars each separate the side naves from the middle nave.
    It is a testament to the power of the church that the basilica was actually part of the bishop's residence and not the town cathedral.
    Adapted from http://www.visitnessebar.info/

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    The Old Windmill

    by timada Updated Oct 16, 2008

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    Windmill in Nessebar
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    The Old Windmill on the passageway from New Nessebar to Old Nessebar is a lovely, intact Black Sea style windmill.
    A guide book mentions the windmill but contains no information about it. It's a fair guess that it's from the Bulgarian revival period from the 17th. to 19th. century
    The type of construction is a rather rough, basic style. No nice little details here, the design is meant to harness the sometimes fierce power of the wind at the Black Sea coast, and transfer the wind power down to the milling area inside the windmill.
    The main axis from the wings into the mill give you some idea what kind of force we are dealing with here. When the sails are strapped onto the wings, the load on the axis is considerable.
    The windmill base reveals a wooden guiderail and direct wood-to-wood contact. Considering the dryness of the area this is a bit surprising, as the friction between windmill and guiderail will create considerable heat whenever the mill is turned. Is this because metal was too expensive or impossible to get? Is the windmill rarely turned, because the wind direction is very stable? Some kind of lubricant was probably used when turning the mill, or it would be a very difficult job
    The side view of the windmill gives a good view of the three dimensional design used between axis and wings. The axis is prolonged out front and used to support the chains that go out to each wing in support, so they can better withstand the force of the wind. The design is somewhat similar to Greek windmills, which is probably not without reason, considering the history of the Bulgarian Black Sea coast with centuries of Greek presence.
    Adapted from http://www.visitnessebar.info/

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    Fortress Walls

    by timada Updated Oct 16, 2008

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    Fortress walls , Nessebar
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    You can see the remains of fortress walls (best preserved at the old town's gate and the port), authentic medieval, Roman and Greek street pavements, fortifications of different epochs and other buildings at the entrance of old Nessebar . When you enter in the town just on your right is The History Museum .

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    Relax Center Marieta Palace

    by timada Updated Oct 14, 2008

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    Terace of the Marieta Palace Hotel

    In every room of the Marieta Palace hotel there is a brochure about the Relax Center situated at the basement of the building . So much things to do here for you health and relaxation : massage ,reflex therapy , relaxing massage with honey , body remodeling ,solarium cosmetics ,face care , full regeneration from head to toe , body care .... thousand things to do !You can find here 7 therapist cabinets , jacuzzi , Turkish and steam bath , sauna , infrared sauna , tanning salon . All prices are in the brochure .

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Nesebar Things to Do

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