Yagodina Travel Guide

  • Trigrad village
    Trigrad village
    by SallyM
  • Worth it in the end
    Worth it in the end
    by SallyM
  • Gorge by Devils Throat
    Gorge by Devils Throat
    by SallyM

Yagodina Things to Do

  • SallyM's Profile Photo

    by SallyM Updated Feb 7, 2015

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    Yagodina's claim to fame is its cave system. As well as the actual caves, there is also a prehistoric cave dwelling, which dates to c. 4000 BC. The cave was home to master potters, who were able to produce smooth circular pots without the use of a wheel. Inside the cave you can see the location of fireplaces and kilns (there is also a reconstruction of a kiln), pottery from the site, millstones, loom-weights, spindles, animal and human bones and the tooth of a cave bear.

    Outside the caves are a few souvenir stalls selling mainly agate jewellery, and local jam and honey. There was also a small zip-wire to cross the river to the café (but don't worry, there is also a footbridge.)

    Reconstruction of fireplace Yagodina Cave Reconstruction Yagodina Cave Zipwire to the Cafe
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • SallyM's Profile Photo

    by SallyM Written Feb 7, 2015

    This walk started in Yagodina village. At first we walked through a meadow full of cows with very musical bells, then climbed up the mountain, noticing a buzzard as we walked.

    We had lunch in a meadow with lots of butterflies and red-winged grasshoppers. In the afternoon we walked down into a village of where we stopped for coffee, the shop that sold ice-creams being closed. Eventually we returned to Yagodina, entering the village at the opposite end to where we had started. The walk itself was quite pleasant apart from a couple of hairy parts during the afternoon, where there were rocky paths with a steep drop.

    View during Mt Durghada walk Our lunch stop
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • SallyM's Profile Photo

    by SallyM Written Feb 7, 2015

    Our day's walk was due to start in the Chairska gorge and end in the village of Trigrad, from where we would visit a famous local cave, known as the ‘Devil’s Throat’. We were taken to the starting point by minibus. The walk began in the bottom of the gorge, following a wide, level path that was a former Roman road. There were no scary precipices to worry about initially.

    After an hour or so, however, we found ourselves scrambling over rocks, and our guide looked around rather anxiously. There had been a rock fall, and the only way to reach our destination was to climb up a 20 foot slope to the path above. Somehow, I made it, mainly because our guide, who was stronger than she looked, hauled me up. The next section of the walk involved a steady climb, but as the path was wide and flanked by trees rather than a sheer drop, I was able to regain a little self-respect by overtaking some of the more experienced hikers in the group. We all felt that we had earned a rest when we stopped for our picnic lunch in a quiet meadow. Stopping on the way only to sample some sweet yellow tiny plums tasting like greengages, we made our way down to the village.

    The Devil’s Throat is the largest cave in the Balkans. It is allegedly where Orpheus emerged from the underworld (though it is not the only cave to claim this distinction). I was amused to note a stack of beer and coke crates just inside the entrance. The road to hell is paved with coca cola. It is said that anything which falls into the waterfall which enters the cave never emerges from the other side. In an experiment, even dye took two hours to come through, instead of the few minutes expected. For the intrepid, there are around 188 steps to climb up past the waterfall and out of the cave. I preferred to retreat back through the entrance and look for the elusive wallcreeper bird which is supposed to live in the vicinity. Sadly, it was indeed elusive. The only glimpse I caught of it was on a souvenir postcard.

    Whilst I waited for the others to emerge, I noticed a zip-wire across the gorge. I might have been tempted to have a go, but the bandaged arm of the operator did not inspire my confidence.

    Trigrad village An easy stroll... Worth it in the end Gorge by Devils Throat Devil's Throat this way....
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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Yagodina Local Customs

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    by SallyM Updated Feb 7, 2015

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    The Yagodina village festival takes place in early-mid-September, when the locals wear their traditional costume and sing and dance.

    Sadly, we missed the actual festival, as we returned home the day before. We were however fortunate to be allowed to watch the rehearsals, which took place in the village library.

    Our group reciprocated by teaching our hosts a traditional English song and dance - the hokey-cokey. (Sorry, Yagodina!)

    Village festival rehearsal, Yagodina Teaching an ahem traditional English dance
    Related to:
    • Festivals
    • Arts and Culture

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Yagodina What to Pack

  • SallyM's Profile Photo

    by SallyM Written Oct 12, 2009

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    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Walking boots, waterproof jacket, walking stick/hiking pole.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Bring everything you need - don't rely on being able to buy anything in Yagodina. And don't forget the sunscreen.

    Photo Equipment: Macro lens and tripod, if you want to photograph flowers and insects.

    Would have been better with a tripod!
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Backpacking
    • Hiking and Walking

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