City walls, Dubrovnik

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  • Old town and island of Lokrum seen from City Walls
    Old town and island of Lokrum seen from...
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  • City walls and Fort Bokar
    City walls and Fort Bokar
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  • Old town seen from the city walls
    Old town seen from the city walls
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  • ruki's Profile Photo

    CITY WALLS

    by ruki Updated Jan 22, 2006

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    The City Walls are among the finest and most complete in Europe. They protected the freedom of Dubrovnik Republic for centuries. They surround the entire Old City with their 1940 meters of length and up to 25 meters of height. The whole City Wall complex was built from the 8th until the 16th century, consisting of an inner and outer section. There are five bastions, 3 circular and 12 square and rectangular towers, two corner towers, and one huge fortress. The outer section of City Walls consists of a lower wall, having 10 semicircular bastions built by the famous Italian architect Michelozzo. The town is defended by two more separate fortresses, at Revelin on the eastern side and Lovrijenac on the southwest side. The moat ran around the outside section of the City Walls.

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    The walls of Dubrovnik

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Sep 4, 2006

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    Minceta Tower
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    No visitor to Dubrovnik can fail to be impressed by the walls that surround the oldest part of the city. Begun in the 13th century and made even more formidable in the 14th and 15th centuries as the threat from the Ottomans increased, they rise to a height of 25 metres and more, with numerous bastions and towers along their length. 6 metres on the landward side (the main threat to the city was considered to be from the Turks who would come from the east, the Ottoman Empire boundaries were only a couple of kilometres over the mountains ), 3 metres thick on the seaward side and over 2 kilometres long, they are considered by many to be the finest city walls anywhere in the world.

    The biggest tower is the Minceta Tower at the highest point of the city. The Bokar Tower was built in 1453 to protect the Pile Gate and the little port that lay in the bay below. Fortress Lovrijenac is not part of the walls but protects the western end of the city from its position on a high rocky crag. Two more fortress towers - St John and St Luke - protect the seaward corners and in between there are numerous squared forts and round bastions. The protection they offered the city was such that these walls were never breached - the terrible months of the bombardment of the city by Serbian forces and the damage that wrought seem very far away now and the restored walls seem as impregnable as they ever were once more.

    The high road to the south offers particularly good views though there are very few stopping places. Taking a boat ride also offers excellent closeup views of the walls and several of the towers and bastions.

    Click for panorama photo

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  • Balam's Profile Photo

    Walking The walls

    by Balam Updated Sep 17, 2012

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    Dubrovnik City Walls
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    The main thing to do and certainly the best is to walk around the majestic city walls, the views are fantastic.

    There are 3 points were you can access the city walls, Pile Gate (Vrata od Pila), The Dominican Monastery (Dominikanski Samostan) and near the Aquarium on Kneza Damjana Jude. you have to pay to walk around them though, this seems a bit of a con at first but it is something that is definitely worth doing even if it is the only thing you do while in Dubrovnik. Its not really that cheap at 70kn for adults and 30kn for children. (70kn is about 10 euro, When we arrived we entered the city via the Pile Gate and walked down the main street up to the Cathedral then over to the Dominican Monastery and onto the walls, We had to pay in Kuna as they do not accept Euros, we did not have that many but luckily we had enough!

    The views are fantastic, I loved the terracotta roofs the bell towers and the great walls and battlements. its not an easy walk especially when its 36c but the walls are really well looked after and there is the odd shop selling drinks and souvenirs as well as a few places to shelter.
    Building of the walls started in the 8th century and construction carried over the centuries with some extensive work carried out after the war in 1991.
    They are about 1 1/4 miles (just under 2 km) and are 82 ft (25m) at their highest point and 39ft (12m) at their widest point. it takes about an hour to walk round at a steady pace while taking photos.



    Open 08:00 - !900
    Adults 70kn, Children 30kn (They do not accept Euros)

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  • Gligoroff's Profile Photo

    Panorama & sightseeing excursion

    by Gligoroff Written Oct 19, 2005

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    Panorama
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    This tour begins with a coach drive to the coastal highway for a panoramic view of the city walls, ancient roof tops and the picturesque surroundings. Then you continue with the walking tour of the city which is one of the UNESCO-s List of Cultural Heritage. This ancient town, surrounded by ramparts and fortresses, is a treasure trove of architectural and cultural masterpieces, scrupulously preserved over the centuries. A pleasant walk will take you to the Rector?s Palace, the Francisian Monastery with its 14th century Pharmacy, as well as other places of interest.

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  • Krumlovgirl's Profile Photo

    Dubrovnik Walls

    by Krumlovgirl Updated Jan 7, 2005

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    castle as viewed from the walls

    The City Walls are usually the first thing on a tourist's list to do upon arriving to Dubrovnik-and with good reason. They're stunning.

    From Dubrovnik Online:
    The walls have protected the freedom of the Dubrovnik Republic for centuries. They surround the entire Old City with their 1940 meters of length and up to 25 meters of height. The whole City Wall complex was built from the 8th until the 16th century, consisting of an inner and outer section. There are five bastions, 3 circular and 12 square and rectangular towers, two corner towers, and one huge fortress. The outer section of City Walls consists of a lower wall, having 10 semicircular bastions built by the famous Italian architect Michelozzo. The town is defended by two more separate fortresses, at Revelin on the eastern side and Lovrijenac on the southwest side. The moat ran around the outside section of the City Walls.

    I've done the walls twice now, and they really are amazing. I reccommend taking something to drink when you do them. It willt ake you at least an hour.

    open: 9 am -6.30 pm, entrance fee: 15 kn, children 5 kn

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  • tpal's Profile Photo

    The Walls...A Perfect Introduction

    by tpal Written Jan 18, 2009

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    There is no doubt that the best way to gain an overview of Dubrovnik is to walk it's one and one-quarter mile Medieval wall. Built between the 10th and 13th centuries, with major modifications added in the 16th century, the walls continue to be worked on, though most of the work involves restoration and maintenance. A more recent embellishment is the statue of the City's patron saint, St. Blaise, over the Pile Gate. This sculpture is by the 20th century sculptor and Croatian national treasure, Ivan Meštrović.

    We noticed that during the day, often the hottest time of the day, the walls were crowded with slowly moving cruise and bus tour groups. We decided to wait until about 5:30 pm to avoid the rush, and were rewarded by not only a much more private and personal experience but also by the golden glow of the autumn sun setting over the Adriatic. The long shadows and soft light made for spectacular and dramatic views in every direction.

    The only downside was that toward the end of our circuit (we started near the Pile Gate and walked counter-clockwise), as we neared closing time of 7 p.m., the security staff started shooing us along as they swept the wall for stragglers. They were friendly but determined. We would have loved to have viewed the city and harbor from the walls at night.

    Intro Photo: With the Adriatic Sea aglow in the background, this is a view of the Sv. Stjepan Bastion with patron saint St. Blaise maintaining a constant vigil.

    Photo 2: As we began our walk the shadows over the rooftops lengthened and the Stradun fell completely in shadow. Even in the late afternoon, the main street is still a busy place.

    Photo 3: As the wall bends, following the course of the jagged coastline, you are rewarded by wonderful views of the exterior facade. This view is looking south from the Bokar XV Fortress.

    Photo 4: This view is looking back toward the Bokar XV Fortress. This bay appeared to be a popular launching point for kayakers. Take note of the flat roofed portico at the center of the photo on the water's edge; this is the Orhan Restaurant just outside the walls...a real treat that should not be missed.

    Photo 5: Here Carol, looking radiant, is standing on the wall just above the famous Buža 2 Cafe with a palm tree in full bloom on one side and Lokrum Island peaking out over her left shoulder...what a wonderful place!

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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Land side

    by solopes Updated Aug 2, 2012

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    Dubrovnik - Walls
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    The (mandatory) walk on the walls has two different sides: the ocean side and the land side. Most people cover only the ocean side, from where its possible to see the most beautiful points of the city.

    It's the easiest section with not much to go up and down. But I decided to follow it all, and am not sorry for it.

    The interior side is harder to walk, with some steep segments, but provide a different look, with some marvelous perspectives. And, fortunately (for me, of course!), it was the only way to see signs of the recent war.

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  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Walk along the city walls

    by karenincalifornia Written Jan 13, 2005

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    Dubrovnik city wall, Croatia

    For a small fee, you can walk all the way around the city walls that encircle the old town of Dubrovnik. For a small fee plus another small fee you can rent an audio tape and headphones. We walked along the wall, but opted to do it without headphones. The views are incredible, both of the sea and the city.

    Scattered here and there are stands that sell lemonades and sodas. You may need the refreshment. You can really work up a thirst during this walk, especially on a hot summer day.

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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Ocean Side

    by solopes Updated Dec 12, 2013

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    Dubrovnik
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    The (mandatory) walk on the walls of
    Dubrovnik has two different sides: the ocean side and the land side.

    Most people cover only the ocean side, from where its possible to see the most beautiful points of the city. It's the easiest section with not much to go up and down.

    To avoid the long lines, our guide made us enter in the southern entrance to the walls. It may have been a good idea (I don't know how were the things in the other entrance), but we made our way against the normal flow of people, and, in the narrow passages, we had some trouble.

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  • sieffron's Profile Photo

    Walk the City Walls

    by sieffron Written Nov 25, 2004

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    View of Stari Grad and Adriatic from walls

    The top activity of a Dubrovnik itinerary should be walking the walls that surround Stari Grad. These walls are 2000 meters of limestone, 25 meters tall at some points, with an average thickness of 1.5m, and they connect four round towers, two corner towers, three fortresses, 12 forts, five bastions, two land gates, and two port gates.
    The walls were constructed in the 13th century, when Dubrovnik (or Ragusa as it was then called) was a prominent Venetian trading port. Upon becoming independent from Venice, the walls were reinforced to protect the city state from Ottoman invasion.*

    *Source: Let's Go Eastern Europe 2004

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    On top of the city walls

    by JLBG Updated Nov 14, 2004

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    The round trip on the city walls is a must do for everybody. You should do it as early as possible in the morning in order to avoid the peak of heat and moreover the crowd. I feel that on a sunny winter morning, the sight should be even more magnificent !

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    Tiled roofs

    by JLBG Updated Nov 14, 2004

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    Most of the roofs have kept their ''Roman tiles'' (sometimes called ''half-boot''), very heavy and not very waterproof. But even those, which have been covered with modern mechanical tiles, keep a beautiful look because the color is the same.

    Very narrow streets allow protecting from the heat in summer, from the wind in winter.

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  • midnight_mike's Profile Photo

    Walking atop Dubrovnik's city walls

    by midnight_mike Written Jun 9, 2006

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    When not relaxing on the beach or island hopping, visitors to Dubrovnik should spend some time exploring the old city. Part of that exploration should include walking atop the city's walls. Bring suntan lotion, a good hat, a bottle of water, a camera with plenty of film and a good pair of walking shoes. There are no breaks in the wall, so you can walk around the entire city without interuption.

    The walk can be physically demanding, especially for those sensitive to heat or anyone with bad knees. There are several stair cases to climb and descend. Also, be warned that drinks sold during your walk atop the walls can be expensive. There is an admission fee.

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  • SORHUS's Profile Photo

    city walls

    by SORHUS Written Jun 5, 2006

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    this walk is a must do thing...we use about an hour
    we where told the walk took up to 4 hour but then i think u have to walk slowly
    we went in the evening since the heat wasnt to bad then and less people
    its open from 9 am to 7 pm and cost 50 kuna
    you can also pay to borrow a recorder that tell you the sights and story
    we started at the pile gate and to the steapest part first ...away from the sea
    the wiew is great so make sure you can take a lot of pictures with your camera
    dont forget to bring a bottle of water :-)

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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    The City Walls

    by acemj Updated Apr 10, 2004

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    I've heard that these walls are the best intact ancient walls in the world. When you arrive into the Old Town by way of the Pile Gate, the tickets to scale the wall can be purchased about a third of the way up the stairs on your left. As of February of 2004, it was 15kn to walk around the 2 kilometers of walls. In my opinion, that's a bargain for the spectacular views this affords. The only problem for me was that in the winter months, the walls close at 3 pm and as a result, I was unable to scale them during the best time of day for getting the perfect light for photos.

    If you start by heading toward the higher side of the walls, the first corner you come to will be the Minceta Fortress. As the highest point, the views over the Old Town are breathtaking from here. On the opposite end, you'll have to leave the walls and return to ground level as you walk around the Ploce Gate. You rejoin the walls by finding the St. John's Fortress. With a ticket, you can choose to return to the walls later as long as it is on the same day that the ticket was purchased.

    In the summer months, the walls are open from 9 am to 7:30 pm, but only from 10-3 in the winter.

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