Fun things to do in Dubrovnik

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Dubrovnik

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    Cable-Car

    by pugwashman Written Oct 18, 2013

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    The Cable Car runs from just outside the Old City Walls and goes up to a hill that overlooks the Old Town, Lokrum Island and across the rest of Dubrovnik, ie: Lapad Island etc.
    It's not cheap, about £11.00 (94kn) each for a return ticket, but as long as the weather is nice and the visibility is good, I definitely think it is worth it if you've got the time as the views are excellent.
    We also saw a lovely sunset, and there is meant to be a great restaurant up there although we didn't eat there. Aswell as the viewing platforms there is an old fort which you can walk past to get views down/up the coast.

    Dubrovnik Cable-Car with Lokrum Island Dubrovnik Old Town from viewpoint Cable Car & Lapad Peninsular Cable Car & Old Town Harbour
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    Sun (and little else) at Sunj Beach

    by gilabrand Updated Oct 5, 2013

    We took the Jadrolinija ferry to the island of Lopud that leaves from Dubrovnik harbor. The ferry makes stops at two other islands, Sipan and Kolocep. It was June and sizzling hot. It was a incredibly steep trek uphill in the boiling sun to get to Lopud's famous Sunj beach, which turned out to be nothing special. A little stretch of dirty sand surrounded by piles of garbage. The dune buggy that gets you up the hill at mid-point, when you realize you can't go another step, is a shameful rip-off, at 20 kuna a person each way. There is no shade. An umbrella and a chair cost us 60 kuna, but of course, you are there already so what choice do you have? My advice: Stick to the beach at the harbor, just a flat strip of asphalt and gravel, but the water is just the same.

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    Maritime Museum

    by Airpunk Written Aug 31, 2013

    Dubrovnik's wealth is built on sea trade, therefore it is no surprise to find a maritime museum. On two floors, you will get to see Dubrovnik's history from a maritime perspective. Indeed, this is the most complete and structured history of Dubrovnik you will get in any of the Dubrovnik museums. The museum has a good collection of maritime items, not only ship models and paitings, but also parts of the ships, charts, flags and many more. Though maritime museums are usually not among the first I visit in a city, I liked this one very much.
     
    The ticket for  the Maritime Museum (70 kuna, 2013) enables you to visit the Rector's Palace, Revelin Fort, the Ethnographic museum and the Maritime Museum. You can buy the ticket comprising these four places at any other of them as well. The ticket is valid for 7 days after the visit of the first museum, but you can visit each museum only once.

    Maritime Museum, Dubrovnik Exhibits in the maritime museum, Dubrovnik St. Bliase in te maritime museum
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    Orthodox Church (Church of the Annunciation)

    by Airpunk Written Aug 28, 2013

    The Serbian Orthodox Church is comparatively young in Dubrovnik's old town - dating only from 1877.  The Church of the Holy Annunciation serves the Serbian Orthodox community and suffered from the attacks during the Balkan Wars. The church possesses a large collection of icons and books, some of the icons can be seen in the church itself. Some more, together with several other religious items, are located in the annexed Museum of the Serbian Orthodox Church. Unfortunately, I can't say anything about this museum as it was one of very few I did not visit in Dubrovnik.

    Serbian Orthodox Church, Dubrovnik Ceiling of the Serbian Orthodox Church Serbian Orthodox Church, Dubrovnik Serbian Orthodox Church, Dubrovnik
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    St. Jakob's beach

    by Airpunk Written Aug 25, 2013

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    If you are looking for an alternative to Banje or the beaches at Lapad, I would recommend St. Jakob's. This beach is located a 30 min. walk away from the old town and has a mix of pebbles and sand. Be aware that the last couple of metres to the beach involve some sets of steps. The beach is not as full as Banje. However, it can be that a cruise ship unloads some hundred of its passengers on it for some hours. The beach is therefore best avoided if there is a cruise ship visible next to Lokrum island. Other than that, I would prfere it over Banje and some of the Lapad beaches.
     
    To get to the beach, leave the old town through Ploce gate and follow the street along the coast, past Banje Beach. Even if you see a larger road to the left and a residential area to the right, walk along the street with the private buildings. At the end, you will see a parking lot with a church. The path and the steps leading to the beach are right behind the church.

    St. Jakob's Beach St. Jakob's Beach from above St. Jakob's Beach from above St. Jakob's Beach View from St. Jakob's Beach
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    Banje Beach

    by Airpunk Written Aug 25, 2013

    This beach is the closest to the old town and can become pretty full in the high season. It is not the most beautiful beach, but more than just OK. One part of the beach can be used for free, the right one (if you look onto the sea) is owned by the eastwest club where you have to buy drinks and have to pay 10EUR/bed if you want to rent one. The club didn't really look like it was something I would enjoy (too posh for my taste). The public part of the beach is OK, but I would rather recommend beaches at Lapad or St. Jakob's beach, if you are not in hurry.

    Banje Beach Public part left, eastwest club right
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    Rupe Ethnographic Museum

    by Airpunk Written Aug 25, 2013

    The ethnographic museum shows traditional costumes and items related to rural life along the region. Though there are very few explanations and it is not too exciting, it is nice to walk around and have a look at those old items. I especially liked the reconstructed living room with many details, including 19th century tiles. The ground floor has temporary exhibitions, the one I saw was about bikes and their owners in Copenhagen. The museum is located in a former granary building (called Rupe, hence its name).
     
    I would recommend the museum only, if you have bought the entry card at Revelin Fort, Rector's Palace or the Maritime Museum before. That card costs 70 kuna but allows you to enter the other palces for free. Paying 70 kuna for the Ethnographic Museum alone is a little too much for my taste.

    Costumes at Rupe Ethnographic Museum Basement of Rupe Ethnographic Museum Fresco from the time when it was a granary One of the reconstructed kitchens More traditional costumes
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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Collegium Ragusinum and little chapel

    by Airpunk Written Aug 20, 2013

    The jesuit college looks a little run down but is part of the Baroque complex at Boskovic Square. It was founded under the name Collegium Ragusinum in 1658 and was used until the mid-1990s. Now it houses the old library of the university and a high school.

    Right behind the former college, there is a small church or chapel. It seems that it became victim to the 1667 earthquake and has been closed afterwards. The chapel is located at Ul. Od Margarite. Unfortunately, I never found out more about this chapel.

    The place next to the chapel is popular with kids playing football. Don't worry crossing the “pitch” but be aware that you may be hit by a ball when walking along this street.

    Gatehouse of Collegium Ragusinum Main building of Collegium Ragusinum Little chapel The chapel seen from the city walls
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    Marin Drzic Statue

    by Airpunk Written Aug 15, 2013

    A great playwright often named the "Croatian Shakespeare", Marin Drzic is one of Dubrovnik's most famous historical figures. It is not known how Marin Drzic looked like, there are several pictures claiming to depict him - none of them has been proven to be the most authentic one. On many of them, he appears with a big nose as does his bronze statue. Tourists like to rub his nose which has become therefore pretty shiny. Unfortunately, I do not know whether the rubbing of the nose brings eloquence, intelligence or just good luck. Some other prefer to rub his knees. Marin Drzic's statue is located close to the Town Hall (which is also used as a theatre). A nearby, very recommendable restaurant is named after his most famous play "Dundo Maroje".

    Marin Drzic Me rubbing Marin Drzic's nose

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    Boskovic Square and Spanish steps

    by Airpunk Written Aug 13, 2013

    Boskovic Square was reshaped after the great earthquake of 1667. You will most probably approach Boskovic Square through a set of Baroque steps, modelled after the Spanish steps in Rome. Though not official, they are known as the Spanish steps in Dubrovnik as well. Dubrovnik's version was completed in 1738, just a decade after the one in Rome. Note the beautiful, though faded "Collegium Rhagusinum" inscription on top of the steps.
    The square is famous for its baroque buildings, especially the Jesuit College (Collegium Ragusinum) and the Jesuit Church. Both of them are described in separate tips.

    Spanish Steps Boskovic Square
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    Gundulic Square

    by Airpunk Written Aug 13, 2013

    This little square behind the Cathedral and St. Blaise church is known for its market and its restaurants/cafés. It also has one of two mini-markets in the old town. Though the market (morning and early afternoon only) has mostly tourist-focused stalls, this is the place to try fresh fruits and some specialities from the reigion.
    The guy in the middle is Ivan Gundulic, a 17th century poet who is buried in the Franciscan church. He is also shown on the 50 kuna bill. The little fountain is located next to the Konzum supermarket.

    Gundulic Square Gundulic statue Gundulic Square seen from Boskovic Square Little fountain at Gundulic Square

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    Jewish Museum and Synagogue

    by Airpunk Written Aug 13, 2013

    Around 50 items, representative of Dubrovnik's Jewish History, are located in two rooms, ranging from the Middle Ages to present time, including also the chapter when Dubrovnik was under German control. There is little to none explanation on the exhibits.
    The original synagogue dates back to 1352 which means that it is the second oldest in Europe after Prague and the oldest Sephardic Synagogue. When Spain expulsed their Jewish community from 1492 on, many Jews found a new home here which led to a sizeable Jewish population. They mostly lived in the streets around the synagogue. Unfortunately, most of the Jewish population was killed or fled during the Holocaust. The synagogue survived and all the valuable items were hidden and smuggled out of town. After the war, only few Jews returned, though the synagogue was rededicated in 1956. Today, the synagogue is mostly a museum as there are not enough members to have regular congregations. The building itself is work a look as well. With all the marvellous architecture in this city, this old Gothic house in a side street remains often unnoticed.

    Entry fee was 25 KN (2013) which is OK for the size of the museum – but remember that you get the historical synagogue as a bonus. Recommended if you are already familiar with Jewish life, otherwise the exhibits might not be easy to appreciate. A Judaica shop is located next door, don't know of they might have more explanations on the items.

    Jewish Museum, Dubrovnik Exhibition in the Jewish Museum Nazi documents in Croatian language Judaica Gift shop
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    Memorial Room of the Defenders of Dubrovnik

    by Airpunk Written Aug 11, 2013

    This room is located in the Sponza palace (see separate tip) and can be visited for free (June 2013). For that, enter the palace and turn left immediately.

    The memorial room has photos of Dubrovnik as well as of all victims who died during the siege of Dubrovnik in 1991 and 1992. Beside that, it has photos of Dubrovnik during the war years, maps, uniforms and several other items related to the siege. Explanations in English are available and gives you a good introduction to this sad chapter of Dubrovnik's history. A 15 min. documentation film is shown here as well. Good (though small) alternative to the museums which have war photos only.

    Memorial Room of the Defenders of Dubrovnik War photos on the ceiling Flag of the Republic of Ragusa and War photography
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    Bell Tower, Luza and Luza Square

    by Airpunk Written Aug 11, 2013

    Luza Square has a hand full of interesting sights, including the Sponza Palace, Church of St. Blaise and Orlando's Column. You''ll find some smaller events going on here from time to time as well.
    On the eastern side, there are two buildings, one looking like a gatehouse and a bell tower. The gate house is called Luza, and has a set of bells which are rang on special occasions. It was finished in 1463 and restored in 1952.
    The neighbouring bell tower is slightly older, dating from 1424. However, it has been damaged by the 1667 earthquake and after it began to lean, it was decided to pull it down and rebuild in 1929. The bell in the tower is struck every half and every full hour by two bronze soldiers named Maro and Baro. These two figures are very popular and several stories have been written about them. The original soldiers were replaced in the 1929 restoration as well. The originals can be seen in the nearby Rector's Palace.

    Belltower, Luza and Luza square The belltower Belltower, seen from city walls Belltower and one of the bronze jacks Belltower, Luza and Luza Square
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    Dubrovnik Cathedral

    by Airpunk Written Aug 11, 2013

    Built on the site of several predecessor buildings, the present one date from 1669 when the construction of a new Cathedral started. The old building was severely damaged during the earthquake of 1667, but parts of it were integrated in the new construction. Baroque is the predominant style in the building. A Titian painting adorns the main altar. The crypt is especially interesting for archaeologists as it has still many remains of all predecessor buildings dating back to the 6th century. Unfortunately this also means that it is not accessible to the public. The Cathedral claims to have several relics, including some of St. Blaise. For those interested: These can only be see with a prior appointment.
    Though St. Blaise is venerated in this city, the Cathedral's full name is Cathedral of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary.

    The Cathedral is not as large or as pompous as you might expect, mostly due to lack of funds after the earthquake and space limitations within Dubrovnik's old town. Still, it is a splendind cathedral and part of any old town visit.

    Dubrovnik Cathedral at night The Dome of Dubrovnik Cahedral Dubrovnik Cathedral Inside Dubrovnik Cathedral Barqoue ornaments at the organ
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