Rector's Palace, Dubrovnik

4 out of 5 stars 4 Stars - 27 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • The famous hands
    The famous hands
    by Airpunk
  • Rector's Palace, Dubrovnik
    Rector's Palace, Dubrovnik
    by Airpunk
  • One of us three doesn't make noise at night
    One of us three doesn't make noise at...
    by Airpunk
  • peterdhduncan's Profile Photo

    The Rector's Palace

    by peterdhduncan Updated Nov 13, 2013
    2 more images

    The Rector's Palace, which was the seat of government and the residence of the rector when Dubrovnik was a republic now contains the Cultural Historical Museum.

    Was this review helpful?

  • jlanza29's Profile Photo

    Small and interesting

    by jlanza29 Written Nov 6, 2013
    the rector's private bedroom
    2 more images

    The Rector's palace was the seat of the government and residence of the Prince (Rector) of the Dubrovnik Republic. The history of Dubrovnik as an independent city state situated on the east coast of the Adriatic lasted until 31st January 1808 when a decree issued by the Napoleon's army dissolved the centuries-old Dubrovnik Republic. As the head of the executive branch of government (Small Council - Consilium Minus), the Rector of the Dubrovnik Republic was elected for a one-month period of office. The foreign affairs were managed by the Senate (the Council of the Rogatory - Consilium Rogatorum), while the legislature was the responsibility of the Parliament that comprised all members of the Dubrovnik nobility from the age of 18 (Great Council - Consilium Maius).

    entrance was 35 kuna and we spent about 30 minutes and saw everything ….

    Was this review helpful?

  • xaver's Profile Photo

    Rector palace

    by xaver Written Oct 31, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    square

    It used to be the house of the Rector and his offices.
    It was restored the first time after an explosin in 1463 and then a second time after the earthquake of 1667. As soon as you enter you find yourself in a beautiful outer gallery adorned with renaissance capitals. Opposite of the entrance there is the prison and on the left the administrative offices.
    Rector's apartments are on the first floor.
    Price is 40 KN

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Rector's Palace

    by Airpunk Written Aug 20, 2013
    Rector's Palace, Dubrovnik
    4 more images

    This beautiful palace was the seat of the government of the Republic of Ragusa. Built in 1272, it survived fires and earthquakes though the respective reconstruction have led to a mix of style from Romanesque to Baroque.
     
    The rector, the head of state of the Republic, had his offices here. In an unusual system, the rector was elected every month from members of the noble families. The Ragusans followed the philosophy that power corrupts and that therefore no one should have the power for a longer period. The rector also had to spend the full month in the palace.
     
    Architectural details are found here en masse, including the fists holding the handrails of the large steps. Note also the dark alley to the left which is also used as exhibition space - and dates from the early beginnings of this building. The historical museum is located in here since 1872. Exhibitions are mixed, including silverware, paintings, several items from the Ragusan government and war photography from the 1990s. The original bronze jacks from the bell tower called Maro and Baro can be found here as well.
     
    The ticket for the Rector's Palace (70 kuna, 2013) enables you to visit the Revelin Fort, the Ethnographic museum and the Maritime Museum. You can buy the ticket comprising these four places at any other of them as well. The ticket is valid for 7 days after the visit of the first museum, but you can visit each museum only once. Photography is only allowed in some of the exhibitions, please always check with the staff. Plan around 1 1/2 hours for a visit here as though there are many exhibitions - the single exhibitions are not too large.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    The Rector's Palace

    by antistar Updated May 28, 2013
    The Rector's Palace, Dubrovnik
    1 more image

    Perhaps the most noble building in Dubrovnik's old town is suitably the former seat of the head of the Republic. The Rector didn't rule over Ragusa, but was the appointed figurehead. He was interred within the building for just a single month after his election.

    Entering the building through the elegantly colonnaded facade, you will find yourself in the palace museum. Here you can wander the offices and quarters of the Rector, and imagine the sumptuousness of life as a Ragusa noble.

    Was this review helpful?

  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Leading Building

    by solopes Updated Dec 6, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dubrovnik - Croatia

    The Palace of the Dubrovnik's Republic rector it's an interesting building from the 17th century (reconstruction) mixing gothic and Renaissance styles.

    The best (long) descryption of it may be found in Dubrovnikcity

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    Rector's Palace

    by spidermiss Updated Jun 14, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rector's Palace, Dubrovnik, Croatia
    4 more images

    The Rector's Palace in situated in the Old Town between the Church of St. Blaise and the Cathedral. This is the home of the Cultural History Museum. The Palace is designed in a Gothic and Renaissance style with Baroque features. This Palace has reigned since the 14th century although the building stood at the same site since the 13th Century.

    Following a fire in 1435 the palace was rebuilt by Onofrio di Giordano della Cava (from Naples) who was comissioned to build the city's water supply system at the time. The palace was damaged by a gunpowder explore 28 years later since the fire and the palace was reshaped and renewed in Renaissance style.

    The palace faced further setbacks in 1520 and 1667 and caused extensive damage to the palace. Again the palace was redesigned but in Baroque style and a new flight of stairs was added into the palace's atrium replacing the damaged ones before. Many other features including a clock, a bell, monuments and rocco elements were added.

    Following another earthquake in the 18th Century, the eastern front of the palace facing the harbour underwent some extension restoration. This explains why the Palace has a variety of architectural styles to the building. Today, Rector's Palace still survives and belongs to the museum of Dubrovnik. You can able to see the styled rooms with its interior furnishing which goes back centuries whilst touring the palace.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • Gili_S's Profile Photo

    Rector's Palace

    by Gili_S Written Mar 6, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    This is the Rector's Palace, a unique site which is very interesting from the history and architecture point of view, it is located just on the Stradum and it was re constructed many times as it was damage by earthquake, fires, wars and other occasions through its history.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • aukahkay's Profile Photo

    The Rector's Palace

    by aukahkay Written Sep 27, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rector's Palace
    2 more images

    The Rector's Palace is a harmonious Gothic and Renaissance palace with certain Baroque additions. The palace owes its present shape to many additions and reconstructions throughout its turbulent history. From time to time it happened that the palace was destroyed or heavily damaged by either fires, gunpowder explosions or earthquakes which required a total or partial reconstruction or repair of the building.

    Today the Rector's palace is the home to the history department to museum of Dubrovnik. The majority of the halls have styled furniture so as to recreate the original atmosphere of these rooms. In addition to style furniture numerous portraits and coats of arms of the noble families, paintings of old masters, coins minted by the Republic, the original keys of the city gates, and the number of important state documents are on permanent exhibit in the palace.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Rector Museum is a Nice site

    by BruceDunning Updated May 25, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Display of weaponry
    4 more images

    The museum is very nice and has a great variety on display. I guess it is the ethnographic museum and cost is 30 kuna-$6. It would take about two hours to give the museum full justice, but you could study much more. It could get crowded when tours are coming at the same time. Key areas inside the building are the prison and many pictures of the town after the Bosnia war period 1990's, coins and medias, an elaborate courtroom from the 18th century, chapel, music room and especially interesting is the Rector study. That has a 17th century cabinet that is extremely ornate and hidden compartments for documents, in addition to having painted scenes on glass and ebony

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Rector-Fabulous Palace and Museum

    by BruceDunning Updated May 25, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Front of the two story Gothic style
    2 more images

    It apparently began as a defense building to house armaments and military around 1272, and shortly after it was converted into a palace, so by 1349, it was the main palace of the town for the Rector. A fire destroyed the whole building in 1435 and two end towers were raised then. The contractor was Onofrio Giordino who also constructed the fountain. again in 1463, an explosion from gunpowder damaged the building, and the arches were reconfigured then. Next came the earthquake that afterword made other minor changes to the structure, and designing as Baroque besides Gothic look. The courtyard is wonderful and the staircases lead to second floor in two areas. It is all a museum inside-See next page.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    The Rector's Palace

    by Tom_Fields Written Feb 11, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Rector's Palace
    1 more image

    This was the seat of power in the old city-state of Dubrovnik. For centuries, the Rector governed the city, and was expected to be here at all times, except for official business, during his time in office. The city council elected Rectors to serve a one-month term of office, so there was regular turnover.

    Neopolitan architect Onofrio di Giordano de la Cava designed this palace in the 15th century; since then, it's been modified a few times. The largest changes occurred after the 1667 earthquake, making the style more Baroque. All in all, it's an elegant building, but fairly modest considering Dubrovnik's huge wealth.

    Today, it's an art, crafts, and history museum, with works by Italian and Croatian masters. This should be on every visitor's itinerary.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • tpk2's Profile Photo

    Rector’s Palace

    by tpk2 Written May 27, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The city-state of Ragusa was ruled by a Knez, Rector. Rector was appointed for one month and was not allowed to leave the palace except for state affairs.

    The building houses the town museum with art and historical exhibits. The ticket is 25 kunas (2007) or 50 kunas for a combined ticket to the Rector’s palace, ethnographic and maritime museums and Marin Drzic’s house.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • nsbm's Profile Photo

    Rectors Palace

    by nsbm Updated Nov 14, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Rectors facade
    4 more images

    Thought to exist since the late 1200s and documented by various names, this site houses the palace of the former Major Council of the medieval republic. Its present Renaissance-Gothic form was constructed in1435. This present reconstruction occurred after the original edifice was gutted by fire. It was none other than Onofrio who was responsible for this structure, yet another of dubrovniks engineering masterpieces. While here look up at the top of the capitals to see the interesting reliefs. Today it houses the History department of the Museum of Dubrovnik.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Rector of Dubrovnik

    by sandysmith Updated Nov 12, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rector's Palace Museum
    3 more images

    The museum of the Rector's Place houses artwork and furniture, giving insight to how the Rector lived here on their official duties. The Rectors of Dubrovnik governed for a period of one month only before a new one was elected and during this time he lived, alone, without his family. He could leave the palace only when engaged upon some state business; otherwise he was not allowed to leave it. The Place has an internal courtyard and off this are the interesting little prisions too - have a look for the carving of the dragon on the right hand side of the entrance.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Dubrovnik

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

85 travelers online now

Comments

View all Dubrovnik hotels