Diocletian's Palace, Split

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  • Dioklecijanova palaca
    Dioklecijanova palaca
    by croisbeauty
  • Diocletian's Palace
    by croisbeauty
  • Diocletian's Palace
    by croisbeauty
  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Diocletian's Palace

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 13, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dioklecijanova palaca
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    Favorite thing: Today, the well preserved Roman architecture is interlaced with several layers from later ages. The old core of the town, so-called Varos, is situated inside the walls of the palace which was of huge proportions and built in the shape of an fortress.

    Fondest memory: Do not miss to visit the underground part of the Diocletian's Palace, so-called catacombas, with network of corridors where nowadays a number of galleries, souvenir shops and museum is situated.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Diocletian's Palace

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 13, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dioklecijanova palaca
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: Seventeen hundred years ago, Split was marked on the map of the Roman Empire when the Emperor Diocletian chose to have his residential palace erected there. The palace erected inside natural bay of Adriatic, which is also protected by the line of islands in front of it.

    Fondest memory: See closer look to the remains of the palace, it represents nucleus around which the town of Split has raised up.

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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    Diocletian's Palace and Old Town

    by acemj Updated Mar 13, 2004

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    Favorite thing: Though Split is Croatia's second largest city next to Zagreb, it's not very difficult to navigate as a traveler. Most of the most interesting sights are located within a relatively small area loosely confined to the Old Town and the Diocletian's Palace and I found that walking was by far the best way to see the sights.

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    Diocletian's Palace

    by codrutz Updated Feb 18, 2004

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    Favorite thing:
    The roman emperor Diocletian built his palace in the bay of Aspalathos, at the end of the 3rd century a.d. The bay is located on the south side of a short peninsula running out from the Dalmatian coast into the Adriatic Sea, 4 miles from the former capital of the roman province of Dalmatia - Salona.
    The palace is today the heart of the city Split, and it is one of the most famous and integral architectural and cultural construct on the croatian Adriatic coast.

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    DIOCLETIAN'S PALACE ...

    by pegi1 Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Favorite thing: DIOCLETIAN'S PALACE

    Diocletian's Palace is among the best preserved monuments of the Roman building heritage in the world. Owing to the research done during 20th century by an Austrian G. Niemann and by a French E. Herbrard, based on the previous research done by an Englishman R. Adam in 18th century, the original layout of the Palace has been disclosed. More systematic research and study of the Palace have been conducted since 1950s.

    The imperial palace has been constructed as an appropriate interpolation of various contents of a luxurious villa - the Emperor's summer residence into the scheme of a Roman military camp (castrum), divided into four quarters by two main streets. There were Emperor's quarters situated in the southern section of the Palace, and it was the place where all official and religious ceremonies took place, while, on the other hand, the lodgings of the servants, Emperor's guard and soldiers were situated in the northern section, where the warehouses and the workshops were also located.

    The Palace is a rectangular building (some 215m by 180 m) , with four big towers at its corners, with four gates on each side and four small towers on its walls. There are no openings on the lower parts of the walls, while, on the upper parts there is a monumental porch on the south side, and there are arcades on the other three sides.

    During the following centuries, the residents of the Palace and the citizens of the city have adapted this space for their needs, and so both the buildings within the Palace and the external walls with towers have greatly changed their original appearance.

    The extensions added along the eastern and the northern wall of the Palace during the following centuries, were demolished after the World War 2, so the original appearance of the Palace was revealed.

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