Diocletian's Palace, Split

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  • Diocletian's Palace
    by DavidBotts
  • Diocletian's Palace
    by shavy
  • Diocletian's Palace
    by croisbeauty
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    An Interesting Place

    by DavidBotts Written Jul 8, 2015

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    The Palace was built on two levels, a lower level which was built at or below sea level and a higher level where the Emperor and his guards lived. Diocletian was the last of the emperors who really went after Christians, including his converted wife and daughter, whom he had executing in the palace. The palace is quite large, with most of its walls intact, although somewhat remodeled. After the fall of the empire squatters moved in and began to quarry the place for their homes. There is quite a mix of do it yourself buildings in the palace that never saw a building permit. The same squatters used to make holes in the floors of there homes to access the lower level of the palace which became the world's largest cesspool. The lower level has since been cleaned up and is now where you start your tour of the palace and find a maze of tourist shops. The place is well worth a visit and there is plenty of shopping and restaurants around the area.

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    Inside Diocletian’s Palace

    by shavy Written Aug 26, 2014

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    Split known for their Diocletian's Palace. At the end of the 3rd century this Roman emperor decided to build the Bay of Aspalathos. huge palace. He spent the last years of his life. In the seventh century, the inhabitants of Salona, who were fleeing the marauding Avars, settled in this town. The palace is still the heart of the city.

    The palace was not completely gone, we've seen some of the column still stands and intact. This place is one of the most important sight in Split. Here, where everyone's just sit and relax watch other traveler
    Diocletian Palace stands along with the old city center on the World Heritage List of UNESCO. And one of the best preserved palaces of the Roman imperial period

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    Grad

    by solopes Updated Jan 5, 2014

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    The upper side of the palace is... a fabulous mess.

    A whole town has grown inside it, with some original remains, as the peristyle and Jupiter's temple, side by side with posterior constructions, some classified, as the cathedral built upon Diocletian's mausoleum.

    To complete the scene, the town lives, in bars, shops and crowds wandering all around.

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    The subterranean

    by solopes Updated Dec 12, 2013

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    Very well preserved the subterranean helps to have an approximated idea of the palace's concept.

    It evidences the huge size of the original buildings, and shows the techniques of construction, though it's hard to understand the use of most of the rooms.

    A reasonably large craft commerce is installed in its entrance.

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    Diocletian's Palace

    by antistar Updated May 30, 2013

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    The most famous site in the city is Diocletian's Palace. Emperor Diocletian was famous for his cruelty to Christians, and was responsible for Rome's most brutal and bloody purges. There's probably no little irony then that the Christians went and built a great Cathedral on the ruins of his palace.

    Since its abandonment by the Romans it has transformed over the years to form an almost symbiotic partnership with the city and its inhabitants. Markets run in its basement, restaurants serve out of its walls, and shops sell goods in its shadow. It's hard to tell one from the other, and it's quite likely that the ruins of the Roman palace became the stones that built the Venetian homes that came later.

    As well as being famous for housing a brutal Roman emperor, the palace has another claim to fame: It inspired the Neoclassical architectural movement. Take a look at the palace portico. You'll see that portico design fronting buildings across the UK, USA and USSR where neoclassical buildings were popular.

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    Diocletican Palace

    by traveloturc Updated Mar 24, 2012

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    It was build around 298. AC when the Roman imperator Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus decided to start the construction of the grand villa in the bay of Split on the Dalmatian coast nearby (5 kilometres) his birth place - Salona.... His reign was remembered by great reforms. The most important one was, the system of the rule of four (two Caesars and two Augusts). Diocletian was the first emperor in history to abdicate willingly, but also he was a big Christian persecutor.
    Diocletian was declared to be divinity by the Roman senate while he was still very much alive. As a Jupiter's son he retreated himself to his fortified residence in Split where he treats his rheumatics at sulphurs and thermal springs.
    The palace occupies an area of about 30 000 square meters. It is rectangular and was originally fortified by 16 towers. At the same time it was residence of an emperor (villa rustica) and Roman fortification (castrum) with army troops.
    After Diocletian's death the palace remained under the Roman imperial jurisdiction until 480.

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    Carrarina poljana

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 26, 2011

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    Carrarina poljana, which occupaing northern part of the former Diocletianus Palace, was never planned to be a square. In fact, the only open space inside the palace planned to be a square was the imperial Peristyle. When passing throughout the Golden Gate you will find yourself at an open air space which is very pitoresque but in some way look alike unfinished. This empty space was created in the beginning of the 19th century when Napoleon conquest Dalmatia and his army crashed down pre-excisting medieval houses. That is why you can't see around any fancy facade of the buildings which usually overlooking carefully planned squares.
    Nowadys this square has usual Split's "crazy" alike life style during a year but in the summer it is part of the Split Festival, using for performing plays called folk theater.

    Carrarina poljana

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    Grisogono - Cipci Palace

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 26, 2011

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    Grisogono - Cipci Palace is one of the most interesting building in whole of Split. It is fine example of incorporeting a new built building in already excisting ancient structure of the Diocletianus palace. This palace is unique and real mixture of a very different architectural styles from different ages. Here you could see late-Antique style - Romanesque - late-Gothic - Renaissance - Baroque, all in one and yet so harmonious.
    The palace belonging to the noble Grisogono family, the oldest living family in Dalmatia. In the 14th century the northern part of the palace was acquired by another noble family Cipci (or Cipiko), who restored it in a Gothic style.
    It seems that even great builder Jurij Dalmatinac took his part in redesigning this palace, although there excist no written records about it. Another rumour says that the upper floor of the palace was designed by another great builder, Nikola Firentinac.
    The ground floor of the palace is occupied by the cafe-bar Luxor and you shouldn't miss to entrance inside of it. There on its floor you can see the remains of an ancient temple.

    Grisogono - Cipci Palace

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    Cipriano de Ciprianis

    by croisbeauty Updated Aug 23, 2011

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    To my money Cipriano de Ciprianis is the most beautiful palace in whole of Split. This a very simple late-Romanesque styled building from 1394 used to be home of noble family originally from island of Korcula. There is beautiful statue to St. Anthony standing on the corner of the palace, but the building is unique for its six parts windows (heksaforas) which decarating its first floor from the both sides.
    The palace stands on the corner of Narodin Trg, right next to the Western Gates.

    Cipriano de Ciprianis Palace

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    Defending towers and walls

    by croisbeauty Updated Aug 17, 2011

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    The story of the people and the walls last so long, since the very beginning. Most of the historians agree that the civilisation has begun when humans started to built the walls. But let's be ironical did they built the walls for protection of the invasion or it was built to obstruct colonisation of those who aren't welcomed?
    Let us see how we stand regarding the city or state walls today? Yeah, nowadays we dont built the walls anymore, but what is visa system if not the walls?

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    Vestibul

    by croisbeauty Updated Aug 17, 2011

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    Vestibul is originally latin word for the entrance, in fact it was entrance hall to the Diocletianus rooms. It used to serve as a foyer in which guests and visitors waited to meet the Emperor. At its time vestibul was richly adorned in a such a way to impress the visitors. Imagine it, as is now, but completely panelled by the marble and adorned by numerous sculptures.
    Vestibul was located in the central part of the Diocletianus Palace, right behind the Peristyle. It is spacious round room and no roof on its top.

    Vestibul

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    Diocletian's Palace

    by spidermiss Updated Jun 12, 2011

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    The Roman Emperor Diocletian built his palace in preparation for his retirment in May 305 AD by the bay area of Split. The rectangular palace complex consisted of a villa, a military camp, gates and towers and is encircled by fortification walls. The cathedral's belfy was added in the 12th Century.

    Today you can wander through the palace and its enclosed mazes and space. In the complex there is a tourist information office and also are markets, shops, cafes and restaurants.

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    Temple of Jupiter

    by antistar Updated Apr 6, 2011

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    Back in Roman times this temple to Rome's greatest god would have been much grander, with a decorated portico supported by doric columns, and a set of sharp-cornered, stone stairs flanked by ornate statues. Now it's a small, crumbling church shaded by a pinched stone corridor leading from the Peristylium, the main square of the palace and cathedral. A little of the original survives, including partial remains of two lion statues brought from Egypt by Emperor Diocletian himself.

    Temple of Jupiter, Split

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    Diocletian Palace

    by aukahkay Written Sep 30, 2010

    Diocletian's Palace is a building in Split that was built by the Roman emperor Diocletian at the turn of the fourth century AD. Diocletian built the massive palace in preparation for his retirement in 305 AD. It lies in a bay on the south side of a short peninsula running out from the Dalmatian coast, four miles from Salona, the capital of the Roman province of Dalmatia. In November 1979 UNESCO, in line with the international convention on cultural and natural heritage, adopted a proposal that the historic city of Split built around the Palace should be included in the register of World Cultural Heritage.

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    Diocletian Palace-Some Remnants Intact

    by BruceDunning Updated May 27, 2010

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    Building started by Diocletian in 295, and by 305AD, the palace was completed, so the Roman Emperor could have a retirement palace. They got white limestone from Brac, and marble from Italy, as well as sphinxes and columns from Egypt. It had 1 million square feet inside, and the walls 570 & 700 feet in length and most is 50-70 feet high, with 2-3 stories that once were high end living units/homes for the gentry ringing the outside south walls. Surrounding the walls, there still area residents, and especially on the north side, where there are TV antennae, and clothes lines hanging out. There are 220 buildings remaining for housing 3,000 residents.
    Some of the areas look like they could be trouble if you wander in the darker narrow streets at night on the north and east sides, and we went through the catacombs by the Peristil at night, and that also seemed like you need to be aware since it was desolate.
    The whole old town was a UNESCO heritage site designated in 1979. The streets are made to wander, and with four gates from all points on a grid, you should be able to determine your location. Those gates are Bronze at the south off the Riva, Silver to the East form the market area, the Gold to the north and the park are, and the Iron gate that leads to the fish market and newer part of town.

    This was emporer's palace - corner view of harbor Arched window views of old Outer walls with window overlooks for harbor View of east side homes-still occupied for some Peristil (courtyard) entrance from Riva Blvd
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