Trogir Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by croisbeauty
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by croisbeauty
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by croisbeauty

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Trogir

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    Ciovo

    by acemj Updated Mar 1, 2004

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    Just across from the Riva, you'll see the island of Ciovo, a quaint place that provides excellent views across the Trogir Channel to Trogir's medieval town. I only walked along the waterfront of Ciovo, so I can't tell you much more than that.

    Another obvious off the beaten path locale is, of course, Split. I think most people who visit Trogir are probable based in Split as I was. The bus will take you to the bus station just across a tiny bridge from the northern entrance to Trogir's medieval town.

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    Art galleries

    by FRONA Written Dec 16, 2003

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    Cock :)

    Trogir is full of charming little galleries. This was funny for me to see since I took a stroll down the street at 23 00 pm (was in the plane and on the road all day and needed fresh air) and peeked into this dark alley - the movement sensors switched on the lights and I got scared of the cock! :)

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    Solin-Old Medieval Name of Salona

    by BruceDunning Updated May 30, 2010

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    Manstrine of the 5th century church ruins
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    This was the main living center for the Illyrian Delmaeti tribe and in the Greeks used it for trading over many centuries in BC. The Romans continued that trading commerce that covered much of the inland regions. The creation of Christianity got a foothold here in 200-300AD, and many churches were erected without much disturbance by the Romans for the most part, even though they had to keep the profile low key. However, by 300-500 AD there were some enormous churchs built here. German Ostrogoths destroyed much of the town in the 4th century, and by that time the population was over 60,000 and covered at least 1 square mile. The Slavs and Avars ravaged the town in 641, and completely destroyed it for what reason? That forced Solin residents to take refuge in the nearly abandoned Diocletian palace in Split, so they had some protection with the walls as defense.

    The main areas are called Manastrine that was the little church outside the main town that was first built in 300's. After that over 300 years there were 3 main additions to the church to what the outline is today. The old town center in the middle was in a valley and the layout today to imagine it is fantastic. There are outlines of two churches, and many huge buildings of old. Excavation of the ruins started in about 1840's and the main digs was by F. Bulic, archaeological specialist in 1929-1940's. He studied much of the ruins and a great deal is located in Split museums today. The grounds are open daily 8-5 and it costs $5. There is also a dedicated area to Bulic in the Tusculum and a small museum up on the top floor.

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    The Church of St. Peter

    by croisbeauty Updated May 9, 2006

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    Crkva sv. Petra
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    The church was built in the 13th century while in the all current form is possesing the Baroque characteristics. Above the main doors be situated the bust of St. Peter.
    The church is situated in the central part of the old core of the town and you can easilly miss it when strolling around because all these short and narrow streets look alike.

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    The Church of St. Barbara

    by croisbeauty Updated May 9, 2006

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    crkva sv. Barbare
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    St. Barbara (St. Martin) is the oldest preserved church of Trogir. The church is a small basilica separated with colonnades. It is situated just a foot from the Trg Ivana Pavla II, right behind the Tower Clock and next to the Town Hall.

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    The Bell-tower of St. Michael

    by croisbeauty Updated May 9, 2006

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    zvonik crkve sv. Mihovila
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    The belltower of St. Michael stands right next to the Kamerlengo fortress. It is all what was left of the church which was completely destroyed. According to the locals, the church of St. Michael was one of the most beautiful church in Trogir.

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    The Old houses

    by croisbeauty Updated May 10, 2006

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    Trogir is an very typical Mediterranean town with lots of the medieval structures in its old core. Besides churches and palaces, there are many medieval houses of, more or less, very simple structure. Do not forget that it was settlement where most of its inhabitants were fishermen or hardworkers. Even poor in its structure, this houses are most charming.

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    Kastelas

    by BruceDunning Updated May 30, 2010

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    Kastela Gomilica built over a water moat
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    This stretch of the coast comprises seven separate, but connected villages/towns. Each has a population of 4,000-6,000, and the whole area totals about 43,000 residents. The strip is popular with tourism and in the summer many locals come here for the serenity and peaceful atmosphere.
    It is to the north of Split about 7 miles and goes for 12 mile length. You can take E8 road and then drive down to each off that road, or take a road that connects to all of them along the water coast.

    BAck even in Greek era this was a string of ports for commerce. Romans used it for the same purpose, and made floating harbors there. Later is became a resort retreat for the Croat, Hungarian and Venetian gentry. I cannot say enough how nice the setting is and you can walk the whole length if you like. We walked the last 3 miles that connect the last 3 towns and that is the closest between the towns.

    Kastela Gomilica was built by Benedictine nuns in 16th century, and this is the original design. The other castles and villages were built in 1500-1600 era for the most part, and so many of the original buildings are intact today.

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    Klis CAstle Fortress

    by BruceDunning Updated May 30, 2010

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    From of fortress on hilltop
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    The fortress dates back to the Illyrian DAlmatae tribe that used the hill for defense back in BC times. It was one of the most important strongholds from 2nd century BC through to 1800's. The fort is three tiers, one higher than the other so if intruders got through one segment, narrow passages and slits in the wall could defend the next level. The Romans used it for centuries to deter the frontier of the mountain range that separated the Romans form Ostrogoths and many other invaders. The fort became the ruling seat for many Croat kings, and they fought many battles form here. There were also a number of sieges, to no avail to takeover the fort. The Turks tried to take over the territory in 1500's, but the fort kept them at bay for a couple hundred years, but they finally took over. The Venetians did get control in 1648 from the Turks, and modified the fort for more modern defenses. The Austrians did the same thing when they got control in 1800's. They even modernized much of the inside for the residents. The fort was used in WWII due to its strategic location covering the huge valley below and the mountains above.

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    Solin Amphitheater and Community

    by BruceDunning Updated May 30, 2010

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    View of the seating area of the amphiteater
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    The amphitheater was built in the 2nd century and held 18,000 people. It was on the outskirts of the town and was part of the main defense walls. It was excavated in 1840 and the digging continued through 1940's by Frank Bulic, the main archaeological specialist for this town. The amphitheater was destroyed in 160's by Venetians who were fighting the Turks and did not wan them to use it as defense point if taken over. Over the years, the stones were used for other needs, and the remainder was scant ruins. Some of the wall were rebuilt in 1950's.
    It is open 8-5 daily and the fee is $5.

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    Primosten

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    View of island from the E8 road
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    Not more than 30 kilometers north of Trogir is another very nice island town that visitors stop to enjoy the scenery and old Medieval look. Wonderful scenery of this old Medieval village is the reason to come here. WE did not have time to stop, but got a couple of pictures of the long range view and landscape. The Turks tried to conquer this in 1542 but failed to do so. Beside being under Roman rule for centuries, the Venetians maintained control for nearly 500 years. Wine vineyards are the main commerce behind tourism and it is a UNESCO designated site.

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    Marmont's monument

    by croisbeauty Updated May 9, 2006

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    Glorijet
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    "Glorijet", the round colonnade of clasicist form was built in 1809, honouring the French marshal Marmont.
    The town of Trogir was shortly occupied by the French army, it had happened at the end of the 17th century.

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    The house of Petar Berislavic

    by croisbeauty Updated May 10, 2006

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    Kuca Petra Berislavica

    Petar Berislavic is a very important person from the history of Croatia. Actually, he was Croatian viceroy, the opponent of Venetians and heroic fighter against the Turks. Trogir is the town where he was born and lived.

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    Passage

    by croisbeauty Updated May 9, 2006

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    passageway
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    This is a typical and very characteristic passage you can see in almost all the mediterranean cities. That kind of the construction help the locals to be protected from the very severe winter-season wind called "bura".

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    Vitturi Tower

    by croisbeauty Updated May 9, 2006

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    toranj Vitturi
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    The Vitturi Tower is very well preserved. It dates from the 13th century and was a part of a thick defending city walls. The tower is situated on the southern side of the old town, towards the island of Ciovo.

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Trogir Off The Beaten Path

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