Porec Things to Do

  • Mosaics above church roofline
    Mosaics above church roofline
    by BruceDunning
  • Euphrasian Basilica (Porec, Croatia)
    Euphrasian Basilica (Porec, Croatia)
    by Redang
  • Roman Temple (Porec, Croatia)
    Roman Temple (Porec, Croatia)
    by Redang

Most Recent Things to Do in Porec

  • Maurizioago's Profile Photo

    The Euphrasian Basilica complex.

    by Maurizioago Updated Oct 6, 2011

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    The basilica is the third church that was built on this site between the 4th and the 6th century. The first church was dedicated to Saint Maurus and dated back to the second half of the 4th century. The present church was built by bishop Euphrasius in the 6th century. Inside you can admire several mosaics around the apse. They depict Christ with the Apostles. The Virgin and Jesus child; twelve female saints. Saints Maurus, saint Euphrasius and other saints.

    The church is part of a complex that includes a courtyard, a baptistery, a bell tower, and a bishop palace. This palace was built in the 6th century and houses a collections of religious artefacts. Under the palace various mosaics and roman remains are stored. The complex also includes what remains of the previous churches; a large floor mosaic of the first one and various stone walls.

    I have read on the web that all the complex is fully opened until october 15. From this date on you can only visit the church.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    North Tower

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 8, 2010

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    Stone tower and wall
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    This tower was built in 1473, and was a strong defense form land side attacks. The concern back then was the Turks trying to gain control form Venice. This tower is of eroding stone stacked high and cemented in some places, and inside has a small grotto effect that probably was for arsenal needs

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Round Tower & Pentagon Tower

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 8, 2010

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    View of Round Tower
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    These are two of three towers that are remaining from older days when there were nine towers of defense. They were on the outer perimeter of defense walls, when the old town was smaller. The Round tower was built in the second half of the 15th century, during Venetian control.
    The Pentagon Tower is from the same era, and it also is well preserved. There is a winged lion statue engraved.
    The real disappointment is that neither of these towers are for tourist viewing as a museum, or just a structure you can go inside and walk the stairs. Instead the Round tower is a cafe/bar and once you get to the top, you feel compelled to buy something. Then the price sets in. A beer was $5 and coffee $3. Then we got to the Pentagon tower, and again wandered up the stairs for a view. Well, this is an upscale restaurant, and again trying to be cordial, I ordered a beer and Micky had a wine. The outrageous prices here was 60 kuna, or $11. That is the price you pay for knowing not to venture too far, or turn around.
    Round tower is at Nardoni Trg and by the harbor edge. Pentagon Tower is Decumanus and Sv Eluterija-by Euphrasius church

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Romanesque House

    by BruceDunning Written Jun 8, 2010

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    Wooden veranda stands out on stone facade
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    This is a unique structure that is from the 13th century, and restored in 1930. The wooden veranda is the centerpiece of the architecture. The house has an exhibit room on the ground floor when open; not when we were there.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Temple Neptune-Roman Ruins

    by BruceDunning Written Jun 8, 2010

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    Temple Neptune ruin
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    This is located at the ti of the island just past Trg Marafor in the square. Take a street on the right side. The ruins are hidden unless you are on the water side, and even then not too visible. The temple was dedicated to the god of the Sea; Neptune. This temple is from the 1st century AD,and was part of a whole Roman Forum complex at Trg Marafor area. In Latin is is called Parentium. Also next to this temple is ruins of Temple of Mars, the largest Roman shrine in the Adriatic region. It also is from about 1AD.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Euphrasius Map-Bishop Palace and Treasury Museum

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 8, 2010

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    Map of the basilica complex
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    This is one of the highlights of the overall tour of the facility. It appears few people go into the Bishop Palace area, and if not reading are not aware of the great artifacts and reliquary inside, many religious icons and art, and private areas for the Bishops. It was all built in beginning of 553 along with the basilica, and took 20 years to complete. Take the tour; it is a large area to tour and very nice. This was just opened in 2000, and it is not widely explained, or promoted, but should be.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Euphrasian Oratory/Roman Floor Mosaics

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 8, 2010

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    Intricate artwork of mosaics
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    This is a remainder of a floor is from a later part of the 300's AD, when this was an oratory for the congregation to pray. It previously was a Roman house. The mosaics are very well preserved and the scenes tell tailing. To see this site, you need to pay an entry of $3 or $4 to get into the Bishop Palaces and the museum areas.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Euphrasius Tower and Baptistery

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 8, 2010

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    Tower behind the baptistery-next to it
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    The bell tower is well worth the trek up to the top for the view of the town. It was built in the 16t5h century. It is not very tall, at maybe 150 feet, and the steps are okay, but narrow. The octagon baptistery was build in the 6th century along with the basilica at that time. It has had some damage from weather and ravage over the years, but still maintains its original shape.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Euphrasius Church-the Courtyard Decor Views

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 8, 2010

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    Courtyard and entry to BAptisery
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    There is a lot of nice mosaics and ornate architecture in the courtyard that is in front of the church itself. To see all the wonderful sites, you need to look up and around; a lot of tourists do not.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Euphrasian Basilica

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 8, 2010

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    The main alter of the church
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    In 1997 the entire complex was designated a UNESCO heritage site, and for good reason. This has been very well preserved from the 553 year that construction began on the church. The first sacral structure was Maurus' Oratory from the last part of the 3rd century with part of the mosaic preserved. Maurus was a Bishop during the infancy of Christianity in the region, and yes, he became a martyr with Diocletian ridding those who believed in Christ. His remains are in the church.
    The decor of the church had Byzantine influence, and especially the mosaic works that is refined to great intricate details of a picture story. The complex is hard to show-but in another page is a map of the church layout for viewing. You are able to look into the courtyard, go up the bell tower, and especially a great treat is the Roman mosaics form the original church, a Bishopric living area, a museum, and many art pieces in a treasury area

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  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    THE GOTHIC HOUSE

    by alyf1961 Written Nov 22, 2009

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    THE GOTHIC HOUSE

    The gothic house is on the main old town street, Decumanus. The Gothic house was built in 1473 in gotico fiorito Venetian architectural style. Porec at this time was home to quite a few wealthy families that did not mind paying a lot for their houses to be as nice and modern as in Venice. The gothic house is one of them.

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    PENTAGONAL TOWER

    by alyf1961 Updated Nov 22, 2009

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    PENTAGONAL TOWER

    Is situated at the beginning of the central street, Decumanus, it is at the entrance of the heart of the old city. It was erected in the mid 15th century in Gothic style, with a relief of a Venetian lion on the facade. Up until the French occupation, parts of the city gates were preserved all the way up to the tower.

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  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    Basilica of Euphrasius

    by alyf1961 Updated Nov 16, 2009

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    MOSAIC
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    The basilica of St Euphrasius is a 6th century Byzantine church. It was built for bishop Euphrasius between 539 and 553. It was built by enlarging the existing St Maurus martyr, which had been on the sight since the 4th century. Some of the original floor mosaics still survive. The basilica was added to the UNESCO world heritage list in 1997.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Eufrazijeva bazilika, mosaics around the apse

    by JLBG Updated Jul 17, 2009

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    Angel and bishop ?
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    Around the apse are several mosaics that are difficult to photograph as there is very little room and that are half hidden. Enlarge for better view !

    The first photo shows only a part of a larger mosaic. On the left, one Saint in a golden circle is showing, while another is hidden. SCAFILICIT A S is written between them. On the right, an Angel is addressing to a seated person (bishop ?).

    On the second photo, this time on the right, there is again one Saint in a golden circle showing, while another one is hidden. The word SCAIUSTINA can be read. On the left part of the photo, a man goes out of a chapel while a Saint (the Virgin ?) is standing, facing another Saint that can only be seen on the third photo. It was completely distorted by parallax and I had to do extensive picture editing, which lowered the quality of the photo.

    Thanks to Leyle (TheWanderingcamel) for the following comment.
    The saint with the Virgin is certainly St Elizabeth, the mother of John the Baptist (the child behind the curtain). She was a cousin of the Virgin and the first person to be told the news that she was carrying the Son of God.

    The fourth photo shows a saint among fishes, that spreads its arms towards the head of two other saints. The mosaic is in bad condition.

    The fifth photo shows a mosaic in very bad condition. It seems to represent a bird, figured on top more or less as the Sun, with its rays around.

    Thanks again to Leyle for the following comment.
    The bird with the sun-like rays is a very typical Byzantine symbol of the Holy Spirit. The peacock in early Christian imagery is symbolic of eternal life - peacock flesh was believed not to decay, and the yearly shedding of the tail feathers and their bright and beautiful regrowth was regarded as a very potent symbol of Christianity's promise of rebirth in Christ.

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  • croatolog's Profile Photo

    Euphrasian Basilica

    by croatolog Written Dec 20, 2008

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    Euphrasian Basilica in Porec
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    The best way to feel the atmosphere of the Istrian cities is by experiencing its historical centers. There are many sights to visit in Porec, but one thing is not to be bypassed for sure. That is the Euphrasian Basilica, the best preserved early Christian monoument on the Mediterranean. Basilica was built in the 6th century, during the reign of the Roman emperor Justinijan and was named after Euphrasius, who at that time, was the bishop, but also the constructor of the Basilica. The church was originally named "Cathedral of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin", whereas over the years, the citizens of Porec have adopted the name of “Euphrasiana”.

    It is actually a cultural monument that was put on the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1996. In order to be given this status, Euphrasiana had to fulfill a great number of demanding UNESCO requirements. A large team of conservators assessed and evaluated every detail of the Basilica on the basis of its documentary, scientific and historical value. In order to understand the importance of Euphrasiana to its whole extent, we need to look at it from different angles, (historical, cultural, religious, aesthetic), and while the most visitors in Euphrasian Basilica marvel at the legendary mosaics that originate from the era of the prosecution of the Christians (4th century), i will turn your attention to the main apse of the cathedral where one can see an extraordinary artifact of time that profesor Ernest Bacher (head of the unesco team of conservators) and his crew marvelled at even more – the cathedral plaster!

    People who visited Porec and Euphrasiana in the same period when the conservators’ were in the Euphrasiana, tell some interesting stories, according to which the main conservator devoted more time to observing this plaster than the famous mosaic. I will quote Ivan Matejcic, a conservator from Rijeka, who when refering to this, wrote: “Every expert and scientist regards a monument primarily as a book that provides him with information from the past, and secondary as a cultural attraction”. The book, of course – the older it gets, the more valuable it is, especially if an unknown artist had written one of the pages with his trowel on the wall of this building, some 15 centuries ago ;)

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