Vukovar Favorites

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    Ovcara
    by diocletianvs

Most Recent Favorites in Vukovar

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Reconstructions

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 23, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the Police Station

    Favorite thing: Nowadays this is the seat of the local Police and was one of the first reconstructed buildings in the town of Vukovar. Police has very important role in the normalisation of every day life. It is multiethnic, composed by both Croats and Serba and I hope it works good.

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    Reconstructions

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 23, 2012

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    reconstructed school

    Favorite thing: Reconstructed school is waiting for the first students in the school year 2002/2003. It was totally demolished in 1991 during the Serbian agression. Every reconstructed building is rising hopes that life could be established again as it was before 1991. I know it sounds pathetic but this people here suffered alot and aren't much confident regarding their future.

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  • diocletianvs's Profile Photo

    The justice?

    by diocletianvs Updated Sep 27, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ovcara

    Fondest memory: Sixteen years after the Vukovar tragedy, the feel is bitter.
    No one was charged for the destruction of the whole town.
    No one was charged for the thousands of people that were killed, wounded or disappeared.
    The accusations of genocide were cleared off charges.

    The only people found guilty of the whole Vukovar tragedy were two generals of the Yugoslav army who were found guilty for the tragedy that happened on Ovcara.

    One was sentenced to 20 years. The other to 5 years. (>link)

    So, in total - it is 25 years. For 260 deads.

    That is 35 days in prison per one person killed in Ovcara.

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  • diocletianvs's Profile Photo

    VukoWar

    by diocletianvs Updated Oct 18, 2004

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    Vukovar

    Favorite thing: I hate counting people according to their nation or religion. I also hate proving that "this town or city belongs to this-and-this nation".

    But since I can expect a comment on this page starting with "Vukovar was a Serbian town, and they were only defending it from the Croats" I will include some numbers about the national profile of Vukovar's inhabitants before the war.

    1910: 10,359 inhabitants: 39,50% Croats, 15,70% Serbs, 33,80% Germans, 9,20% Hungarians, 1,80% others

    1948: 17,223 inhabitants: 63,50% Croats, 25,50% Serbs, 0,30% Germans, 5,30% Hungarians, 5,30% others

    1971: 30,222 inhabitants: 48,60% Croats, 30,20% Serbs, 0,20% Germans, 2,80% Hungarians, 18,20% others (mainly "Yugoslavs")

    1990: 44,639 inhabitants: 47,20% Croats, 32,30% Serbs, 0,20% Germans, 1,50% Hungarians, 18,80% others

    (Source: http://www.vukovar.hr/stanovnistvo.htm)

    Vukovar was not a town of neither Croats or Serbs. Before the war it was a peaceful multienthnic town in eastern Croatia. It had quite large Serbian population after the Ottoman invasion in 16th century, and also after the WWII when mostly Serbs and Yugoslavs were systematically settled here at the place of Germans who fled after the war.

    But regardless of the numbers and percents, I refuse to accept the theory that tries to explain the tragedy of Vukovar by the game with numbers.

    No numbers can be an excuse for the crimes done in Vukovar in 1990s.

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  • diocletianvs's Profile Photo

    VukoWar

    by diocletianvs Updated Oct 9, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Vukovar

    Favorite thing: "Modestly prosperous, sleepy, provincial town in eastern Croatia, near the border with Serbia. Known for its picturesque baroque architecture."
    This was the beginning of almost all descriptions of Vukovar before the war in Croatia in 1990s.

    But during the war Vukovar became more than a destroyed town. It became a symbol of all the destruction in Croatia during the war, of all the sufferings its inhabitants experienced.

    Vukovar suffered a three-month siege by Serb paramilitary forces and Serb-controlled Yugoslav army in 1991. After it was almost totally destroyed it was occupied by Serbian forces in November 1991. Once a town of 45,000 inhabitants it was the most comprehensively destroyed town of any size in either Bosnia-Herzegovina or Croatia during the wars of the first half of the 1990s.

    Destructions were also accompanied by the ethnic cleansing of Croats and all non-Serbs.

    For the next six years Vukovar was under the rule of rebel Serbian authorities in so-called 'Krajina' region, and was finally reintegrated with Croatia in 1998, under the process of "peaceful re-integration" of Eastern Slavonia.

    The reconstruction is under way. But the process is still slow and painful.

    Fondest memory: There are many sources about the tragedy of Vukovar. I will include links to few articles in English found on BBC website. BBC is usually considered as informative and objective,

    Vukovar massacre: What happened by Gabriel Partos
    Vukovar massacre haunts Serbs by Allan Little
    Profile: The 'Vukovar Three' by Tamara Kovacevic

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  • Nykaenen's Profile Photo

    Vukovar today

    by Nykaenen Updated Dec 19, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The house and memorial of Lavoslav Ruzicka, one of Croatia's Nobel Prize winners, was also destroyed (this is not his house; I had the photo but I deleted it not knowing it was his house).

    Lavoslav Ruzicka was born in Vukovar of Czech father and Croatian mother. He won Nobel Prize for discoveries in organic chemistry in 1939. More info at www.nobel.se .

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

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  • Nykaenen's Profile Photo

    Vukovar today

    by Nykaenen Updated Dec 19, 2003

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    Ulica dr. Franje Tudjmana

    Favorite thing: Further down the main street...
    It was Saturday afternoon, around 4 pm, and the city center was deserted except for our group. Don't wonder where most of the people were - they haven't returned to Vukovar yet. How could they? Where to? To these burned houses and offices?

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • Nykaenen's Profile Photo

    Vukovar today

    by Nykaenen Updated Dec 19, 2003

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    Favorite thing: This was a family house, most likely with 3 generations living in it - grandparents, parents and children (such households are still rather common in Croatia).
    Are they alive?
    Will they ever return?

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

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  • Nykaenen's Profile Photo

    Vukovar today

    by Nykaenen Updated Dec 19, 2003

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    Favorite thing: Tennants of this apartment building were lucky - no direct hits, only shrapnels and bullets...

    Can you imagine yourself living in that building, looking at the thousands of bullet holes every time you want to go home?
    Some of the tennants have returned five years ago... that's their daily routine.

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    • Historical Travel

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  • Nykaenen's Profile Photo

    Vukovar today

    by Nykaenen Updated Dec 19, 2003

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    Ulica dr. Franje Tudjmana

    Favorite thing: We usually build tips to show what a certain place is. The following tips will show you what Vukovar is no longer.

    This is the beginning of the main street - Ulica dr. Franje Tudjmana. The street wasn't called like that before the war. It also did not look like that. It has never looked like that.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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  • dabuwan's Profile Photo

    Devastation everywhere

    by dabuwan Written Feb 4, 2003

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    Central square of Vukovar.

    Favorite thing: Vukovar really impressed me. I am not a "war tourist" but it happened to me to visit countries where you still could see many reminders from recent wars, like Bosnia and others. But Vukovar is different: not just devastation everywhere, but you still can feel the hate and violence of the fights door to door. And the silence is astonishing.

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  • Nykaenen's Profile Photo

    Vukovar today

    by Nykaenen Updated Dec 19, 2003

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    Vukovar department store

    Favorite thing: This was the biggest department store in pre-war Vukovar.
    In the city center. This is the view of it from the "Cross" monument. I didn't go close to it. I didn't have to.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

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  • Nykaenen's Profile Photo

    Vukovar today

    by Nykaenen Updated Dec 19, 2003

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    Favorite thing: Nothing was left intact in Vukovar.
    If a house or a building was not leveled to the ground, then only walls survived.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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