Gradski trgovi - the City Squares, Zagreb

83 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Gradski trgovi - the City Squares
    by bonio
  • Gradski trgovi - the City Squares
    by croisbeauty
  • Gradski trgovi - the City Squares
    by croisbeauty
  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Air view of the city

    by croisbeauty Updated May 19, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    skyscraper on the main square
    4 more images

    For many years this skyscraper was a mockery of the city, in my opinion it still is a mockery no matter fact that was almost completely reconstructed just a few years ago. Ever since when was erected the skyscraper became the subject of various controversies, some have praised him while the majority of the citizens felt that it should be demolished because it disfigures the atmosphere of the main square.
    The architecture of main city square, which belongs to all the citizens of Zagreb, unreasonably was disfigured by this mockery of glass and concrete. This building, clad in glass, greatly differs from all other buildings and act as a "fist in the eye".
    After reconstruction the vantage point on top of a skyscraper again is open for the public, and it is the only positive thing about this ugly building.

    Was this review helpful?

  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Jelacic Square

    by HORSCHECK Updated Oct 17, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jelacic Square (Trg Bana Jelacica)
    3 more images

    The wide Austro-Hungarian styled Jelacic Square (Trg Bana Jelacica) is the busy heart of Zagreb. It is completely pedestrianised, although many tram lines cross the square.

    In the middle of the square a monumental horse statue of ban Josip Jelacic can be found. Its history dates back to 1866. The surrounding buildings represent several architectural styles (Classicism, Secession, Modernism).

    Directions:
    The Jelacic Square is located in the centre of Zagreb just between the Upper and the Lower Town.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Trains
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    The statue to Ban Josip Jelacic

    by croisbeauty Updated Sep 18, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Statue to Ban Josip Jelacic
    4 more images

    The statue of Croatian viceroy Josip Jelacic was dismantling and removal under the Communist government. In 1991the statue was put back in place.
    First the statue was situated on a different spot and turned towards Hungary, because the viceroy Josip Jelacic was chief of the command of the Austrian army which has succesfuly suffocated revolt of the Hungarians, at that time the part of K und K monarchy.
    Check in enclousure the old photo of Zagreb dating from the end of 19th century, it shows where the moument stood at that time.
    The statue is work of Antun Dominik Fernkom, from 1866.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • aukahkay's Profile Photo

    Trg bana Jelacica

    by aukahkay Written Oct 21, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jelacic Square
    2 more images

    Bana Jelacica square is the main square in the old town of Zagreb. Located at the base of the Upper Town, Jelacica Square is a hive of activity especially on Sundays where a large open market sells fruits, flowers and other items. Small lanes radiate out from the square including the main shopping street Ilica. An equestrian statue of General Jelacica stands tall in the middle of the square.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • monkeytrousers's Profile Photo

    Trg Jelacica

    by monkeytrousers Written Jul 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Trg Jelacica
    4 more images

    Trg Jelacica is Zagreb's main central square. The square is very attractive and is size strikes you coming from the small and narrow roads that lead into it. In and around the square you will find shops, cafes and bars. A lot of the trams routes also pass through here. In the centre of the square you can see a monument to Ban Josip Jelacic, a Croatian national hero afterwhich the square was named. In 1848 he defended the country from Hungarian invasion.

    Was this review helpful?

  • monkeytrousers's Profile Photo

    Parks Between the Train Station and Main Square

    by monkeytrousers Written Jul 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Train Station & Trg kralja Tomislava
    4 more images

    On the walk between the train station and the main city square you will go either through or alongside three beautiful continuous parks. First up is Trg kralja Tomislava which contains a monument and an exhibition centre. Next is Strossmajerov trg where you can find the Strossmayer Gallery of Old Masters followed by the fountains of Trg Nicole Subica Zrinjskog. You can often find stalls and commercial promotional people in this last square.

    The walk is very pleasnent and it takes about 5mins to walk the length of the parks.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Preradovicev Trg

    by mikey_e Written Jul 15, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Preradovicev trg
    1 more image

    You have to come to see Preradovicev Trg during the daytime so that, when you come here at night, you are not overwhelmed by the stimulation of so many people, so much music and so many bright lights that make up th vibrant Zagreb nightlife. During the day the square has plenty of people milling about, going to the various cafés and restaurants that line both the square and the streets tht lead off of it.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Statue of Kralj Tomislav

    by mikey_e Written Jul 15, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Statue of Kralj Tomislav
    1 more image

    Tomislav was a tenth century Croatian King and his statue is one of the first monuments you will see in Zagreb is you come in by train. It graces the beginning of Tomislavov Trg across from the station. The area around the statue is an open paved space where there may be free concerts and where, it appears, the government hands out free food to crowds of (mainly) pensioners in a bid to get them to pick up government sponsored information about health.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Trg bana Jelacica

    by mikey_e Written Jul 10, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Trg bana Jelacica

    Unfortunately my keyboard doesn't work all that well with Eastern European diacritics, but the name of this square should be pronounced ye-la-chee-tya. It is named after Josip Jelacic, a 19th century colonel who was elevated to the position of Ban of Croatia and support Vienna against hungarian rebels who sought to split from the Hapsburg empire during the 1848 Revolution. This is the most central part of the city and the place to come if you are looking for tourist information, a bank machine that definitely works with foreign cards, a currency exchange, the main tram lines and dozens of cafés and shops (including the large Znanje bookshop). If you are in Croatia during some sort of international event like World Cup or the Olympics, this is also where outpourings of national pride will take place. The square was originally called Harmica because this is where the Hungarians collected taxes (from the Hungarian harmincad or thirtieth) and its name was changed again between 1945 and 1990, when the Communists christened the square Trg republike.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Santini738's Profile Photo

    Tomislav Square

    by Santini738 Updated Jul 1, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tomislav Square
    1 more image

    Tomislav I (died in 928), was one of the greatest rulers of Croatia in the Middle Ages. He reigned from 910 until 928, first as Duke (dux Croatorum) of Dalmatian Croatia in 910–925, and then became first King (rex Croatorum) of Croatian Kingdom in 925–928.

    He was probably the son of Muncimir, Duke of Dalmatian Croatia. Tomislav was one of the most prominent members of the House of Trpimir. He united the Croats of Dalmatia and Pannonia into a single Kingdom in 925. Tomislav rounded off his state from the Adriatic Sea to the Drava River, and from the Raša River in Istria to the Drina River. Under his rule, Croatia became one of the most powerful kingdoms in Medieval Europe.

    Tomislav defeated the Magyar mounted invasions of the Arpads in battle and forced them across the Drava River. Tomislav annexed a part of Pannonian Croatia to his Croatian Dalmatia. This included the area between the rivers Drava, Sava and Kupa, so his Duchy bordered with Bulgaria for a period of time. This was the first time that the two Croatian Realms were united, and all Croats in one state.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Santini738's Profile Photo

    Ban Jelačić Square

    by Santini738 Written Jul 1, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ban Jelačić Square is the central square of the city of Zagreb, named after ban Josip Jelačić.

    It is located below Zagreb's Upper Town and directly south of the old Dolac market on the intersection of Ilica street from the east, Radićeva street from the northwest, the small streets Splavnica and Harmica from the north, Bakačeva street from the northeast, Jurišićeva street from the east, Praška street from the southeast and Gajeva street from the southwest.

    Jelačić square is the most common meeting place for people in Zagreb. It is not particularly accessible by car, but it is the main hub for trams and pedestrians. ZET tram lines 1, 6, 11, 12, 13, 14, 17 traverse it by day, and 31, 32 and 34 by night.

    Was this review helpful?

  • yumyum's Profile Photo

    Main square (Trg bana Josipa Jelacica)

    by yumyum Written May 6, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    This is the heart of the city. This is also were the VT meetings start ;)) if the members actually decide to show up. The square is very busy, luckily not with cars but with blue trams. Several lines comes through here. There is also a big clock which serves as a meeting point. The tourist office is also located here and there is the big statue with the rider. Along the square you find cafés, shops and a bakery.

    Was this review helpful?

  • hello3001's Profile Photo

    Flower Square

    by hello3001 Written Apr 17, 2007
    Preradovic Square
    2 more images

    This is Petar Preradovic Square (dedicated to Croatian poet) a place where you can always buy fresh flowers therefore another name so often used for this square - flower square. You can find an internet cafe on this square.

    Was this review helpful?

  • hello3001's Profile Photo

    Jelacic Square

    by hello3001 Written Apr 9, 2007
    Jelacic Square
    1 more image

    Jelacic Square is the main square in the centre of the city. It is a meeting point, a place where you can find tourist information centre and next to it a map of the city. In the info centre you can find different brochures and one of them is 'Zagreb in your pocket' a publication with the main information about the city and it also contains the map of Zagreb.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Docu2001's Profile Photo

    It resonates ...

    by Docu2001 Updated Mar 29, 2007

    Recently I found myself in Zagreb, the capital of Croatia. It’s a beautiful city, wonderful old buildings, a bit falling down but charming and strong reminders of the Empire during which it was built, the remainders of which echo yet in its side streets. This city seems somehow to bridge the East and the West and the Balkans of mind and heart. On Sunday morning the central square was filled with farmers, dozens of stalls stocked with fresh fruits and vegetables and to one side the cheese mongers set off by themselves, with their hand-made cheeses, wrapped in sharp white cheese cloth, the attendant grandmothers on short stubby stools waiting for customers but patiently so, unlike the fruit vendors who searched the market with their eyes for business, these older ones sat patiently and tended their cheeses, not unlike one might tend a sensitive beast. The cheeses were for the most part white and simple, from the goat and tasted of the barnyard, yet wonderfully so, savory cheese it was, genuine and robust and so much so that one could almost imagine it squeezed fresh from the teat. Maybe it was just the scene, the aroma of the marketplace or the solid pose of the mistress of the cheese, immovable she seemed, a part of the place – inexorable.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Zagreb

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

74 travelers online now

Comments

View all Zagreb hotels