The Cathedral, Zagreb

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  • Cathedral of the Assumption (2012)
    Cathedral of the Assumption (2012)
    by HORSCHECK
  • The Cathedral
    by Ines_
  • Inside the Cathedral of the Assumption (2004)
    Inside the Cathedral of the Assumption...
    by HORSCHECK
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    Cathedral of the Assumption

    by HORSCHECK Updated May 20, 2013

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    Cathedral of the Assumption (2004)
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    Zagreb's main landmark is the Cathedral of the Assumption. The original church was badly damaged by sieges of the Tartars and by an earthquake.

    The two impressive bell towers (104 and105 m) were erected in Neo-Gothic style at the beginnig of the 20 th century.

    On both my visits of Zagreb in 2004 and 2012, the cathedral was at least partly scaffolded.

    Directions:
    The Cathedral of the Assumption dominates Zagreb's upper town (Gornij grad). This part of the town is known as Kaptol.

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  • planxty's Profile Photo

    The city landmark.

    by planxty Updated Feb 1, 2013

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    Cathedral of the Assumption, Zagreb, Croatia.
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    This place has to be right up on the list of "must sees" in Zagreb. Indeed, you can't avoid seeing it, as it dominates the city skyline with the twin 300 plus feet towers making it visible from just about anywhere.

    I believe it is properly called the Cathedral of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary and St. Stephen and Ladislav, but is locally just known as the Cathedral and, as I hope my photos convey, it is truly impressive, despite the ongoing restoration work to the outside.

    Like so many old religious buildings, this one is the result of many renovations and restorations with the first Cathedral probably being in the 12th century, believed to have been destroyed when the Tartars attacked Zagreb.

    The present Neo-Gothic building mostly dates from post 1880, when huge damage was caused by an earthquake. It was designed by Hermann Bolle.

    The supplementary photos show a couple of the numerous beautiful shrines within the Cathedral, and also a statue of the crucifixion. Above it, you will se an inscription in a language I had never seen before, but I have been told it is the fore-runner of the modern Croat language.

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  • Ines_'s Profile Photo

    Zagreb’s Cathedral

    by Ines_ Written Jul 14, 2012

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    Zagreb’s Cathedral is the landmark of the city and the tallest building in Croatia. It has a gothic architecture and its construction started on the 11th century. But with so many setbacks (invasions and earthquakes) today some work is still being done on the towers.

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  • aukahkay's Profile Photo

    St Mark's Cathedral

    by aukahkay Written Oct 23, 2010
    St Mark's Church
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    Zagreb’s main square until the 19th century is home to the neoclassical Sabor (parliament) and the baroque Banski Dvori (Ban’s Court Palace). The centerpiece is Crkva Svetog Marka (St Mark’s Church), best known for its eccentric red-white-and-blue tiled roof featuring the coats of arms for Zagreb and the Kingdom of Croatia, Dalmatia and Slavonia, which was added to this 13th-centueryy building in 1880.

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  • aukahkay's Profile Photo

    Zagreb Cathedral

    by aukahkay Written Oct 16, 2010
    Zagreb Cathedral
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    The Zagreb Cathedral is located in the Kaptol part of Zagreb. The Zagreb Cathedral dominates the skyline with its neo-Gothic style, while the Renaissance walls surrounding it are rare preserved examples of their kind in this part of medieval Europe.

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  • craic's Profile Photo

    I am not that fond of churches ...

    by craic Written Apr 30, 2009

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    They are doing work on the turret.

    ... but I was wandering around town with a friend so we went in to have a look at the Cathedral. I am also not very fond of the European habit of having embalmed bodies on display. I find it slightly repellent and unhygenic.
    My friend didn't know who the body had once belonged to and I asked around and found it had belonged to Aloysius Stepinac who was Archbishop from 1937-1960. He has been beatified by Pope John Paul II.
    But, like so much else in this part of the world, it is all rather complicated and problematic.
    If you want to know more google his name and you will find a lot of info about an interesting man living in interesting times.

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  • Arkeolog's Profile Photo

    St Stephen’s Cathedral

    by Arkeolog Written Mar 23, 2009

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    St Stephen���s Cathedral
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    St Stephen’s Cathedral is undeniably Zagreb’s most magnificent building. The decorations, both inside and out, attract the most visitors of any building in the city and its Neo-Gothic facade makes it a favourite subject for photographers.

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  • montezaro's Profile Photo

    Kaptol

    by montezaro Updated Sep 22, 2007

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    Kaptol
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    Kaptol is situated immediately north of the Main Square - Trg J.Jelacica - and it is home to the Cathedral, the famous cafe street Tkalcicava and the city's most modern mall, Centar Kaptol.
    The Cathedral of the Assumption dominates the Kaptol, its glowing towers you see off in the distance is the most immediately recognisable and commanding feature in town. It is an ornate and impressive wonder of neo-Gothic artistry. The cathedral was founded in 1093, heavily damaged in 1242 after various sieges by the Tartars, then again in 1625 after wave of fires. But the bad luck goes on, in 1880 it was seriously damaged during an eartquake. In 1990 exterior renovations set in motion to battle against the wearing affects of time. It continues to the present days, and even the most serious official will tell you they don't know when will be completed.

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  • monkeytrousers's Profile Photo

    Cathedral of the Assumption of the Blessed V. Mary

    by monkeytrousers Updated Jul 26, 2007

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    This nice attractive cathedral with its attractive twin gothic spires can be found at Kaptol. It used to be dedicated to St Stephen but because the stone chapel which is dedicated to the Virgin Mary kept overflowing because of its popularity the dedication for this cathedral was changed to try and encourage more people to worship here instead.

    There is a nice fountain in the courtyard outside. You can also see some of the 16th century fortifications around the cathedral here.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    The Archbishop's Palace

    by mikey_e Written Jul 11, 2007

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    Turret from the Archbishop's Palace

    The Archbishop's Palace actually surrounds the Cathedral and is notable for its many turrets. It was once called a "southern Kremlin" by the archeologist Arthur Evans. The turrets are supposedly ivy-cloaked, although the one I got a picture of was bare. In any case, you cannot enter the Palace as a tourist; just admire it from afar.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Gothic-lover's delight

    by mikey_e Updated Jul 11, 2007

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    The Cathedral
    1 more image

    The Cathedral was built by the Austrians von Schmidt and Bollé in 1880. The original structure was lost in a masive earthquake. Only some of the renaissance choir styles and a mediaeval fresco survived the terrible catastrophe. In the late 19th century, it was felt that Zagreb needed something with large spires to convey its grand status, so most of the work and money was spent on the spires than on the interior. You can see an effigy of Archbishop Stepinac, Croatia's controversial archbishop during the Second World War, inside the church. There is also a relief of the Archbishop kneeling before Christ by his mock grave.

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  • yumyum's Profile Photo

    Cathedral Marijina Uznesenja

    by yumyum Written May 6, 2007

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    This wonderful structure was first founded in 1093/4 and it took many centuries to become what it is now. The first consecreation was in 1217 but already in 1242 the Tatar invasion did some heavy damage to it. Various fires did their share and it was constantly rebuilt and extended like from 1880 onwards when the twin towers were added. A lot of worshippers visit the cathedral daily, so be considerate when taking pictures. Inside there are a lot of treasures to be seen.

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  • hello3001's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral

    by hello3001 Written Apr 9, 2007
    in front of the Cathedral
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    The Cathedral is still being repaired but nevertheless it is a stunning structure. It is one of the trademarks of the city and, along with the statue of King Tomislav, a detail very often used to portrait the city.

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Zagreb Cathedral

    by antistar Updated Nov 19, 2006

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    Zagreb Cathedral
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    The Cathedral, with its distinctive twin spires, is probably Zagreb's most prominent building. Its spires are tall and slender, and soar up to 105m in height above Kaptol where it sits. The original cathedral was built here long ago in the 12th centuries, but an earthquake in 1880 meant that most of it was rebuilt more recently.

    Perhaps the most interesting feature of the cathedral is its fortifications. Because of the threat of Turkish invasion, the whole cathedral was fortified, including a renaissance wall and tower to the south that was used as an observatory to spot Turkish troops.

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  • Avieira67's Profile Photo

    Zagreb Cathedral

    by Avieira67 Updated Sep 9, 2006

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    The Cathedral

    The Cathedral of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary was built in several eras during the history of Zagreb. As a consequence, one can see the different influences. The towers were built at the bare end of the 19th century.

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