Famagusta Off The Beaten Path

  • Marble ?graveslab?.
    Marble ?graveslab?.
    by leics
  • Lovely carved flowers on the building.
    Lovely carved flowers on the building.
    by leics
  • Marble frieze, with animals
    Marble frieze, with animals
    by leics

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Famagusta

  • om_212's Profile Photo

    Aya Trias Bazilica: mosaics of 6th century A.D.

    by om_212 Updated May 18, 2007

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    On the way back from Apostolos Andreas Monastery (half way to Famagusta) we have noticed a path and a something resembling a sign leading to the ruins of the Aya Trias Basilica. it was dark, and we hardly could find the place. but looking for it was worth the effort.

    there was the box office at the entrance, but since it was after hours, it was closed. well, the gate was not :)

    inside we have discovered beautiful floor mosaics, floral and geometrical patterns, in unbelievably good condition (taking into account that lay open air, no coverage a top
    of them. well, it doesn't rain often in Cypris, but still...

    inscription in Greek(?) geometrical pattern floral pattern not proud of myself, i shouldn't have done it :(
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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    Maras - Varosia, the forbidden city

    by call_me_rhia Updated Nov 10, 2007

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    Maras (also known as Varosia) is Famagusta's the forbidden city - a city within a city, uninhabited, abandoned, deserted, closed off to people, locals and visitors alike. Once upon a time in this area of town there was a thriving and wealthy Greek community - then in 1974 before the advancing Turkish Army they fled to the south and never returned.

    I'm not sure this is the real story behind it... the area is sealed off with barbed wire, photography is not allowed and its streets cannot be walked, but you can stand by the "allowed" side of the fence and look into it. We saw houses with plates and glasses seen on the tables, and an old battered suitcase left on a window, as if someone was leaving in a hurry and had decided carrying his/her own suitcase would have slowed their escape.

    Maras has left me puzzled. We did not see anyone near the area, except a few children from a nearby house, an old man and three UN vehicles. Despite begin a safe place, I felt very much uncomfortable and was longing to get away from it... something in the recent present went awfully wrong there, and I have the feeling that the stories told, by both sides, are hiding something... something I may not want to know.

    maras on the right, the

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  • Pinat's Profile Photo

    Incirli Cave

    by Pinat Updated Sep 4, 2011

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    Incirli Cave is in the small village of Cinarli. The cave gets its name from the fig tree that stands outside the entrance to the cave itself (Fig means "incir" in Turkish).

    Incirli Cave is a natural formed cave and is one of the largest caves on the island. The cave is 100 metre long and 10-15 metre wide passage down which contains an amazing collection of stalactites. After successful efforts of the administrator of Cinarli Village, the cave was prepared and opened to the public in 1995.

    You can get to the Incirli cave by taking the road north from the village of Gecitkale. Watch out for the signs leading to the cave and Cinarli Village.

    The cave is open on Sundays as well as weekdays and requires a small entrance fee.

    Please call Mustafa prior to your visit. He is responsible for access to the cave.

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Poke around the cathedral courtyard.

    by leics Written Jan 4, 2010

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    It's worth spending a while poking about, because there are several interesting chunks of masonry dotted about the place, including a marble ?graveslab? which is propped on two small (possible ancient Roman) pillars. I couldn't read the inscription, as it is in Greek. I would not b surprised if some of the marble stonework came from ancient Salamis.

    And if you look into the buildings adjoining the cathedral (used as storage areas) you'll see a wonderful wooden bier. I wonder if it's still used for funeral processions?

    The building itself still has the remnants of some lovely Gothic carving.....much of that on the cathedral has been eroded away, or removed.

    It's always worth poking about....you never know what you'll find! :-)

    Marble frieze, with animals Marble ?graveslab?. Lovely carved flowers on the building. Funral bier
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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Poke around in the Citadel.

    by leics Written Jan 4, 2010

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    As ever, there are bits and pieces of interest to seek out, easily missed when looking at the grand scale.........

    ..........a store of unused cannonballs.......

    ......a beautifully carved shield, presumably Venetian.......

    .......another carved shield, half destroyed........

    .......such skilful arches in the roof, with a stone boss holding all in place.........

    I'm sure there is more, if you take time to seek it out.

    Hidden cannonballs Venetian shield Partial shield Beautiful vaulting
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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Don't miss the Roman bits!

    by leics Written Jan 4, 2010

    It would be easy to walk through the site of the Venetian governor's palace (opposite the cathedral), now gardens, without noticing the various Roman statues and carvings dotted about.

    I imagine they all came from ancient Salamis, which is hardly any distance away up the coast.

    The sarcophagus is particularly well-carved.

    Once a palace, now gardens. Rather superb marble sarcophagus Once a griffon, perhaps?
    Related to:
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    • Archeology
    • Architecture

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Famagusta Off The Beaten Path

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