Fun things to do in Famagusta

  • Lala Mustafa Pasha mosque
    by Pinat
  • Things to Do
    by Pinat
  • Famagusta
    Famagusta
    by travelthrough

Most Viewed Things to Do in Famagusta

  • Pinat's Profile Photo

    Glapsides Beach

    by Pinat Updated Sep 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It is the best beach in Famagusta. It's a pretty long sandy beach with lots of umbrellas. The sea is quite shallow, making it really convenient for families with little children. July and August are not really the best months for spending time on beaches of Famagusta. At noon time it is almost 40 degrees (celcius). June and September are the best months.

    There are two cafes on the beach if you want to stay away from sun. The food is nice and the drinks are always cold. At the weekends two cafes throw beach parties together.

    If you don't have a rental car, you can take a taxi to the beach. The price is again pre-fixed. It was 10 TL in summer 2011.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Casino and Gambling
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pinat's Profile Photo

    The Royal Palace

    by Pinat Written Sep 3, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It was originally the Royal Palace of the Lusignans, built in the 13th century, just opposite the St. Nicholas Cathedral (now Lala Mustafa Pasha Mosque). In this palace that the Kings and Queens of Cyprus were crowned until the reign of Peter II in 1369. It was ruined by an earthquake and today we see the L-shaped remains of this palace of the Lusignans. Beyond and inside the courtyard, you can see numerous cannon balls and pieces of a large granite column.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Casino and Gambling
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pinat's Profile Photo

    Namik Kemal Dungeon and Museum

    by Pinat Written Sep 3, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Namik Kemal (1840-1888) was a nationalist poet and novelist, spent 38 months in this dungeon when he was sent into exile by the Ottoman Sultan in April 1873 soon after the first performance of his play 'Vatan or Silistre' at Gedik Pasha Theatre in Istanbul. The play promoted nationalism and liberalism, and was considered dangerous by the Ottoman Sultan. He was pardoned by Murat V in June 1876, and returned to Istanbul.

    The two-storeyed stone dungeon was built, during the Ottoman era, on the ruins of the old Royal Palace. When Namik Kemal came to Famagusta, he first stayed at the ground floor, but after a while he was taken to the second storey with the permission of the Cyprus Governor, Veysi Pasa. The steep stone stairs at the side of the building take you to the second storey which has two large windows, marble floor and a timbered ceiling.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Casino and Gambling
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pinat's Profile Photo

    Canbulat Bastion (Arsenale) and Museum

    by Pinat Written Sep 3, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Canbulat (Djanboulat) was one of the high-ranking Ottoman soldiers during the conquest of Cyprus in 1570-1. He took part in all of the operations.

    According to an old legend about his martyrdom , Canbulat drove his horse on the big grinding knife which was mounted by the Venetians to the entrance of the Arsenal in order to prevent the advance of the Ottoman Army. Thus he was martyred but the doors for the conquest of Famagusta were opened for his army. He was buried in the grounds of the same bastion, for which he had given his life and a tomb was erected over his resting place.

    The precincts leading to Canbulat Tomb have been converted into a museum in 1968 and it owns many fine examples of the Turkish folk art.

    If you happen to be in this neighbourhood during late afternoon and if you are in the mood for a late lunch or early dinner, try Can-Bulat Bufe next to the museum.

    Related to:
    • Casino and Gambling
    • Family Travel
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pinat's Profile Photo

    The Historical Walls of Famagusta

    by Pinat Written Sep 3, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The old city of Famagusta is surrounded by the historical walls, which are massive and date back to mediaeval times. The walls stand intact to this day and they are really well preserved.

    The city walls built by the Lusignans were very high but thin. After the Venetians captured the island from the Lusignans, they brought over specialists from Venice to fortify the walls against artillery fire particularly to protect themselves from the Ottomans. The walls we see today are the ones built by the Venetian specialists.

    One of the most popular resting place for both the locals and the tourists is Gloria Jean's near Gulseren District. If you walk from Gloria Jean's to the historical center, you will be walking along these huge walls. You will smell the sea, hear the waves but you will not see the sea, which is kind of nice.

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Family Travel
    • Casino and Gambling

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pinat's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Varosha - Ghost Town

    by Pinat Updated Aug 30, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I'll be writing about "Varosha" under the "things to do tip" but visiting Varosha is not actually possible unless you are travelling with a Turkish or UN soldier. As my husband was doing his military service at the time, we were able to enter this zone and I was totally shocked to see how great this area was.

    Varosha was one of the hottest tourist destinations during the 1970s. There were many fancy hotels and restaurants in the town to meet the touristy needs. During Turkish intervention in 1974, Turkish Cypriots stayed within the city walls of Famagusta whereas Greek Cypriots started moving towards the southern edges of city. Thinking that the tension wouldn't last long, the local residents of Varosha left all their possessions behind and kept moving south to avoid the gun fire.

    After the cease fire, Varosha was made part of the United Nations buffer zone. Today the area is under the control of Turkish Armed Forces and only military personnel can enter the zone freely.

    We took a taxi to see the deserted town. Neither taxis nor military vehicles can make stops in the area. There is a military building, which once was a five star hotel on the coast. The only place the vehicles can stop is in front of this building.

    It was not hard for me to imagine how lively and crowded this touristic town once was. Since 1974, Varosha has remained untouched. Today weeds have taken over the streets, the buildings are gradually crumbling, and the lovely, sandy beach is deserted.

    It is not allowed to take pictures. I was able to take one picture only, the one of an abandoned hotel. I also added pictures we borrowed from one of my husband's soldier friends to show you pre-1974 Varosha and today's Varosha (aerial view).

    Was this review helpful?

  • travelthrough's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Patisserie Petek

    by travelthrough Updated Sep 21, 2010

    A must see attraction for everybody visiting Famagusta. Right next to the entrance of the ancient gate to the city you will find Patisserie Petek, a wonderful place to enjoy the finest and most delicious pastries and sweets. They also have home-made ice cream! An experience you will never forget!!

    Was this review helpful?

  • Arkeolog's Profile Photo

    Gothic Architecture of Magusa

    by Arkeolog Updated Apr 28, 2010

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gazimagusa will make you delighted. Your tour will be unforgettable because of the other buildings in Magusa influenced by gothic architecture, including the Catholic churches of St. George and St. Peter-St. Paul, and the Orthodox St. George Church. There are also many other buildings with arches, windows and decorations that use gothic themes, even if the buildings are not completely built in gothic style. Sometimes one finds gothic windows or pointed arches decorating an entrance to a building, which proves how much Cyprus has been affected by gothic architecture.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Gaze from afar at Maras (Varosha).

    by leics Updated Jan 4, 2010

    A sticking point, this place....a pawn in a powerful game which has not yet ended. A bargaining chip, perhaps.

    The 'dead zone'.

    A little bit of Maras is still inhabited, but the rest......well, after the 1974 ceasefire it became UN territory.

    The 'dead zone'. Few are allowed to visit.

    The modern hotels which line the beach rot gently in the sea air, just like the ancient churches of the old town.

    I saw it only from afar, from the top of the Citadel. You could walk nearer, if you wished, but the road would eventually end in barricades and 'forbidden zone' signs.

    I wonder if matters will ever be peacefully sorted out? Not for a substantial length of time, I fear......

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Spot the ancient tree.

    by leics Written Jan 4, 2010

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This ancient and venerable sycamore fig tree outside the mosque/cathedral is said to be as old as the building...........possible, but pretty much unprovable.

    It certainly provides welcome shade for the benches underneath.

    It is said to be a sycamore fig which was climbed by Zaccheus in his efforts to see Jesus, in the Bible story.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Arkeolog's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Archaeological Museum

    by Arkeolog Updated Feb 25, 2009

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Archaeological Museum and The Monastery of St. Barnabas is at the opposite side of the Salamis-Famagusta road, by the Royal Tombs. The next building is archaeological museum now and displays variety artifacts from Cyprus.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Arkeolog's Profile Photo
    3 more images

    Ancient City of Salamis-Magusa

    by Arkeolog Updated Feb 23, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The ruins of the ancient city of Salamis are located right next to the legendary blue waters of the Mediterranean, giving it a unique combination of history and natural beauty. With sand dunes reminiscent of North Africa to the south, but covered with wildflowers in springtime, Salamis is also one of the strongest and best fortified cities in the Mediterranean basin. As you wander through the ruins, you can feel the power and glory of old. When you enter the ruins of Salamis from the side facing the sea, the first place to visit is the gymnasium. Gymnasiums were important public places in ancient cities. Here is where in ancient times people played sports, received lessons on physical and mental health and held small sports competitions. In the colonnaded courtyard, young people would play sports and children would listen to teachers explaining lessons. Although these people are long gone from Salamis, the columns that witnessed those days and the statues around the pool are still here. The magnificence of the amphitheatre in Salamis is an indication of the glorious days of old. Although the actors, audience and scenery have been lost in the past, it is very exciting to think of the cheers and applause that once filled this theatre. Other ruins in Salamis include temples, baths, an agora, churches, homes and cisterns.

    In my opinion, best time to visit Salamis (also whole Cyprus) is spring and early summer or end of september. If you visit Salamis in spring, you'll see a beautiful Salamis with yellow fennels.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Old Kirtikli Bathhouse

    by call_me_rhia Updated Nov 19, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of my favourite sights in the old town of Famagusta is what is left of the Kirtikli Bathhouse - the old Hammam. When it was built it must have looked impressive - this complex used to have six domes and an underground water reservoir underneath, covered by a vault.

    There was boviously also a dressing room, but its roof has collapsed. And if memory serves me well, of the original six domes, at least two are still standing. Obviouslt it is no longer used as a hamman, but attached to its ruins a fancy old hallam bar has now been opened.

    Was this review helpful?

  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Sinan Pasha Mosque

    by call_me_rhia Updated Nov 19, 2007

    Sinan Pasha Mosque is another mosque that used to be a Christin church. Back then it was called Church of St Peter and Paul and was built in 1359 - this one too in 1571 iwas "adapted" and converted into a mosque by the Ottoman Turks.

    It has had many uses in the past - and not all were "holy": the Brits used it to store grain and potatoes while the Turkish-Cypriots more recently turned it into a town hall. And now... it is still not a religious building; officially it should be the public library by the Ministry of Education and Culture, but when I was there it appeared to be closed, if not exaclt abandoned.

    Was this review helpful?

  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Palazzo del Proveditore

    by call_me_rhia Updated Nov 19, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Opposite Lala Mustafa Pasha Mosque, on the othrt side of the main square, you can see interesting ruins od the Palazzo del Proveditore (The Royal Palace), the place where Kings and Queens of Cyprus were first crowned - until the building of the Cathedral (then turned into a mosque).

    This palace, in later centuries, was also used as a prison. The great poet Namik Kemal (1840-1888) spent his thirty-eight months in thithe dungeon of this palace/prison. Not much remains of this building today, just some L-shaped ruins with some columns and arches, including one with the coat-of-arms of Giovanni Renier, Captain of Cyprus in 1552. In what would have been the courtyard, there are some old cannon balls and pieces of a large granite column.

    Was this review helpful?

Famagusta Hotels

Latest Famagusta Hotel Reviews

Kaya Artemis
48 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 23, 2014
Salamis Bay Conti Hotel
256 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 13, 2014
Long Beach Resort
79 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 10, 2014
Grecian Park Hotel
393 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
Palm Beach Hotel
3 Reviews & Opinions

Instant Answers: Famagusta

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

67 travelers online now

Comments

Famagusta Things to Do

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Famagusta locals.
Map of Famagusta