Kythrea Salamis Travel Guide

  • What lies beneath?
    What lies beneath?
    by leics
  • Late afternoon sun across the gymnasium
    Late afternoon sun across the gymnasium
    by leics
  • Beautiful fresco fragment
    Beautiful fresco fragment
    by leics

Kythrea Salamis Things to Do

  • leics's Profile Photo

    by leics Updated Jan 2, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Set just beyone the amphitheatre, these new excavations are ongoing during the warmer months.

    So far they have uncovered a fishmarket, and adjoining agora (market place) with some wonderful carved columns, and a goodly section of paved road.

    I hope they will continue to expose and conserve more of this wonderful site, for so very much remains hidden.

    If you visit in summer you may be lucky enough to see archaeologists in action.

    At other times, just enjoy wandering what has been exposed so far......and keep your eyes open for pot sherds, for there are hundreds dotted about (don't take them away with you though). You could be touching something no-one else has touched for thousands of years: a strange and exciting feeling.

    Recently excavated  agora (marketplace) Ongoing excavation site
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    by leics Written Jan 2, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    They are damaged, and gradually being more damaged by exposure (imo), and not easy to spot.....but there are some lovely mosaics still left in situ around the bath-house ruins.

    You'll have to wader in an out of the rooms to find them....make sure you check under any domes, because these structures have provided the shelter which has enabled the mosaics to survive.

    The litle that remains underlines just how sumptuous a building this must once have been.

    Mosaic 1 Mosaic 2 Mosaic 3
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kythrea Salamis Hotels

    0 Hotels in Kythrea Salamis

Kythrea Salamis Warnings and Dangers

  • leics's Profile Photo

    by leics Written Jan 2, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As with all ancient sites in Cyprus (and especially so in the north) you need to think about what you wear on your feet and where you are walking.

    Don't expect nicely laid-out paths and EU health & safety regulations; they probably won't exist.

    There are rough stones, hidden holes, chunks of masonry hidden amongst the grasses.......it is not dangerous, but walking the site does require some caution.

    Wear shoes with a good grip. It's not a place for flip-flops (thongs)!

    Not necessarily a smooth walk
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Kythrea Salamis Off The Beaten Path

  • leics's Profile Photo

    by leics Written Jan 2, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Salamis was not constructed in one go, then left.

    In the same way as modern towns, and modern buildings, changes and improvements were made over decades and centuries.

    You can see this most clearly if you look at some of the chunks of masonry lying around. The chunk in the photo clearly shows a whole sequence of flooring layer, from basic opus signinum (the pink concrete so favoured by the Romans) through a layer of pebbled flooring to opus signinum again (probably overlaid with now-missing mosaic or opus sectile, the geometric marble flooring seen elsewhere on site).

    Like the re-use of stones in the tip above, I think seeing the changes which occurred on just one floor helps to create a real sense of a living, evolving city and community.

    Layers of history.......
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    by leics Written Jan 2, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Salamis suffered from earthquake damage several times during the centuries it existed as a powerful city-kingdom (and before that too).

    If you keep your eyes open you may well see evidence of the re-use of building stone as buildings were repaired and restored.

    this section of wall is within one of the bath-house rooms,. It would originally have been covered by frescoed plaster (or mosaics) but now the bare stone is exposed you can see chunks of columns from previous buildings have been incorporated into the wall.

    Finding things like this helps me to understand just how old such places are, and how long they existed as living communities.

    Spot the columns?
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    by leics Written Jan 2, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Don't miss the inscriptions set into the floor of the gymnasium's east portico (almost certainly originally roofed over to provide shade).

    There are two that I noticed, carved into marble slabs and set into the foor. They are dedications to people who, probably, provided funds for elements of the original building (I can't read ancient Greek, so I hope this interpretation is correct).

    It's likely that they were set into the walls than into the floor (it is rather disrespectful to walk upon such inscriptions) but were wrongly placed there when the site was excavated and conserved.

    They are easy to miss though, so keep your eyes open.

    Inscription 1 Inscription 2
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Kythrea Salamis

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

79 travelers online now

Comments

Kythrea Salamis Travel Guide
Map of Kythrea Salamis

View all Kythrea Salamis hotels