Castle, Prague

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 372 Reviews

Prazsky hrad

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • The Old Royal Palace
    The Old Royal Palace
    by Xeriss
  • View of Prague Castle hill from across the river
    View of Prague Castle hill from across...
    by Jefie
  • View of Prague Castle hill from the Old Town
    View of Prague Castle hill from the Old...
    by Jefie
  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Prague castle

    by fachd Written Dec 18, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Prague castle is massive with an area of almost 7.28 hectares. It is a UNESCO World Heritage site. The history of the castle stretches back to the 9th century. The head of State like the president of Czechoslovakia rule the country from here. Also Kings of Bohemia and Holy Roman Emperors did rule from Prague castle. Within the castle are St Vitus Cathedral, Basilica of St George and also gardens, defense towers and are all open to public. Prague Castle is the centerpiece of the Czech capital. The towers of Prague Castle can be seen from virtually anywhere in Prague.

    The Prague Castle is open daily:
    5.00 - 24.00 in the summer season (April 1 - October 31)
    6.00 - 23.00 in the winter season (November 1 - March 31)
    Historical monuments are open daily except 24.12.
    9.00 - 18.00 in the summer season (April 1 - October 31)
    9.00 - 16.00 in the winter season (November 1 - March 31)

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture
    • Music

    Was this review helpful?

  • eugini2001's Profile Photo

    Prague castle complex

    by eugini2001 Written Sep 9, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    st.vitus
    4 more images

    We bought family admission which covers 2 adults and 1 child for 700 Cr, which is quite a bargain. We didn’t even see all sites that it covers, because we were so tired to see all, our tickets were good for the second day though, but we didn’t have that 2d day.
    The history of Prague began with the foundation of Prague Castle (reminds me Kremlin in Russia) in the 9th century. Despite fires and invasions, the castle has retained churches, chapels and towers from every period of its history, from the Gothic splendor of St.Vitus’s Cathedral to the 16th century Renaissance additions. The courtyards date from 1753-75, when the whole area was rebuilt in the late-Baroque and neo-Classical styles. The castle became the seat of Czechoslovak president in 1918 and the current president of the Czech Republic has an office here.
    According to our ticket, first site is Old Royal Palace. Although the first big thing that attracts your attention is St. Vitus’ Cathedral. From the time Prague Castle was first fortified in 11th century, the Old Royal palace was the seat of a long line of Bohemian kings.
    The vast palace complex consists of three different architectural layers. A Romanesque palace, built around 1135, forms the basement of the present structure. Over the next 200 years, two further palaces were built above this-the first by Premysl Otakar II in 1253 and the second by Charles IV in 1340. On the top floor is the massive Gothic Vladislav Hall, with the splendid rib vaulting. Designed for king Vladislav Jagiello, it was completed in 1502. The Rider’s Staircase just off the hall, is a flight of steps with magnificent Gothic rib-vaulting ceiling. It was used by knights on horseback to get to jousting contests.
    Under Habsburg rule, the palace housed government offices, courts and old Bohemian parliament.
    When you explore the castle, be ready for steep and narrow stairs. The castle itself is rather gloomy and dark, you can feel medieval atmosphere there, nothing like luxury or glamour, more scary and halloweeny. It has a beautiful Prague view from windows though!
    You will not miss St.Vitus’s it just at the entrance, huge building that reminds me famous French Cathedral that saw inquisition. Maybe that’s why it’s so scary with its gargoyles (on the ornate west front, gutter spouts are given their traditional disguise as gargoyles, they look disgusting and ugly, my daughter did a research and said they were made this way on purpose to scare night thieves and bad spirits ), gloomy and dark. As for a bit of history, work began on St.Vitus’s, Prague’s most distinctive landmark in 1344. Architect Peter Parler was largely responsible for the grandiose Gothic design, though the building was not completed for another 600 years. The cathedral contains the tomb of Good King Wenceslav and some fine works of art including an exquisite Alfons Mucha window in Czech Art Nouvean style. Golden Portal was the main Cathedral entrance until the 19th century and it is still used on special occasions. Above it is a mosaic of the last Judgment by 14th century Venetian craftsmen. Rose window was designed by Frantisek Kysela in the 1920 (present entrance),the window above the portals depict scenes from biblical story of the Creation. The skills of architect Peter Parler are clearly seen in the delicate fans of ribbing that support (Gothic vaulting) the three Gothic arches of the Golden Portal.
    Next is my personal favorite –St.George’s Basilica and Convent. It was founded by prince Vratislav in 920 and is the best preserved Romanesque church in Prague. The huge twin towers and austere interior have been restored to give an idea of the church’s original appearence.The tomb of Vratislav I, located opposite the presbytery. Also buried in the church are Prince Boleslav II and Princess Ludmila (grandmother of St.Wenceslas) who was murdered in 921 and revered as the first bohemian saint. Other point of interest a rare early 13th century painting, new Jerusalem, in the chore vault.outside the south portal of the church features a 16th century relief depicting St. George and the dragon.
    Zlata ulicka.
    The picturesque artisans’ cottages along the inside of the castle wall were built in the late 16th century for castle’s guards and gunners. A century later, the goldsmiths moved in and modified the buildings. However, by the 19th century the area had degenerated into a slum and was populated by Prague’s poor and criminal communities. Golden lane has, however, been home to well-known writers such as Franz Kafka who stayed at No.22 with his sister around 1916-1917 and Jaroslav Seifert, the Noble Prize-winning Czech poet.
    Dalibor Tower
    It takes its name from the first man to be imprisoned in it. It is indeed, a jail for Nobel men with all torturing stuff in it. I don’t like sites like this, but it is a history.
    The story of Prague castle
    It’s a museum , very interesting and quite big one, worth visiting, has a lot of interesting things –archeological and historical ones.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • BLewJay's Profile Photo

    The biggest castle in the world

    by BLewJay Updated Aug 6, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The castle gounds
    4 more images

    After taking the funicular up/down Petrin Hill, we headed off on our next adventure...climbing the stairs to the Prague Castle (Pražský hrad). The castle (a UNESCO World Heritage site) is where the Kings of Bohemia, Holy Roman Emperors and presidents of Czechoslovakia and the Czech Republic have had their offices and also where the Czech Crown Jewels are kept.

    The walk up the stairs provides a spectular view of not only the castle and St. Vitus Cathedral, but also of the city...simply amazing!!! Once you reach the walls of the castle, there are two guards protecting the entrance...a wonderful ceremony occurs where there is a changing of the guard. If you get the opportunity to see it, you won't be disappointed.

    Within the walls, there are so many things to see and do, but the most imposing building that you come upon is Saint Vitus' Cathedral (Czech: Katedrála svatého Víta). It's a Roman Catholic cathedral in Prague, the seat of the Archbishop of Prague, tombs of many Bohemian kings and Holy Roman Emperors and an excellent example of Gothic architecture.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Xeriss's Profile Photo

    Prague's Jewel

    by Xeriss Written Jun 24, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Old Royal Palace
    4 more images

    Prague castle, or Pražský hrad as it is known in Prague, is one of Prague's most significant monuments and therefore definitely a must see. Plan ahead and allocate at least 2 days of your trip to see the Castle. When we first bought the entrance ticket, we didn't realize that the ticket is, in fact, valid for 2 consecutive days. This gives you more time to look around and explore each section of the castle.

    The ticket costs 350 czk and grants you access to 9 locations/galleries/exhibitions within the castle:

    (1) The Old Royal Palace
    (2) The Story of Prague exhibition
    (3) St. George's Basilica
    (4) Convent of St. George
    (5) Golden Lane
    (6) Prague Castle Picture Gallery
    (7) St. Vitus's Cathedral
    (8) Rosenberg Palace
    (9) Powder Tower

    The castle is quite a busy tourist attraction, however, due to its proportions, you don't normally have to queue and there's a reasonable amount of space within which you can walk comfortably. Be careful of pickpockets. They are everywhere, especially in front of St. Vitus's Cathedral.

    While we were there, there was a man who got robbed and he didn't realize until it was too late. He was taking photos of the Cathedral and a man approached him to ask him if he'd be willing to take a photo of him with the Cathedral in the background. The man, put down his briefcase on a bench nearby to be able to take the photo. Little did he know that another man was waiting for just that - for him to lay down his things so that he could take them. By the time we heard the man shouting and calling for help, it was too late to even identify the man who had asked for the photo. They had both left the scene. The man was robbed of his laptop and passports.

    Food and drinks are available in certain spots within the castle. Food is slightly pricey so if you're on a budget, you may want to pack your own lunch and drinks.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

    Was this review helpful?

  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Prague Castle

    by kris-t Updated Apr 28, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Prague Castle
    4 more images

    The Prague Castle (Prazhski grad) is the castle in Prague where the Czech kings, Holy Roman Emperors and presidents of the Czech Republic (and Czechoslovakia) have had their offices. The crown jewels of the Bohemian Kingdom are kept here. Prague Castle is one of the biggest castles in the world (according to Guinness Book of Records the biggest ancient castle) at about 570 meters in length and an average of about 130 meters wide.

    The castle buildings represent virtually every architectural style of the last millennium. The Prague Castle includes gothic St Vitus Cathedral, romanesque basilica of St. George, a monastery and several palaces, gardens and defence towers. Most of the castle areas are opened to the tourists.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • gordonilla's Profile Photo

    A night time visit to Prague Castle

    by gordonilla Written Feb 5, 2012
    Exterior (1)
    4 more images

    I was able to have a walk through the castle grounds after dark with a colleague. Sadly it was to late in the evening to visit any of the attractions, but it was indeed an odd sensation to be walking through the offices of the President of the Czech Republic.

    It was cold and quite dark, there were military guards present and the Presidential flag was flying over the castle. I am told he must have been at home.

    We walked up on side of the castle then down through a rear entrance - it took some time to walk through the squares and gates that were still open to the public, even though it was well after 21.00.

    Was this review helpful?

  • dat123's Profile Photo

    Lubkwitz Castle

    by dat123 Written Nov 2, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    residence
    1 more image

    This is a side tour within prage castle area. It was on of the most interesting things to do there, Its amazing how the family lost all there blongings to plunder of two wars and to be able to get everything back again is unbelievable

    While in there go to cafe and get the apple strudle its the best thing !!! ah my yum yum

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • Skibbe's Profile Photo

    Prague Castle

    by Skibbe Written Sep 5, 2011
    4 more images

    This is actually more of a complex with several historical sites up on a hill overlooking the river and the city. When I was there, key parts were closed but I did get to see the Royal Palace, which was the most interesting part, and St. George's Basilica. There are also amazing views of Prague from up here.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Rosenberg Palace

    by Nemorino Updated Jun 3, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1. View from the Rosenberg Palace
    2 more images

    Also included in the "short visit" admission ticket is the Rosenberg Palace, which was originally built as a Renaissance palace for the aristocratic Rosenberg family. In the eighteenth century it was rebuilt in Baroque style. Starting in 1756 it was used as a "residence for unmarried women from insolvent noble families."

    One apartment in the Rosenberg Palace (second photo) has been furnished to look like the apartment of a noble lady living in the Institute in the eighteenth century, using antique furniture and other items from the depository of Prague Castle.

    For most of the twentieth century the palace was used for offices of the Interior Ministry and later the Castle Administration. After a thorough restoration, the palace was opened to the public in April 2010 for the first time in its history.

    Second photo: This is how the apartments might have been furnished in the eighteenth century for unmarried noblewomen who lived there.

    Third photo: An eighteenth century mousetrap (with mouse) and toilet box in the Rosenberg Palace.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Views of Prague from the Old Royal Palace

    by Nemorino Written Jun 3, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1. Prague from the Old Royal Palace
    1 more image

    As long as you don't let yourself be defenestrated you can have some fine views of Prague from the Old Royal Palace.

    Charles Bridge is in the center of the first photo.

    Second photo: The Vltava (Moldau) River from the Old Royal Palace, looking downstream.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    The Old Royal Palace

    by Nemorino Written Jun 3, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1. Entrance to the Old Royal Palace
    2 more images

    The second Prague defenestration took place here in the Old Royal Palace in the year 1618, when a group of angry Protestants bribed their way into the castle and threw three Catholics out of a third-storey window, two high Catholic officials and their secretary. This was one of the incidents that set off the dreadful Thirty Years' War, which devastated much of central Europe and killed off two-thirds of the German population.

    Amazingly, the three people who were defenestrated actually survived their fall from the third-floor window. The Catholics claimed they had survived because angels intervened to save them. The Protestants said it was because they landed in a soft pile of horse manure.

    (The first Prague defenestration happened nearly two centuries earlier, in the year 1419, when seven members of the city council were thrown out of a window of the city hall. All seven were killed, either by the fall or by the angry mob that was waiting out in the street.)

    Second photo: Vladislov Hall in the Old Royal Palace.

    Third photo: All Saints Church in the Old Royal Palace.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Pražský hrad = Prague Castle

    by Nemorino Written Jun 3, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1. People in the castle courtyard
    1 more image

    They call it "the largest coherent castle complex in the world." with an area of almost 70,000 m².

    There are two types of admission tickets, the "long visit" and the "short visit". I took the short visit, so I missed out on the Powder Tower, the Picture Gallery and a permanent exhibition called "The Story of Prague Castle".

    Second photo: Looking up at the castle and cathedral, with the river and Charles Bridge in the foreground.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • cassini's Profile Photo

    Prague Castle

    by cassini Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Possibly the largest (570 by 100 metres) castle in the world. Founded in the second half of the 9th century and continuously built since then, it contains both St Vitus Cathedral (see below) and the palaces which are now the seat of Czech parliament. Also behind the cathedral is St George's Basilica which is well worth seeing.

    Inside the Royal palace is Vladislav Hall, used for formal occasions and the presidential elections, it has a fantastic vaulted roof. Also the room itself is about 50 metres long. There are many other richly decorated rooms here for one to see.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tracyden's Profile Photo

    Changing of the Guard

    by Tracyden Written Oct 12, 2010

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Waiting to be changed
    1 more image

    Changing of the guard takes place at 12pm at the palace. The music is great - more like the music from a sci fi film - very catchy.

    You can have your picture taken with the gate guard who stand still as a statue.

    Look up at the side of the gates a two large and quite scary statues.

    It is a bit of a trek up the hill to the palace - but it's worth it and good for the thigh muscle, so set off in good time.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Prague Castle

    by mallyak Written Sep 29, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Prague Castle is the largest medieval castle complex in Europe and the ancient seat of Czech kings throughout the ages. It is Prague's premier tourist attraction.
    Several destructive wars and fires (and the subsequent renovations), along with differing political forces have combined to create an intriguing mix of palaces, churches and fortifications.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Prague

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

67 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Castle
4.0 out of 5 stars
21 Opinions
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.5 out of 5 stars
19 Opinions
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
200 Opinions
0.2 miles away
Show Prices

View all Prague hotels