Franz Kafka's Prague, Prague

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  • Franz Kafka Museum in Prague
    Franz Kafka Museum in Prague
    by Jefie
  • Statue in front of the Kafka Museum
    Statue in front of the Kafka Museum
    by Jefie
  • Inside the eerie Franz Kafka Museum
    Inside the eerie Franz Kafka Museum
    by Jefie
  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka Museum

    by kris-t Updated Oct 22, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Franz Kafka Museum
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    Franz Kafka (1883-1924) is one of the greatest figures of 20th century world literature. He is the best known and world-renowned representative of Prague German literature.

    The museum presents:

    - most of the first editions of Kafka's works
    - letters, diaries, manuscripts, photographs and drawings never before displayed in Prague
    - 3-D installations
    - five audiovisual pieces and a soundtrack specially created for the exhibition
    (printed guide sheets to lend (Czech, English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Japanese, Rusian, Korean and Chinese))

    Opening hours - daily 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

    Entrance fee - CZK 180: Adult

    - CZK 120 reduced price for students, seniors and disabled person

    - CZK 490 Family Ticket (2 Adults, 2 Children)

    guided tour prices: entrance fee + for guide CZK 500 for a group to 15 persons or entrance fee + CZK 30 /person for group over 15 persons
    - CZK 45 Franz Kafka's Prague Map, CZK 490 Exhibition catalogue

    See more about Bizarre Sculpture by David Cerny before the museum. Click here for video of Kafka Museum fountain.

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka Museum in Prague

    by Jefie Updated Mar 31, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Inside the eerie Franz Kafka Museum
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    Franz Kafka was born in Prague in 1883 and is perhaps the world's most famous Czech author. Some of his most celebrated works include The Metamorphosis, The Trial, The Castle and The Judgement. Prague's Kafka Museum was inaugurated in 2005, and it gives visitors a unique chance to immerse themselves in the life and universe of the celebrated author. Through numerous letters and work fragments, the exhibition explores Kafka's love-hate relationship with Prague, his tense relation with his father, his relations with women and contemporary artists, and his struggles to combine his real passion - writing - with a job he disliked. All of this information is provided in an unsettling Kafkaesque atmosphere, which adds a lot to the visitor's experience. The museum is also home to a nice souvenir shop that sells all of Kafka's works along with a nice selection of biographies.

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  • yvgr's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka Museum in Prague

    by yvgr Written Apr 19, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kafka in Prague

    Franz Kafka wrote his novellas and most works in German, but he was a Czech and his presence can be found here and there in modern Prague. Kafka didn't like Prague that much but he studied at the university here. He died of tb while still a young person. His body was brought back to Prague and was buried in the new Jewish cemetery.

    The Museum is warm and friendly. Order your ticket at the shop and then go forth to the House where the exhibition is. If you're claustrophobic the Museum's virtual sections may be a bit spooky, but it's a very informative place to learn more about Kafka's life and his writings.

    I'll give **** stars to this Museum.

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  • FruitLover's Profile Photo

    Kafka and "Prague circle"

    by FruitLover Updated Nov 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hebrew: in this house Franz Kafka was born
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    Kafka (1883-1924) is regarded as one of the best writers of the 20th century. The term "Kafkaesque" has become part of the English language.

    Was born to Jewish parents.

    The pictures show the house in which he was born, on the Old Town Square next to the Church of St Nicholas, now contains a permanent exhibition devoted to the author.

    Jews were prominent in the cultural life of Prague. Their contribution to German literature was most significant. The group of Prague-German-Jewish authors which imerged in the 1880s, known as the "Prague circle" (Der Prager Kreis), achieved international recognition, and icluded Franz Kafka, Max brod, Franz Werfel' Oskar Baum, Ludwig Winder and more.

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  • Skibbe's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka Museum

    by Skibbe Updated Sep 5, 2011

    I knew almost nothing about Prague's most famous writer before I came here. But I decided to visit this museum which does a good job taking you through his life and themes. I bought a copy of "Metamorphosis" there and enjoyed reading it (though I still don't have a clue what is was about). That's why I love travel.

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka Museum

    by Nemorino Written Jun 3, 2011

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    1. Entrance to the Franz Kafka Museum
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    This unusual and wonderfully creative museum consists of a long-term exhibition called "The City of K., Franz Kafka and Prague", which originated in another city entirely, namely Barcelona, where it opened in 1999. Numerous people from Barcelona were involved in creating the exhibition, which seems to have benefited enormously from their insights and fresh input.

    After Barcelona, the exhibition was moved to the Jewish Museum in New York, where it was shown in 2002-2003. Then in 2005 it was finally installed in Prague, the city where Franz Kafka was born in 1883 and where he lived, worked and wrote for most of his life.

    For me this museum was a series of memory jogs, since I read most of Kafka's books and stories nearly half a century ago.

    One of the things I learned at the museum was that Kafka's day job was not nearly as senseless as he made it out to be. Kafka claimed to hate his office job, and in his stories he often wrote about people who were helplessly caught in the web of a mindless bureaucracy, in situations that are now often described as "Kafkaesque".

    But at another level Kafka was a diligent employee who was rightfully proud of his accomplishments at the Worker's Accident Insurance Institute, where he worked for many years in a department devoted to preventing industrial accidents. He wrote the department's annual reports on factory safety, and was even promoted to department head shortly before he had to resign because of illness.

    My personal connection to this is that my Canadian/American grandfather, who was only five years younger than Kafka, was the managing director of the National Safety Council in the United States from 1913 to 1942, so he was very much involved in industrial accident prevention throughout his working life. (But otherwise my grandfather was a very different sort of person who never even read any of Kafka's books as far as I know.)

    (Yes, this is the same grandfather who was booked on the maiden voyage of the Titanic in 1912, but changed his booking at short notice for business reasons. No doubt his narrow escape from the sinking of the Titanic reinforced his life-long interest in safety and accident prevention.)

    Second photo: A poster at the entrance to the Franz Kafka Museum at the Herget Brickworks.

    Third photo: Ticket to the Franz Kafka Museum.

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Statue of Franz Kafka

    by Raimix Updated Jan 31, 2010

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    Franz Kafka depicted here as riding on the shoulders of headless man. Actually it is based on Franz Kafka story, named “Description of a Struggle” where young mane rides on another man through streets of Prague.
    The statue stands here from 2003, author – David Vavra. I think is good idea to show writer acting in his own written scene.

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    House "U minuti"

    by Raimix Updated Jan 31, 2010

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    Minute house (U minuti) is one of Renaissance buildings here, well preserved example. The façade is full of sgraffito decorations that present such famous Habsburg family personalities as Philip II of Spain, Rudolph II, Maxmilian II. House was built as gothic in 15th century, later reconstructed (16th century) into Renaissance forms.

    House is famous for one of its former resident – Franc Kafka. He lived here from 1889 – 1896.

    This popular tourist spot has interesting name “Minute house”. It is actually nothing associated with short time. Actually it came from words “at the diminutive”, as tobacco at this house was sold at very little pieces.

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Golz - Kinsky palace

    by Raimix Updated Jan 31, 2010

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    Kilian Ignaz Ditezenhofer designed this palace in rococo style. Palace looks quite solid and colorful comparing it to other buildings around old town square. Later, family of Golz sold it to Kinskies in 1768. It was used by communist leader Klement Gottwald to gather party members here. Kafka’s father had a shop there and nowadays it serves a place for art exhibitions.

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  • a5floor's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka

    by a5floor Updated May 9, 2009

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    Franz Kafka

    Franz Kafka is a famous writer. He lived between 1883 and 1924. He lived in Prague all his life. His famous work is the novel The Trial.

    Today you will find his house at Old town square (where he lived between 1889 and 1896). This house is shown in the picture with this tip.

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  • canaglic's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka

    by canaglic Updated Oct 10, 2008
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    This little mother has claws." Franz Kafka spent most of his life in Prague, even though he always felt like a stranger there -- a German-speaking Jew in a predominately Czech Catholic town. Consequently, there are many sites in Prague that are of some interest to fans of Kafka's work.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    kafka museum

    by doug48 Written Jun 21, 2008

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    kafka museum

    the kafka museum has collections on the life and works of franz kafka. franz kafka (1883-1924) is prague's most famous writer. kafka's most famous work was the "trial". a must see site for those interested in franz kafka.

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  • franzk's Profile Photo

    Stop of mystifikations about Kafka

    by franzk Updated Sep 29, 2007

    Hi to all,
    let me introduce firstly. I am cultural manager working on project about Franz Kafka and his travels. I, together with my colleague search for all places, where used to travel Franz Kafka.

    Here are our results: www.franzkafka.info

    Resume of our research which we do together with other Kafka experts:

    - Kafka wasn´t unhappy guy, living all his life in Prague
    - he was crazy about travelling
    - he visited around 60 different place all around Europe as Germany, Austria, France, Italy, Hungary, Slovakia...
    - for inspiration read his Travell diary, where he is discribing about his impressions.

    - Kafka didn´t go to orthodox Jewish school
    - Kafka never lived in Golden Lane, this small flat was rented by his sister Ottla. She needed some meeting place for her and her boyfriend, after couple of weeks she decided to rent this flat to Franz, but he never sleep there! He always stayed there only during day and around midnight went to his family house. So please dont listen crazy fairy tales of touristic guides
    - Kafka´s best friend was Max Brod, no Albert Einstein, Gustav Janouch (author of crazy book fool of lies called "Interview with Kafka"
    - Kafka hadn´t any kid
    - Kafka wasn´t active in communistic party as some guides also tells to tourists.

    Please if you have any more questions let me know I am open to tell you more about Kafka and his travels.

    My skype is: kafkaproject

    Thanx and enjoy "real" Prague not that which is presented to touristis as strange theatre, done only for effect.

    judita

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  • Bjorgvin's Profile Photo

    The St. Michael Mystery

    by Bjorgvin Updated Jul 25, 2007

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    In the Old Town just off Old Town Square is the Magic Church (or St. Michael’s Church), which originally dates from the 11th century. The light and sound show presented on two distinct levels (thematically linked) inside the church is a journey through the history of Prague. On the lower level of the church are depicted 12 scenes taken from the works of Franz Kafka, but on the upper level a video-show with special effect following the history of Prague from it's earliest days.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka Statue

    by nicolaitan Written Oct 7, 2006

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    Located immediately next to the Spanish Synagogue, this statue was unveiled in December 2003, the work of sculptor Jaroslav Rona. It is based on an early work describing one man walking through the streets of Prague on the shoulders of another. In this statue, the upper figure is Kafka himself with his trademark Homburg hat. The figure below has, obviously, no head and perhaps is a suit without a body - meant to charactize the beaurocracy Kafka disliked so much.

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