Franz Kafka's Prague, Prague

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  • Statue in front of the Kafka Museum
    Statue in front of the Kafka Museum
    by Jefie
  • Franz Kafka Museum in Prague
    Franz Kafka Museum in Prague
    by Jefie
  • Inside the eerie Franz Kafka Museum
    Inside the eerie Franz Kafka Museum
    by Jefie
  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Monument to Franz Kafka

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Dec 17, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Between the Churhc of Saint Spirit and the Spanish Synagogue there is the monument to Franz Kafka one of the most important Czech writers. In my opinion the monument should be represent the Invisible Man.

    Monument to Franz Kafka
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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka Statue

    by nicolaitan Written Oct 7, 2006

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    Located immediately next to the Spanish Synagogue, this statue was unveiled in December 2003, the work of sculptor Jaroslav Rona. It is based on an early work describing one man walking through the streets of Prague on the shoulders of another. In this statue, the upper figure is Kafka himself with his trademark Homburg hat. The figure below has, obviously, no head and perhaps is a suit without a body - meant to charactize the beaurocracy Kafka disliked so much.

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  • Christina1881's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka and Prague

    by Christina1881 Written Jul 21, 2006

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    “Ignored in the author’s lifetime, burned by the Nazis, and suppressed by the Communists, the works of Franz Kafka are at last being celebrated in the city of his birth.” (“Prague”, 2005, Thomas Cook Publishing)
    Kafka was born in Prague in 1883 (died near Vienna, Austria) and the city echoes in his stories as it did in his life.
    Devotees of Kafka’s work can follow his trail through Prague – to his one-time workplace (Na Poøíèí 7), to the house he rented in Golden Lane on Castle Hill (No 22), and finally to his grave in the Jewish Cemetery at Strašnice (Metro line A to Želivského).
    There is also a Franz Kafka Museum (the picture is of the entrance) unfortunately I am not able to find the address at the moment, I will keep looking though! (Do you know of the museum and do you have the address then I would really appreciate if you would send it to me – THANKS!)

    Entrance to the Franz Kafka museum
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  • JeSuisJill's Profile Photo

    Great area for souvenirs and Touring

    by JeSuisJill Written Jan 27, 2006

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    The Franz Kafka Museum is located in an area not far from Prague Castle. So, it will be easy to do both during your stay.

    Prague Castle is the OPPOSITE direction of the Kafka Museum when you exit the metro. To get the castle, you need to walk up a long flight of stairs, however, there are plenty of suvenir and crafts carts in which to spend money along the way.

    At the top of the hill you pass two castle guards and enter the palace area. Inside THERE you'll find more expensive and elaborate stuff to buy, a restaurant and a massive cathedral. It is a phenomenon!

    Outside the Kafka museum I laughed Cathedral inside the palace Palace Guards
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  • rexvaughan's Profile Photo

    The City of Kafka

    by rexvaughan Updated Nov 28, 2005

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    Kafka is certainly one of Prague?s more famous sons, so it seemed appropriate that there is a museum dedicated to his life and work focused on Prague. As Kafka is a variation from the norm, so is the museum. For starters there is the unusual rotating statue urinating in a pool in front of the entrance. The inside is divided into two sections, ?Existential Space? and ?Imaginary Topography.? The museum has an impressive colledction of his drawings, photographs, manuscripts, letters, and diaries as well as first editions of all Kafka?s works. There are also 3-D installations and audiovisuals with soundtrack created for this exhibit. It is one of the more creative museums I have seen as it does seem to give you some of the ?existential? feel for Kafka and his city. There are lots of things related to Kafka in Prague, including his home and the building where his father?s clothing business was located. I recommend this museum to give you good intro to his life.

    Open daily 10:00-18:00. Admission 240 Kc

    Museum entrance No comment
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  • chbuchie's Profile Photo

    Kafkacity

    by chbuchie Updated Nov 16, 2005

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    Not only in the library and bookshops but also all around Prague will you find trailmarks of one of the biggest writer of the past century

    Next to one of the synagogues in the Jewish quarter a large statue of Franz was erect , depicting one of his characters.
    In the beginning of the Golden Lane you'll find the house of Kafka, well actually he just stayed a few months here with his sister, but it sells
    The house is installed like a museum, with artefacts, costumes and weapons of the middle-ages. In the back end you can even shoot some crossbow.

    Frans Kafka was a Czech-born German-speaking writer who only became famous posthumously with his novels expressing the alienation of 20th century man, more precisely dehumanization, bureaucratic labyrinths, and totalitarian society . Kafkaesque characters are trademarks of his writing. His health issues added other issues like fear of physical and mental collapse in his stories.
    Kafka admitted in Letter to His Father (1919) : "My writing was all about you; all I did there, after all, was to bemoan what I could not bemoan upon your breast. It was an intentionally long-drawn-out leave-taking from you."
    The Castle and The Trial ( or lack of trial as he describes so well) remain his 2 most famous novels.
    In 1924 Kafka died of TBC.

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  • vesna04's Profile Photo

    House of Three Kings

    by vesna04 Written Nov 11, 2005

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    Franc Kafka lived in the House of Three Kings nearly eleven years during his high school and university study. The house is in late Gothic style. Kafka had a simple room on the first floor facing the street.

    The house of three kings

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  • jil_coleslaw's Profile Photo

    Frank Kafka Museum

    by jil_coleslaw Written Sep 23, 2005

    The Prague opening of the long-term exhibition The City of K. Franz Kafka and Prague takes place in summer, a time of special significance for Kafka. He was born here on 3rd July 1883, died in a sanatorium at Kierling on 3rd June 1924, and was buried in Prague on 11th June.

    The City of K. opened in Barcelona in 1999 and transferred in 2002 to the Jewish Museum in New York, and in 2005 opened in Prague at Hergetova Cihelna.

    The exibition has got two sections - Existential space and Imaginary Topography.

    The exhibition presents:
    - most of the first editions of Kafka's works
    - letters, diaries, manuscripts, photographs and drawings never before displayed in Prague
    3-D installations
    - five audiovisual pieces and a soundtrack specially created for the exhibition

    * No photography
    * Suggested length of visit: 1-1.5 hours
    * modern and cosy cafe just next door
    * museum shop is opposited of the exhibition building

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  • ophiro's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka's house

    by ophiro Updated Aug 22, 2005

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    Franz Kafka was a famous writer , he was a jew.
    This was the house he lived for a few yeras.
    This house is very close to the old town square and you can see the front of the building , very beautiful.

    Franz Kafka's house

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  • ExGuyParis's Profile Photo

    My favorite adjective: "Kafkaesque"

    by ExGuyParis Updated Jul 10, 2005

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    One of Prague's famous citizens, noted author, and the source of my favorite adjective is Franz Kafka.

    Kafkaesque:

    1. Of or relating to Franz Kafka or his writings. 2. Marked by surreal distortion and often a sense of impending danger: “Kafkaesque fantasies of the impassive interrogation, the false trial, the confiscated passport . . . haunt his innocence.” (New Yorker).
    --The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000

    Prague is a Kafkaesque city. You can visit a number of houses that Franz Kafka lived in.

    Watch out for cockroaches.

    Kafka is burried in the New Jewish Cemetery.

    Did Kafka  consider himself Kafkaesque?
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  • iwys's Profile Photo

    Minute House

    by iwys Written Dec 12, 2004

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    The Minute House, or Dum u Minuty, was the childhood home of Franz Kafka. It was built in 1611 and has Renaissance, black and white, sgraffito walls. Kafka lived here from 1889 to 1896.

    The name comes from the time when the house was used as a tobacconist's shop and you could try a small cigarette, which lasted one minute.

    Minute House
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  • ceswho's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka Monument

    by ceswho Updated Aug 18, 2004

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    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), the author of two of the most influential novels of the 20th century, the Trial and The Castle, Kafka spent most of his short life at the Old town. From 1893-1901 he studied in the Golz-Kinsky Palace where his father later has a shop. He worked as an insurance clerk, but frequented a literary salon in At the Golden Unicorn on Old Town Square, along with others who wrote in Geman. Hardly any of his work was published in his lifetime.

    Franz Kafka Monument

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  • Flamegirl's Profile Photo

    Kafka statue

    by Flamegirl Updated Jun 10, 2004

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    This statue is inspired by the works of Franz Kafka, one of Prague's most famous residents. If you look at the ground you might make out the legs of an insect, which recalls his short story "Die Verwandlung", and I believe the man sitting on a faceless body represents the struggle with bureaucracy.

    Kafka Statue, Prague

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka in the Golden Lane

    by globetrott Written Sep 5, 2003

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    In house Nr. 22 Franz Kafka lived for a short period and also wrote parts of his works.
    A small inscription on the right shows his name.

    You may walk the Golden Lane freely and without entrance fee after 04.00 p.m., BUT all the shops will be closed then, and so you may see the buildings only from outside.

    On the other hand, you are able to take pics with an almost empty street.

    Kafka's house in the Golden Lane in Prague
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  • coceng's Profile Photo

    My Proof Of Being...

    by coceng Updated Aug 28, 2003

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    This is a good proof to be in Prague ! The sign of Franz Kafka's house.

    Franz Kafka was Czech born German speaking poet, writer who expressed the Alienation of a 20th Century Man in his novels.

    Too arty-farty for me but everybody sems to know the name but nothing about his life or especially his writings !

    I saw this sign on Golden Lane
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