Franz Kafka's Prague, Prague

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  • Franz Kafka Museum in Prague
    Franz Kafka Museum in Prague
    by Jefie
  • Statue in front of the Kafka Museum
    Statue in front of the Kafka Museum
    by Jefie
  • Inside the eerie Franz Kafka Museum
    Inside the eerie Franz Kafka Museum
    by Jefie
  • rexvaughan's Profile Photo

    The City of Kafka

    by rexvaughan Updated Nov 28, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kafka is certainly one of Prague?s more famous sons, so it seemed appropriate that there is a museum dedicated to his life and work focused on Prague. As Kafka is a variation from the norm, so is the museum. For starters there is the unusual rotating statue urinating in a pool in front of the entrance. The inside is divided into two sections, ?Existential Space? and ?Imaginary Topography.? The museum has an impressive colledction of his drawings, photographs, manuscripts, letters, and diaries as well as first editions of all Kafka?s works. There are also 3-D installations and audiovisuals with soundtrack created for this exhibit. It is one of the more creative museums I have seen as it does seem to give you some of the ?existential? feel for Kafka and his city. There are lots of things related to Kafka in Prague, including his home and the building where his father?s clothing business was located. I recommend this museum to give you good intro to his life.

    Open daily 10:00-18:00. Admission 240 Kc

    Museum entrance No comment
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  • iwys's Profile Photo

    Minute House

    by iwys Written Dec 12, 2004

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    The Minute House, or Dum u Minuty, was the childhood home of Franz Kafka. It was built in 1611 and has Renaissance, black and white, sgraffito walls. Kafka lived here from 1889 to 1896.

    The name comes from the time when the house was used as a tobacconist's shop and you could try a small cigarette, which lasted one minute.

    Minute House
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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka Statue

    by nicolaitan Written Oct 7, 2006

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    Located immediately next to the Spanish Synagogue, this statue was unveiled in December 2003, the work of sculptor Jaroslav Rona. It is based on an early work describing one man walking through the streets of Prague on the shoulders of another. In this statue, the upper figure is Kafka himself with his trademark Homburg hat. The figure below has, obviously, no head and perhaps is a suit without a body - meant to charactize the beaurocracy Kafka disliked so much.

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  • chbuchie's Profile Photo

    Kafkacity

    by chbuchie Updated Nov 16, 2005

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    Not only in the library and bookshops but also all around Prague will you find trailmarks of one of the biggest writer of the past century

    Next to one of the synagogues in the Jewish quarter a large statue of Franz was erect , depicting one of his characters.
    In the beginning of the Golden Lane you'll find the house of Kafka, well actually he just stayed a few months here with his sister, but it sells
    The house is installed like a museum, with artefacts, costumes and weapons of the middle-ages. In the back end you can even shoot some crossbow.

    Frans Kafka was a Czech-born German-speaking writer who only became famous posthumously with his novels expressing the alienation of 20th century man, more precisely dehumanization, bureaucratic labyrinths, and totalitarian society . Kafkaesque characters are trademarks of his writing. His health issues added other issues like fear of physical and mental collapse in his stories.
    Kafka admitted in Letter to His Father (1919) : "My writing was all about you; all I did there, after all, was to bemoan what I could not bemoan upon your breast. It was an intentionally long-drawn-out leave-taking from you."
    The Castle and The Trial ( or lack of trial as he describes so well) remain his 2 most famous novels.
    In 1924 Kafka died of TBC.

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  • Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

    Monument to Franz Kafka

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Dec 17, 2006

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    Between the Churhc of Saint Spirit and the Spanish Synagogue there is the monument to Franz Kafka one of the most important Czech writers. In my opinion the monument should be represent the Invisible Man.

    Monument to Franz Kafka
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  • ceswho's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka Monument

    by ceswho Updated Aug 18, 2004

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    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), the author of two of the most influential novels of the 20th century, the Trial and The Castle, Kafka spent most of his short life at the Old town. From 1893-1901 he studied in the Golz-Kinsky Palace where his father later has a shop. He worked as an insurance clerk, but frequented a literary salon in At the Golden Unicorn on Old Town Square, along with others who wrote in Geman. Hardly any of his work was published in his lifetime.

    Franz Kafka Monument

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka Museum

    by Nemorino Written Jun 3, 2011

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    This unusual and wonderfully creative museum consists of a long-term exhibition called "The City of K., Franz Kafka and Prague", which originated in another city entirely, namely Barcelona, where it opened in 1999. Numerous people from Barcelona were involved in creating the exhibition, which seems to have benefited enormously from their insights and fresh input.

    After Barcelona, the exhibition was moved to the Jewish Museum in New York, where it was shown in 2002-2003. Then in 2005 it was finally installed in Prague, the city where Franz Kafka was born in 1883 and where he lived, worked and wrote for most of his life.

    For me this museum was a series of memory jogs, since I read most of Kafka's books and stories nearly half a century ago.

    One of the things I learned at the museum was that Kafka's day job was not nearly as senseless as he made it out to be. Kafka claimed to hate his office job, and in his stories he often wrote about people who were helplessly caught in the web of a mindless bureaucracy, in situations that are now often described as "Kafkaesque".

    But at another level Kafka was a diligent employee who was rightfully proud of his accomplishments at the Worker's Accident Insurance Institute, where he worked for many years in a department devoted to preventing industrial accidents. He wrote the department's annual reports on factory safety, and was even promoted to department head shortly before he had to resign because of illness.

    My personal connection to this is that my Canadian/American grandfather, who was only five years younger than Kafka, was the managing director of the National Safety Council in the United States from 1913 to 1942, so he was very much involved in industrial accident prevention throughout his working life. (But otherwise my grandfather was a very different sort of person who never even read any of Kafka's books as far as I know.)

    (Yes, this is the same grandfather who was booked on the maiden voyage of the Titanic in 1912, but changed his booking at short notice for business reasons. No doubt his narrow escape from the sinking of the Titanic reinforced his life-long interest in safety and accident prevention.)

    Second photo: A poster at the entrance to the Franz Kafka Museum at the Herget Brickworks.

    Third photo: Ticket to the Franz Kafka Museum.

    1. Entrance to the Franz Kafka Museum 2. Poster at the Franz Kafka Museum 3. Ticket to the Franz Kafka Museum
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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka in the Golden Lane

    by globetrott Written Sep 5, 2003

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    In house Nr. 22 Franz Kafka lived for a short period and also wrote parts of his works.
    A small inscription on the right shows his name.

    You may walk the Golden Lane freely and without entrance fee after 04.00 p.m., BUT all the shops will be closed then, and so you may see the buildings only from outside.

    On the other hand, you are able to take pics with an almost empty street.

    Kafka's house in the Golden Lane in Prague
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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    House "U minuti"

    by Raimix Updated Jan 31, 2010

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    Minute house (U minuti) is one of Renaissance buildings here, well preserved example. The façade is full of sgraffito decorations that present such famous Habsburg family personalities as Philip II of Spain, Rudolph II, Maxmilian II. House was built as gothic in 15th century, later reconstructed (16th century) into Renaissance forms.

    House is famous for one of its former resident – Franc Kafka. He lived here from 1889 – 1896.

    This popular tourist spot has interesting name “Minute house”. It is actually nothing associated with short time. Actually it came from words “at the diminutive”, as tobacco at this house was sold at very little pieces.

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Statue of Franz Kafka

    by Raimix Updated Jan 31, 2010

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    Franz Kafka depicted here as riding on the shoulders of headless man. Actually it is based on Franz Kafka story, named “Description of a Struggle” where young mane rides on another man through streets of Prague.
    The statue stands here from 2003, author – David Vavra. I think is good idea to show writer acting in his own written scene.

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  • Flamegirl's Profile Photo

    Kafka statue

    by Flamegirl Updated Jun 10, 2004

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    This statue is inspired by the works of Franz Kafka, one of Prague's most famous residents. If you look at the ground you might make out the legs of an insect, which recalls his short story "Die Verwandlung", and I believe the man sitting on a faceless body represents the struggle with bureaucracy.

    Kafka Statue, Prague

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Golz - Kinsky palace

    by Raimix Updated Jan 31, 2010

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    Kilian Ignaz Ditezenhofer designed this palace in rococo style. Palace looks quite solid and colorful comparing it to other buildings around old town square. Later, family of Golz sold it to Kinskies in 1768. It was used by communist leader Klement Gottwald to gather party members here. Kafka’s father had a shop there and nowadays it serves a place for art exhibitions.

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  • Imbi's Profile Photo

    Franz Kafka Exposition

    by Imbi Written Jan 4, 2003

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    Pragues most famous citizen was born here in 1883. Kafkas short life was almost entirely spent in the Old Town, and his novels and stories - although never referring to the city by name - are steeped in its atmosphere.
    The exhibition consists of texts and photographs based on the authors life. A small gift shop specializes in Kafka-related items.
    Admission: 20 Kc

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  • ExGuyParis's Profile Photo

    My favorite adjective: "Kafkaesque"

    by ExGuyParis Updated Jul 10, 2005

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    One of Prague's famous citizens, noted author, and the source of my favorite adjective is Franz Kafka.

    Kafkaesque:

    1. Of or relating to Franz Kafka or his writings. 2. Marked by surreal distortion and often a sense of impending danger: “Kafkaesque fantasies of the impassive interrogation, the false trial, the confiscated passport . . . haunt his innocence.” (New Yorker).
    --The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000

    Prague is a Kafkaesque city. You can visit a number of houses that Franz Kafka lived in.

    Watch out for cockroaches.

    Kafka is burried in the New Jewish Cemetery.

    Did Kafka  consider himself Kafkaesque?
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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    kafka museum

    by doug48 Written Jun 21, 2008

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    the kafka museum has collections on the life and works of franz kafka. franz kafka (1883-1924) is prague's most famous writer. kafka's most famous work was the "trial". a must see site for those interested in franz kafka.

    kafka museum
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