Jewish Museum, Prague

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  • Ceremonial Hall of the Old Jewish Cemetery
    Ceremonial Hall of the Old Jewish...
    by Jefie
  • Maisel Synagogue in Prague's Jewish Quarter
    Maisel Synagogue in Prague's Jewish...
    by Jefie
  • Spanish Synagogue I PRague
    Spanish Synagogue I PRague
    by Jefie
  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Prague's Jewish Quarter and historic synagogues

    by Jefie Updated Mar 15, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Maisel Synagogue in Prague's Jewish Quarter
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    When we got to Prague, we had already walked through the Jewish quarters in Budapest and Vienna so we were expecting to see something somewhat similar - i.e., not exactly worth the detour, except for the High Synagogue in Budapest - but we couldn't have been more wrong! Prague's Jewish Museum turned out to be one of my favourite attractions in the city. The museum was established in 1906 in an effort to preserve what was left of the old Jewish ghetto from destruction. The museum includes six synagogues and the Old Jewish Cemetery. Each synagogue features a special exhibition that gives amazing insight into the history, culture and traditions of Jews in Prague and abroad. Pinkas Synagogue houses a memorial to victims of the Holocaust, and I thought the pictures drawn by Jewish children while they were imprisoned in Nazi camps were especially moving. Tickets cost 300 CZK and give access to the old cemetery, the Old-New Synagogue, High Synagogue, Klausen Synagogue, Maisel Synagogue and Pinkas Synagogue. It's truly worth every penny!

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • tweetycaro's Profile Photo

    The Jewish Museum in Prague

    by tweetycaro Written Oct 5, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    I really wanted to see the Old Jewish Cemetry. With the ticket you can also get in The Maisel Synagogue, The Spanish Synagogue, The Pinkas Synagogue, The Klausen Synagogue and Ceremonial Hall.

    I was really impressed by the Pinkas Synagogue, After the second world war, the synagogue was turned into a memorial to the jews of bohemia and moravia murdered by the nazis. On its walls are inscribed the names of the jewish victims, their personal data, and the names of the communities to which they belonged. In 1968, however the memorial had to be closed because ground water had penetrated the building's foundations, thus endagering the structure. Finally, in 1992-1996, the 80000 names of the bohemian and moravian jewish victims were rewritten on its walls.

    But what was really amazing was the jewish cemetry. It was established in the first half of the 15th century. Along with th old new synagogue it is one of the most important surviving monuments in Prague's jewish town. The oldest tombstone, which marks the grave of the poet and scholar Avigdor Kara, dates from the year 1439. Burials took place in the cemetery until 1787. Today the cemetery contains almost 12000 tombstones, although the number of persons buried there is much greater. It is assumed that the cemetery contains several burial layers imposed one on top of the other. The picturesque groups of tombstones from various periods result from the fact that older stones were lifted up from the lower layers.

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  • Ericasmurf99's Profile Photo

    Jewish Synagogue & Museum

    by Ericasmurf99 Updated Aug 24, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jewish Synagogue & Museum
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    The walls inside are lined with the names of all the Jewish people that were killed in Prague during the halocaust. There are over 50,000!

    You can also see many other things. Such as the yellow hats that Jewish people were forced to wear if they left the Jewish section. This is so others would know they were Jewish.

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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  • tomruth78's Profile Photo

    The Jewish Museum in Prague

    by tomruth78 Written Mar 27, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Map of the Jewish Quarter
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    Costs 300kc to visit the Maisel Synagogue, the Spanish Synagogue, the Pinkas Synagogue, the Old Jewish Cemetary, the Klaus Synagogue and the Ceremonial Hall. For 500kc you can add the Old New Synagogue into the package.

    We decided not to go with the more expensive package as we already felt it was over priced in comparison to other museums.

    The place is full of school trips, if when you arrive there are lots of people around, take a walk around and come back ten minutes later, it will be less busy and you will be able to enjoy your visit rather than have ignorant school children pushing you around.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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  • monica78's Profile Photo

    Jewish museum

    by monica78 Written Sep 7, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Here is a group of buildings which is not destroied after the Jewish ghetto. They also survived the nazi occupation. Hitler was planning to builde a museum here for the eliminated race. So some of the material was collected of the nazists.

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  • Imbi's Profile Photo

    JEWISH MUSEUM

    by Imbi Written Sep 4, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    ). One ticket covers all six components of the Jewish Museum, in the former Prague ghetto, Josefov: the Klausen, Maisel, Pinkas and Spanish synagogues, the Old Jewish Cemetery and the Ceremonial Hall. The recently restored walls of the Pinkas synagogue list the names and home towns of 77,297 Jews killed in the Holocaust; in the hall is a display of children's drawings from the Terezín ghetto and concentration camp in West Bohemia. The cramped, jumbled gravestones of the medieval cemetery (Jews were not allowed to be buried anywhere else) reflect living conditions inside the old walled ghetto, which was first cleared out in the early 20th century under the Hapsburgs. The museum was established in 1906 to preserve the remains of this massive clearance project; but it is former Nazi plunder that did the most to expand its collection (Hitler, it seems, intended to establish a 'museum of an extinct race'). Admission 290Kc. Open 9am-6pm Apr-Oct; 9am-4.30pm Nov-Mar; closed Sat and Jewish holidays.

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  • kenbac's Profile Photo

    The Jewish Museum.

    by kenbac Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This consists of five Synagogues and the Old jewish cemetery, detailing Jewish life in Prague. It covers in great detail the practice and traditions of the Jewish People. Their history in Prague, through the ages right up to their attempted but rejected efforts at assimilation. Then on of course to the occupation by the Germans and the murder of 72,000 Jewish people living in Prague

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