Fun things to do in Prague

  • Church of St. Nicholas in Lesser Town
    Church of St. Nicholas in Lesser Town
    by Jefie
  • View of Old Town from Charles Bridge
    View of Old Town from Charles Bridge
    by Jefie
  • The Old Royal Palace
    The Old Royal Palace
    by Xeriss

Most Viewed Things to Do in Prague

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    CHURCH OF ST. JAMES

    by balhannah Updated Dec 21, 2014

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    The Roman Catholic Church of St James, is situated in a little street behind the Ungelt Courtyard, and is attached to an important Franciscan monastic community. I wonder how many people find it!

    Some of the Church was destroyed by fire in 1689, this led to a new façade which included three wonderful large stucco reliefs over the portals, featuring St Francis of Assisi, St James and St Anthony of Padua. The Church doors have some lovely carvings and are worth a look!
    The Church is big and has a beautiful baroque interior. The vault is covered with trompe-l’oeil paintings.

    This Church has some historic events to its name, such as the coronation feast for the royal couple, John of Bohemia (John the Blind) and Elisabeth of Bohemia in 1311.
    It was also used for royal funeral ceremonies. It was here where the body of Charles IV was shown lying in state surrounded by five hundred candles, then in 1577, Emperor Maxmilian II was temporarily interred here.

    There are some really interesting stories about this Church.

    The first is about the mummified human hand hanging on the wall. It's believed to belong to a thief who tried to steal the jewels of the Madonna. The Madonna supposedly caught him by the arm stopping the thief from getting away. The next morning, when the Minorites came to the Church, they saw the thief and tried to release him and couldn't, so they cut his arm and then the Madonna let the hand go. The monks hung the arm to remember this event and as a warning for other thieves.

    Another is about the tomb of Count Vratislav of Mitrovice. After Count Vratislav was buried, people could hear sounds coming from the Tomb. What on earth was it? Holy water was sprinkled onto the Tomb, just incase the Count wasn't at peace! Several years later, the Tomb was opened, only to find the coffin damaged and the remains of the count outside the coffin. He was buried alive and when he woke up from his deep unconsciousness, he tried to alert the people in the church. Not one person thought to open the Tomb to see what the noise was! What a terrible way to die!

    Another sad event was during the plague when the Main Altar was being painted. Most had died of the plague, but not the painter. He finished the painting only to become ill that day and died by the evening.

    After St Vitus Cathedral, St James is the second largest church in Prague. You can come here look, to pray or enjoy one of the many concerts held there.
    I could only have a look from the door as it was being closed for lunch, hence a blurred photo of the inside. Be aware of this so your not caught!

    OPEN.... every day from 9:30am to 12pm and from 2pm to 4pm.
    Entry not allowed during mass or organ concerts.

    Church of St. James Church of St. James Church of St. James Church of St. James
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Kostel svatého Ignáce z Loyoly

    by GracesTrips Updated Aug 31, 2014

    We came upon this beautiful church as we neared Charles Square, a fairly large area of a park close to the river. The name of the church translates to Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola. Built in 1665-1678. If you are in the area, it is worth a visit. Inside the church is just absolutely beautiful. There is something peaceful when visiting a church even if it is in the middle of a hustling, bustling city.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    Visit Troja Palace-Trojský zámek

    by GracesTrips Updated Aug 31, 2014

    Located in Prague but north of Old Town. It was easy too get to with public transportation. From Old Town Prague we entered the metro station at Mùstek, the B line or Yellow line towards Cerný Most. We exited at Florenc to continue on to the C line or Red line towards Letnany and exiting at the Nádraží Holešovice station. As soon as you exit the station, you can board the bus line # 112. You can exit the bus at the zoo, the castle is just across the street. A 30 minute ticket is all you need for the trek. That will take care of your metro ride, transfers and bus ride. You will buy another 30 minute ticket to get back. Machines are located at the bus stop at the zoo.

    Now, about the castle, built for Counts of Šternberk from 1679 to 1691 but now owned by the City of Prague. The frescos painted on the ceilings and walls are fantastic. There is not much in the way of furniture to be seen. Each room has explanations on paper in various languages. Please see my travelogue for more pics.

    We enjoyed visiting the Palace. The grounds reminded me of Palace of Versailles in a way.

    I couldn't find an official website.

    Open in April - October Tuesday through Sunday from 10am-6pm, except Fridays from 1pm-6pm
    Closed in November - March

    Admission: 120 Kč, reduced 60 Kč

    Sculptures on display created by Bohumil Kafka
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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    Folk dance

    by solopes Updated Jul 30, 2014

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    For more than 30 years that I am a lover of Czech dances.

    I searched everything to find a live performance in Prague, and discovered it in a wine dinner at Holiday Inn hotel.

    Excellent, with an extra bonus In our way out, the snow released the child hidden in most of us.

    Folk Dance - Prague Wine tasting - Prague Snow - Prague
    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting
    • Arts and Culture

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    Staromestske Namesti - houses

    by croisbeauty Updated Jul 1, 2014

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    I remember Prague in the early eighties, it was just as beautiful city as it is today but it looked very shabby and somehow sleepy. The city was milled by people with frown faces, not friendly and they acted scared. In these lead-times only Hradčany were a place where I felt comfortable. All facades on houses around Staromestske Namesti were gray and neglected and the whole square gave impression of decadence.
    There was a so-called "berioska" (duty free shop) in Celetna ulice (just a foot from the main square), luxury goods store in which customers could be only foreigners and diplomats. Two local girls, who were standing near the berioska, asked me to buy them American cigarettes and perfumes. When I was about to enter in the shop the military jeep stopped in front of it and two armed Russian soldiers blocked the entrance. I was arrogantly pushed by them and some Russian army officer entered into the store. All customers, who were already inside of the shop, had to leave. Locals told me it is a usual behavior of the Russian army officers who, at that time, have been stationed in Prague. I felt very bad, seeing such an episode, can only imagine how bad felt the citizens of Prague.

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  • The Lobkowicz Palace in Prague Castle

    by Koliasova Written Jan 20, 2014

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    Do not miss The Lobkowicz Palace, very interesting and the oldest art collection in Czech republic.

    Free audioguides are narrated by family members you will enjoy very nice personal story about czech and lobkowicz family history.

    In the collection are fantastic paintings by P. Breughel, D.Velasquez, A. Canaletto.

    The Lobkowicz family loved music, so as well original scores by Mozart and Beethoven can be seen in the Museum. Tour takes aprox. 1 hour.

    As well very nice is to rest after the tour in The Lobkowicz Caffe

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits

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    Herget cihelna - Herget brickyard

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 31, 2013

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    Herget brickyard in Cihelna street is location where sculpture of "Peeing Figures" can be found. I noticed it only by chance in a night strolling on a first day I came to Prague. The sculpture consists of two masculine bronze figures, each one 210cm high, standing in a basin which is in a shape of Czech. The figures contain an electronic device enabling them to turn their hips and lift their penises in such a way that the stream of water writes letters on the surface. The GSM unit inside receives SMS messages , sent to the number written nearby.
    The bronze sculpture, unveiled in 2004, is work of controversial and world wide famous Czech sculptor David Černy.
    Hergetova cihelna is home of Franz Kafka museum. Museum's designers exposed exhibits which can evoke Kafka's darkly paranoid and paradoxical work. Museum's basement is not a place for young children but must be fascinating to anyone familiar with Kafka's work.

    Peeing Figures Peeing Figures Peeing Figures

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    St. Thomas K

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 31, 2013

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    Kostel svateho Tomase (Church of St. Thomas K.) is located in Josefska street and is partly overlooking Malomestske namesti. This originally Gothic church was founded for the Order of the Augustinian Hermits by Wenceslas II in 1285 and completed in 1379, along with an monastery and St. Thomas' brewery. Later on, in 1604, the church was remodeled in Baroque style.
    In a richly decorated interior are paintings and statues and in particularly beautiful ceiling frescoes by famous Baroque painter Vaclav Vavrinec Reiner. Those who are beer lovers wont miss to visit St. Thoams's brewery, adjacent to the monastery, and taste beer made by Augustinian friars.
    St. Thomas is one of the Prague churches where masses and divine services are practicing in English language.

    Kostel svateho Tomase Kostel svateho Tomase the Augustinian monastery

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    Smetanovo nabreži - Krannerova kašna

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 30, 2013

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    Ktannerova kašna (Kranner's Fountain) is a neo-Gothic monument on the Smenata enbankment designed by the architect Josef Kranner, and the allegorical sculptures were made by Josef Max.
    The fountain has a shape of an polygonal tank with pillars supporting the allegorical sculptures of sixteen Czech regions. The allegorical figure of Prague stands in fron of them, facing the river. Higher up there are allegorical statues representing science, art, peace, plenty, tillage, mining, industry and trade. Inside the monument is a 29m high pinnacle, inside of which is a cast statue of Emperor Josef I mounted in horseback.
    The statue of Josef I was installed in 1848, but soon the statue became quite unpopular with the locals, and when Czechoslovakia declared independence on the Austro-Hungarian Empire, in 1918, it was removed.

    Kranner's Fountain the statue of Josef I Kranner's Fountain Kranner's Fountain Kranner's Fountain

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    Staromestske Namesti - houses

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 27, 2013

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    U kamenneho zvonu (at the stone bell) is a monumental tower-shaped palace with an exceptionally well preserved Gothic facade. It is possible that the later Emperor Charles IV lived in this house. According to the recent researches the house dates back from the 13th century, the oldest phase is preserved in the cellars and the ground floor. The name of the house "At the Stone Bell" first appears in 1417 thanks to the stone bell which was preserved at the corner of the house. Today is serve as an exhibition space and concert hall.
    Tynska škola (Tyn school) has very long tradition. The existence of the Latin school by the Church of Our Lady before Tyn was recorded in the 13th century. This building features the oldest Gothic archway in whole of Prague. In the central position of the front facade is the 18th century fresco depicting Assumption of Mary....

    Tyn school U kamenneho zvonu

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    Celetna street

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 27, 2013

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    Celetna connecting the Old Town Square with the Powder Gate. It is one of the oldest streets in Prague and was a part of the so-called Royal Route of the coronation parade in the 14th century.
    The street is named after bread that was baked in the area during the Middle Ages. From the medieval times onwards, the houses in Celetna have been remodeled from Gothic to Baroque and then to Classical architecture styles. A few buildings, however, still have Romanesque and Gothic foundations.
    The House of the Black Madonna, designed in 1911-1912 by Josef Gočar, is home of the Museum of Cubism. It was the first example of cubist architecture in Prague. The stone sculpture of Black Madonna, that originally adorned Baroque building on the same site, is located at the corner of the building.

    Celetna street Black Madonna Celetna street, 36 Celetna street Celetna ulice

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    Križovnicke namesti

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 25, 2013

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    Križovnicke namesti (Square of the Knights of the Cross) is a small square but rich with a number of a very important sights. The name of the square derives from the name of the religious order called, The Order of the Knights of the Cross with the Red Star, which was founded in 1233. The order maintained the Judith Bridge (predecessor of Charles Bridge) and collected customs and usage charges. But their main activities were caritable, to take care of ill and poor people. That is why their church and adjacent monastery was one of the few not to be destroyed by the Hussites in the 15th century. The Hussites appreciated their helpfulness in the local society.
    The gallery of the Order is situated in the former hospital, as well as the general's seat of the order. The gallery houses a collection of excellent specimens of European goldsmithery from the late Gothic era to the 20th century.
    The present day square originated from 1847 after the demolition of a vintner's lodge, and a monument honoring Charles IV was erected at that time too.

    Kri?ovnicke namesti Kri?ovnicke namesti The gallery of the Order Monument to Charles IV

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    Kostel sv Františka Serafinskeho

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 25, 2013

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    The Order of the Knights of the Cross with the Red Star was founded by St. Agnes of Bohemia in 1233. They built a Gothic church, a monastery and a hospital by the Judith Bridge, the predecessor of the present Charles Bridge. Remains of the original Gothic church are preserved in the underground chapel (Podzemni kaple).
    The present church, from 1688, was built as a centered building with a huge cupola. It is work of a French architect Jean Baptiste Mathey, who was obviously inspired by the church of St. Peter in Rome. In the alcoves of the front facade there are statues representing patron saints of Bohemia. It's plan of the presbytery's floor is shaped as a small cross, whilst the squared nave and chapel are set out shaped like a big cross.
    The rich interior decoration dominate by a fresco "The Last Judgement" by the famous Prague Baroque painter Vaclav Vavrinec Reiner. The church houses the second oldest organ in Prague, played by Mozart, Dvorak and other prominent musical personalities. This church have a very long tradition of organ concerts.

    kostel sv Franti��ka Serafinskeho announcers of the concert in the church Cupola of St. Francis Church

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    Klementinum

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 25, 2013

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    Klementinum or Clementinum is large complex of buildings situated next to the Charles Bridge. Its name comes from a chapel dedicated to Saint Clement in the 11th century. In the medieval period a Dominican Monastery was founded adjacent to the chapel, but in 1556 it was transformed to a Jesuit College. In 1622 the Jesuits transferred the library of Charles University to the Klementinum. The Jesuits remained until 1773, when the Klementinum was established as an observatory, library and university by the Empress Maria Theresa of Austria. Since 1781 the Klementinum is the National Library.
    The complex of the Klementinum is a notable example of Baroque architecture, covering 20,000 square meters. It was known as the third largest Jesuit college in the world. The Baroque Library Hall inside the Klementinum is known for its beautiful interior and ceiling artwork by Jan Hiebl.

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    Kostel sv. Voršily

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 24, 2013

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    Kostel sv. Voršily (the church of St. Ursula) is part of a convent of the Ursulines. It is a fine example of high-Baroque architecture constructed from 1699 to 1704 by architect Marco Antonio Canevalle. The single naved interior is richly decorated.
    The marvel of St. Ursula is the survival of the exterior statuary. The original statues still decorate the facade. The statues are work of Ignaz Platzer the Elder.
    Close by the church the 1989 Velvet Revolution began where crowds of students marched from the river towards Wenceslas Square to find their way blocked by Communist riot police.

    Kostel sv. Vor��ily Kostel sv. Vor��ily Kostel sv. Vor��ily

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