Petrin, Prague

4.5 out of 5 stars 82 Reviews

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  • View from Petrin Park
    View from Petrin Park
    by Xeriss
  • View from the track
    View from the track
    by balhannah
  • Hall Of Mirrors
    Hall Of Mirrors
    by balhannah
  • jankonas's Profile Photo

    One of the best view on Prague

    by jankonas Written Feb 26, 2014

    Spend one day when the sun shines down walking up the park to Strahov. On the top of the hill is small local brewery where you can refresh in czech way. The best time is spring and summer when flowers are all over the park. It's worth it going there!

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    The Maze

    by kris-t Written Sep 29, 2013

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    This small charming building on the Petrin Hill a few steps from the Petrin Tower has couple of rooms with mirrors in it and everyone and each of them makes you look different. It is good attraction for children.

    Also The Mazy has the very famous panoramic picture, showing the battle of Prague's citizens with Swedish army at Charles bridge in 1648.

    Opening hours:
    October, March Mon - Sun 10.00 a.m. - 8.00 p.m.
    November - February Mon - Sun 10.00 a.m. - 6.00 p.m.
    April - September Mon - Sun 10.00 a.m. - 10.00 p.m.

    Admission Fee:
    70 CZK for adults and 30 CZK for children

    The Maze The Maze
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    Stefanik's Observatory

    by kris-t Updated Sep 25, 2013

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    It is an observatory on Petrin hill founded 1928 and named after Slovak astronomer Milan Stefanik (1880-1919).

    The observatory has three domes (Western, Main and Eastern) and one observation lodge. It has Cassegrain mirror telescope with the main mirror of 370 mm and magnification power for observation approx. 80 to 330 times.

    Observatory specializes above all in popularization of astronomy and related natural sciences. Also observatory offers a modern permanent astronomical exhibition reviewing the basics of astronomy.

    Admision:
    Basic entrance fee (with programme) 65 CZK
    Basic entrance fee (without programme) 55 CZK

    Stefaniks Observatory Stefaniks Observatory Stefaniks Observatory
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    WALKING PETRIN HILL

    by balhannah Written Sep 6, 2013

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    Petrin Hill we decided was worth the best part of a day. This hill was where King Charles IV had his vineyards and fruit trees, some are still there today. A lot of the hill is still wooded.

    As I like to have a good look at the sights, walking is the best way to go. Being older, we took the funicular to the top, and then walked everywhere else, making our next stop a garden seat for a rest and then onto Strahov Monastery.

    Petrin Hill covers a large area, so make sure you have good walking shoes on and a bottle of water.
    The walking was along a wide bitumized track with steps to negotiate. I think people with bad knees could manage this type of step. The walk has plenty of interest, including passing by the 14 "Stations of the Cross." Quite a bit of the walk was under Trees, then we came out into full sunshine which was quite hot, so I suggest, on a sunny day, a hat is a good idea too!
    If your feeling tired, do like I did, and take a rest a one of the many garden seats where there is a wonderful view. The views are fabulous and I found myself stopping often for photo's.
    Don't worry about getting lost, there are plenty of information boards with maps along the way.

    PetrinHill is busiest on May 1st, when lovers go and kiss under cherry trees to seal their romance forever.

    View from the track Petrin Hill map Steps along the track View from track of Strahov Monastery View from track
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    HALL OF MIRRORS

    by balhannah Written Sep 6, 2013

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    It was quite a surprise coming across a building on Petrin Hill that looked a little like a Castle, but was in-fact, a Hall of Mirrors!
    Of no interest to my husband or I, we have been through these things in our younger years!
    The Hall of Mirrors building, a replica of the former Vysehrad gate which had 9 small towers, was used during the Prague Jubilee Exhibition in 1891.
    I imagine children would enjoy this place, especially the weirdly shaped mirrors!

    OPEN...
    October, March Mon - Sun 10.00 a.m. - 8.00 p.m.
    November - February Mon - Sun 10.00 a.m. - 6.00 p.m.
    April - September Mon - Sun 10.00 a.m. - 10.00 p.m.

    ADMISSION...70 CZK for adults and 30 CZK for children

    Hall Of Mirrors
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    CALVARY CHAPEL'S

    by balhannah Updated Sep 6, 2013

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    Near St. Lawrence Cathedral are a couple of small Calvary Chapel's. My first photo is of the chapel of the Holy Rood, a baroque building from the years 1735-1737. The front of the Chapel is decorated with sgraffito - "Ressurection of Christ."

    The other Chapel is of the Sepulchre of Christ, built in oriental style. It's a copy of the real grave in Jerusalem.

    Calvary Chapel Calvary Chapel
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    THE ROSE GARDEN

    by balhannah Updated Sep 5, 2013

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    Alighting from the Funicular on Petrin Hill, I walked past the sculpture "The Kiss" by Joseph Maøatka in 1921, had a look at the Observatory and then headed to the Rose Garden.
    Being a keen gardener, I was hoping to see a lovely Rose Garden, unfortunately, I was here at the wrong time of the year, still, this area was very nice. I could imagine 8000 Rose's in bloom, what a picture that would be!

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    CATHEDRAL OF ST. LAWRENCE

    by balhannah Written Sep 5, 2013

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    The Cathedral of Saint Lawrence is located on Petrin Hill in Lesser Town. I was disappointed that the doors were closed!
    In 1745, the Cathedral was re-built in baroque style. It is now painted a pastel colour and has three towers with onion domes which I think make it attractive. The oldest written information of Saint Lawrence dates back to 1135. At that time, it was a wooden Church, then later a Romanesque building, even today parts of the walls of the Romanesque building have been preserved. .

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    THE HUNGER WALL

    by balhannah Written Sep 4, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Heading up to the top of Petrin Hill by Funicular, we passed through a very thick wall. At the top, we could see this was a medeival defense wall, built to protect Prague Castle and Lesser Town.
    Emperor Charles IV ordered the wall to be built, and so it was, between the years 1360-1362. At 4.5metres high, nearly 2 metres thick and with 8 Bastions, one which is used in the main dome of Stefanik Observatory, I think the enemy may have thought twice about attempting an attack!

    What I found interesting about this wall, was its name - Hladová zeï (The Hunger Wall)
    It also has been known as Jagged wall, Zubatá (with teeth) and Chlebová (bread like).
    At this time, Prague was in the midst of a terrible famine. In a way, it was a savior for the poor, for those working on the wall were given food for themselves and their families. It is written that the Emperor, Charles IV worked on the wall several hours every day "to help his beloved people".

    Hunger Wall Hunger Wall
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    STEFANIK OBSERVATORY

    by balhannah Written Sep 4, 2013

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    It didn't take long to reach the top of Petrin Hill on the Funicular. Quiet and peaceful, it was hard to believe that many people were executed on this hill in the olden days.
    There was quite a large Observatory that's been here since 1928. It's named after Slovak astronomer "Milan Rastislav Štefánik," and was built to make astronomy popular among the public.
    Your able to come here and observe the sun, and at night, the moon and other planets.

    CLOSED ON MONDAYS OPEN THE REST OF THE WEEK
    Nov.-Feb. 6PM - 10PM
    Mar.,Oct. 7PM - 9PM
    Apr.-Sep. 2PM - 11PM
    Sat,Sun 10-12, 2-7PM , 9-11PM

    ADMISSION FEE.....40 CZK

    Stefanik Observatory
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    Church of St Michael Archangel in Petrin Park

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Jun 12, 2013

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    The Carpathian Church of St. Michael Archangel is located towards the base of Petrin Hill, close to the Hunger Wall, and is probably one of the least touristed attractions in this part of Prague (what a bonus!).

    It is a wonderful structure that was built in the 18th century in Medvedovce (then part of the First Czechoslovak Republic and is now in the Ukraine) and relocated to Prague in 1929. It is currently used as the parish church of a Romanian Orthodox community (which I imagine is a fairly small subset) and was unfortunately locked when we visited.

    The church is made entirely of wood, from the roof shingles to the nails which hold it together, and the workmanship is superb. Like many orthodox churches, it is surprisingly small, and positively tiny by comparison with the hulking Baroque proportions of many of Prague's other churches. Although it isn't far from the edge of the park, the surrounding woodland is an effective shield from the outside world, and with a smidgeon of imagination, you could fancy yourself in the Carpathian forest.

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    Wander through the orchards above Mala Strana

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Jun 12, 2013

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    On the north western slope of Petrin Hill there is a steep apple orchard which overlooks the Mala Strana and Hradcany districts. It is a tranquil spot that offers glorious vistas across the city and a welcome breath of fresh air after the often close confines of the city centre. When we visited in late March, there was a promise of spring in the air and the fruit trees were just coming into bud - it must be absolutely stunning in summer and early autumn.

    This is a quiet spot to catch your breath and watch the rest of the world as it goes about its business. Frankly, after a sustained period of touristic 'rubbernecking' to take in the splendour of Prague's architecture, it's quite a relief to have an excuse to look down (rather than up) for a change!

    Orchards on Petrin Hill

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    The Hunger Wall

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Oct 13, 2012

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    Located on Petrin Hill, the Hunger Wall stretches from near the Bridge of Legions to the Strahov Abbey. It was built from 1360 to 1362 by Charles IV to create jobs for the starving townsfolk. The area around the wall is a very nice park today. Near the Hunger Wall you will find Petrin Tower (1891), Kinsky Garden, Strahov Abbey, and the Lobkowicz Gardens.

    There is a funicular that takes you to the top of Petrin Hill near the wall. The lower end is near the south tip of Kampa Island on U Jezd street.

    You can also walk to the top and back which is much more entertaining and enjoyable.

    It is said the wall was constructed as a public works project to provide jobs and food to the poor, hence the name.

    Along the Hunger Wall The Wall Prague from Petrin Prague Castle from Petrin Prague Castle
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  • Xeriss's Profile Photo

    Petrin Park

    by Xeriss Updated Jul 1, 2012

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    This park is one of the largest parks I've ever seen in Europe. You could very easily spend a whole day here. We were there early and we ended up staying there until 5pm. We did not manage to reach the very top of the hill and so we had to climb down because we were too tired. Taking the funicular up to Petrin Hill was a good idea as this saved us an enormous amount of energy, even though we had to wait in line for almost half in hour to get onto the funicular.

    If you have a 3 day metro card, you do not need to pay for the funicular. This is included in the ticket. Getting into Petrin Park is free of charge.

    Finding your way around may be daunting at first if you're not familiar with the place or if you don't have a guide book with a map of the park. However, there are signs all over the park to guide you. There's lots to see and do in the park:

    (1) The Mirror Maze (this was closed when we visited)
    (2) Church of St. Lawrence (closed to the public)
    (3) Stefanik Observatory (from 6pm to 8pm) and costs about 55czk,
    (4) Hunger wall
    (5) Church of St. Michael Archangel
    (6) Petrin Tower (you can access the tower for approximately 100czk)
    (7) Rose Garden

    When you're done viewing the park, you can either take the funicular back down, or you can take one of the interesting trails that lead to the Prague Castle or the Strahov Monastery.

    Petrin Tower Entrance to Petrin Hill View from Petrin Park View from the back of the Strahov Monastery The Hunger Wall
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  • Donkey1966's Profile Photo

    Avoiding the tourist crowds

    by Donkey1966 Written Oct 30, 2011

    My partner John and I were just in Prague, and found the amount of tourists (even in October) to be quite oppressive in the Old Town. We were pleasantly surprised when we visited Petrin Hill and the area at the base of it (Kampa). The amount of tourists was far more manageable, and there were some beautiful cobbled streets lined with various restaurants that offered good food. So if you're wanting to get away from the crowds for a bit, head over to Kampa and enjoy a quieter evening!

    Petrin Hill is also a lovely place to spend a few hours; beautiful paths leading through lovely parkland. The map that you can find at various spots throughout the park is pretty useless, so it would be good to find a more detailed map of the park for your own use. However, even without a detailed map, we enjoyed a stroll through the park, and even managed to find the old Croatian church!

    Strange baby statues on Kampa! Near Kampa (Note: No tourists!!! Except me) Croatian Church on Petrin Hill
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