Pinkas Synagogue, Prague

11 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • pinkas synagogue
    pinkas synagogue
    by doug48
  • Pinkas Synagogue
    by Gili_S
  • Pinkas Synagogue
    by Gili_S
  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Pinkas synagogue

    by Raimix Updated Jan 31, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This Jewish temple was constructed in 1479 b Rabbi Pinkas. He was quite wealthy member of Jewish community. The synagogue is unique as it serves as memorial. The walls of it are decorated by names of Czechoslovak Jewish victims of Terezin concentration camp (around 77 000 names inscribed). The synagogue also has collection of paintings made by children in Terezin concentration camp.

    It is pity that I have seen this place just as outside object, next time I hope to visit synagogue.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Gili_S's Profile Photo

    The Pinkas Synagogue

    by Gili_S Written Nov 1, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    The Pinkas Synagogue is one of the main attractions in the old city. This building about 500 years old is partly a Jewish museum in the memory of the Jewish victims of the Nazis. If you plan to visit here, go early as there is long queue outside.

    Was this review helpful?

  • doug48's Profile Photo

    pinkas synagogue

    by doug48 Written Jun 16, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    pinkas synagogue

    this synagogue was founded in 1479 by rabbi pinkas and was enlarged in 1535 by aaron horowitz. the walls of the synagogue are covered with 77,297 names of victims of the holocaust. this is also the entrance to the old jewish cemetery.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • MLW20's Profile Photo

    Pinkas Synagogue

    by MLW20 Written Oct 30, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    This synagogue is used as a memorial to the Jews that were victims of the Nazis during WWII. The walls are covered by the handwritten names of 77,297 Czech Jews.

    Hometowns are in gold, family names are in red, followed by black for the first name, birthday and last date known to be alive.

    If you go up the steps to the women's gallery you will see names that were from 1959 that got badly damaged by a flood.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Pinkas Synagogue ( 3 photos) = Part 2

    by nicolaitan Updated Oct 4, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    Included in another area are crayon drawings by the children imprisoned in Terezin. This defines heart-rending. The horrible daily events were the lives of these children. One drawing remains in my mind, by a young girl - a man with a yellow star being hanged, watched by men in uniform. One can only speculate on the lives of these children who lived with terror and immenent death every day of their lives, eventually almost all to perish in the gas chambers. Each drawing is with a photograph of the young artist.

    NB - PHOTOGRAPHY IS NOMINALLY FORBIDDEN IN THE JEWISH MUSEUM - BE CIRCUMSPECT, NO FLASH, SHOOT FROM THE HIP.

    Was this review helpful?

  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Pinkas Synagogue ( 4 photos) = part 1.

    by nicolaitan Written Oct 3, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    The third stop on the Jewish Museum tour is the third oldest building in the Jewish Quarter. Originally founded by Rabbi Pinkas in the 11 Century, it was reconstructed by the wealthy Horowitz family beginning in 1535. The Horowitz family lost their influence after supporting the fraudulent Moschiach Shlomo Molko, but the synagogue remained active till the Nazi takeover in 1941. After the war, it was dedicated to the memory of the 80000 Jews from Bohemia and Moravia who perished in the Holocaust, first transferred to Terezin and then on to multiple extermination camps.

    The walls are inscribed with the names of the victims, their towns, and dates of birth and death in 1 cm. letters, filling essentially all the inner walls of the building. As a memorial to those unknown, the names of the camps are written on both sides of the Holy Ark. The Communists whitewashed the walls with the pretense of repairing leaks in the building, but the very first act of Vaclav Havel as president of Czechoslovakia was to commission the rewriting of the names. It took 2 years and the synagogue was again opened in 1996 on Jewish Holocaust Memorial Day. In 2002, a flood obliterated the names which were again rewritten.

    It takes the visitor only a few minutes to see this building, but the memories will last a lifetime. It so completely quantitates the Nazi evil - an unforgettable experience.

    Was this review helpful?

  • lina112's Profile Photo

    The Pinkas Synagogue

    by lina112 Written Aug 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The presente building is the work or the Horowitz family. In 1535 Aaron Meshulam Horowitz had it built between his house and the site of the Old Jewish Cementery. After the Second World War, the synanogue was turned into a Memorial to the Jews of Bohemia and Moravia murdered by the Nazis. On its walls are inscribed the names of the Jewish victims, their personal data, and the names of the comunities to which they belonged.

    El edificio actual es obra de la familia Horowitz. En 1535, lo hizo construir Aaron Meshullam Horowitz entre su casa y el viejo cementerio judio. Después de la segunda guerra mundial, la sinagoga se convirtió en un monumento a los judios de Bohemia y Moravia asesinados por los nazis. En sus paredes están inscritos los nombres de las víctimas judías, sus datos personales, y los nombres de las comunidades a las cuales pertenecieron.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • rexvaughan's Profile Photo

    Pinkas Synagogue

    by rexvaughan Updated Dec 9, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In memorium
    1 more image

    One of the saddest but most moving sights you can see in Prague is at the Pinkas Synagogue. In 1939 there were some 120,000 Jews in the area and only 10,000 of them remained at the time of liberation in 1945. On the walls of this synagogue are inscribed the names of 77,297 Czech Jews who were sent from Prague to the gas chambers. They are organized by home area with the family names in red, hometowns in gold, first names in black. Their date of birth and the last date they were known to be alive is also shown. It is moving to realize how many victims there were in this tragic and horrid atrocity but also to realize the painstaking work that goes into this memorial. Each name is beautifully hand lettered and some have had to be done over due first to the communists erasing them all (they were re-written in 1989. Then flood damage in 2003 required another re-writing.

    Upstairs is an exhibit of children’s art from those who were imprisoned at Terezin and later perished. It too is moving in that the art work poignantly displays the children’s emotions not only of fear and oppression, but also of their love of life their hopes and plans for the future.

    Pictures are understandably not allowed and the ones shown here is from their web site

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • vesna04's Profile Photo

    Pinkas Synagogue

    by vesna04 Written Oct 2, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pinkas Synagogue

    It was my first visit to any synagogue at all. I was shocked. The walls were covered with names of the Jewish victims killed by nazis in WWII. Then I saw the collection of drawings by children held in concetracion camps. Most of them didn't survive. I was deaply tuched...and needed some time to continue my tour.

    Was this review helpful?

  • tomruth78's Profile Photo

    Pinkas Synagogue

    by tomruth78 Written Mar 27, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Inside the Synagogue

    The Pinkas Synagogue is a definite must see. If when you arrive the place is full of school trips, come back in five minutes and they would have gone. They don't take the time to read information put up, so are gone quickly.

    I did however find that tourists in Prague are very ignorant to signs. I found many taking photographs when there were pictoral signs up saying not to do so! I found this very annoying and totally disrespectful.

    The walls inside Pinkas Synagogue are chillingly covered with the names of 77,297 Jewish Holocaust victims from Bohemia and Moravia. There is also a permanent exhibition of children's drawings from Terezin concentration camp, drawn between 1942 and 1944. Very moving and worth a visit.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • kenbac's Profile Photo

    The Pinkas Synagogue

    by kenbac Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A memorial to the Jewish people from Prague who died in to Holocaust. The names of all 72,000 are inscribed on the walls.
    Upstairs there is a most disturbing display of Children’s painting all dated 1941 or 1942 from
    Terezin (Theresienstadt) concentration camp.
    The paintings are not disturbing. They are just normal Children’s paintings.
    What happened to the Children is.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Prague

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

111 travelers online now

Comments

View all Prague hotels