Rudolfinum, Prague

4.5 out of 5 stars 30 Reviews

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    Rudolfinum

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 26, 2013

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    Rudolfinum
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    Rudolfinum was built between 1876 and 1884 in neo-Renaissance style, according to the designs of Josef Zitek and his student Josef Schulze. It was intended to serve as a multipurpose cultural center. In 1919 until 1941, however, it was converted to the house of the Czechoslovak Parliament.
    Concert activity was restored during the Nazi occupation, but full rehabilitation did not take place until 1992. After a general reconstruction the Rurolfinum became home of the Czech Philharmonic.
    The building is named in honor of Rudolf, Crown Prince of Austria, who presided over the opening. The Dvorak Hall is noted for its excellent acustic. In 1896 Antonin Dvorak himself conducted of Czech Philharmonic in the Hall in its first ever concert.
    The building also contains the Galerie Rudolfinum, an art gallery focused on the contemporary art.

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    The Rudolfinum

    by kris-t Updated Aug 14, 2013

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    The Rudolfinum
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    The Rudolfinum is one of the most noteworthy buildings in Prague and also the best exemple of Czech Neo-Renaissance architecture. It was built between 1876 and 1884. It is named after Austrian Crown Prince Rudolf.

    In 1919 this multipurpose cultural building was converted to the House of Commons of the Czechoslovak Republic.

    In 1992 the Rudolfinum became the home of the Czech Philharmonic and the Rudolfinum Gallery (GR).
    It is home to the annual music festival called "Pražské Jaro" (Prague Spring).

    The GR exhibitions spaces are open to the public on Tuesday-Wednesday and Friday-Sunday from 10:00 to 18:00 and on Thursdays from 10:00 to 20:00.

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    GALLERIE RUDOLFINUM

    by balhannah Updated Aug 4, 2013

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    Gallerie Rudolfinum also known as the "House of Artists," is a large, imposing Neo-Renaissance building named after Habsburg Crown Prince Rudolf. It was constructed beside the River Vltava between 1876 and 1884.

    The building was the home of the Czech parliament, although since 1946, it has been the home of the Gallery Rudolfinum, part is the Museum of Decorative Arts and it's home to the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra.

    I wasn't interested on visiting the collections, although I would have liked to seen the halls which are said to be quite beautiful. I did like the outside with all the statues of composers, sculptors and artists, including Bach, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Mozart, Bramante, Brunelleschi and Donatello.

    OPEN DAILY except Mondays from 10am to 6pm (Thursdays until 8pm).
    Admission to one exhibition is CZK 130

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    The Rudolphinum

    by antistar Updated May 31, 2013

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    The Rudolphinum, Prague
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    Standing alone alongside the Vltava river, the Rudolphinum is a fine example of Neo-Renaissance architecture and one of the grandest buildings in the city. It's a piece of art in itself, but it's also a place of the arts, with its stand-out feature being the Dvorak Hall, an auditorium which is claimed to have the best acoustics in the world.

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    Bicycle tour of Prague, part 5

    by Nemorino Updated Aug 23, 2011

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    1. Our tour group at the Rudolfinum
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    Towards the end of our bicycle tour we crossed the Mánesův Bridge to get back to the right bank of the river, where we had our next-to-last stop in front of the Rudolfinium, which is a concert and exhibition hall and home of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra.

    Unfortunately I was not able to attend a concert of Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, because they were not playing on any of the evenings that I had free. (Operas have priority, of course.)

    The 1880s must have been a decade of intense construction activity in Prague. The National Theater, the State Opera and the National Museum were all built mainly in that decade, and so was the Rudolfinium, a neo-Renaissance building that was opened in 1885. It was named after the ill-fated crown prince Rudolf (1858-1889), who committed suicide four years later. Rudolf was the son and heir of Franz Joseph I, the inexplicably popular emperor of Austria, Hungary and Bohemia, known in Czech as Císař Frantisek Josef I. As I mentioned in my story in the travelogue, my Czech uncle on his deathbed at age 82 still had kind words for Franz Joseph I, for reasons known only to himself.

    Second photo: The Rudolfinum later in the evening.

    >>Next tip!

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    Rudolfinum

    by sue_stone Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    inside the Rudolfinum
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    The Rudolfinum is a magnificent neo-Renaissance building housing the Dvorak Concert Hall. It is located close to the river, near Manesuv Most.

    The Hall is the home base for the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, and what a spectacular home it is! We had the great fortune of see the Orchestra perform here one afternoon and were impressed with these outstanding musicians.

    If you want to see a concert here you can pre-book via the website and collect your tickets prior to the show. We booked some of the best seats on offer and the cost was only a few pounds each.

    Although the concert was on at 3pm, the spectators were all very well dressed….except for us two in our jeans…we had run out of time to get changed before we went to the show. Oh well, they still let us in!

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    Rudolfinum

    by Raimix Updated Jan 31, 2010

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    Rudolfinum is a neo – Renaissance building, constructed in 1876 – 1884 by architects J. Zutek, J. Schulz. Rudolfinum comes from the name of Rudolf, who was Prince of Habsburgs. This complex is used for music, as a spring and autumn music festivals take place here. Well known here is Dvorak hall.

    It is interesting enough, that building was used also by Czechoslovak Parliament – before World War II (1918 - 1938) and just a few years after it (1945 - 1946).

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    Rudolfinum- Palace of music and the fine arts.

    by hundwalder Updated Apr 21, 2008

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    Front view of Rudolfinum.
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    Construction of Rudolfinum, which is one of Prague's many architectural masterpieces, began in 1876, and was completed in only six years. It was named for the Habsburg duke Rodolfo. The architecture of the theater is described as neo-Renaissance, although the neo-Classical discipline is also evident. Much of Rudolfinum, which is home to Czech Republic Philharmonic Orchestra, is occupied by the masterfully designed Antonin Dvorak concert hall. Also contained in the palace is Suk hall, named for classical composer Josef Suk, and an extensive art gallery. Chamber music and music recitals are performed in Suk hall. The great roof balcony or balistrade contains several bronze statues of Bohemian, Moravian, and Austrian composers.

    As would be expected in any Bohemian palace, the interior is adorned with many chandeliers and other outstanding works of Bohemian crystal. The woodwork is also exceptional. The interior is breathtaking and the acoustics are excellent. Dvorak concert hall features one of the best pipe organs in central Europe. Considering that the organ was the first instrument mastered by Antonin Dvorak, this is very appropriate.

    Rudolfinum is located in Palackeho namesti ( square ), which contains some beautiful gardens and sculptures. Good tickets to performances by the Czech Philharmonic orchestra are still reasonably priced, with the best seats priced at about 600 koruna. Dvorak's ninth symphony is performed often. Chamber and solo performances are much less expensive. They are well worth the money.

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    Rudolfinum

    by Cristian_Uluru Written May 5, 2007

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    Rudolfinum

    The Rudolfinum is one of the most beautiful buildings built on the shore of the Vltava River and it is the home of the Czech Philarmonica Orchestra. The Rudolfinum was built between 1876 and 1884 on project of Josef Zitek and Josef Schulz and so called in honor of the prince Rodolfo of Asburgo. The curve baluster is decorated with statues of Czech, German and Austrians composers. Between 1918 and 1939 the Rudolfinum has been center of the Czech parliament.

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    Lovely Place For A Concert

    by Husker_Jeff Updated Nov 28, 2006

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    Rudolfinum
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    We attended a concertino at the Rudolfinum. This involved 7-9 musicians, depending on the piece that was played. This included 3 violins, cello, bass, viola, harpsichord, harp, and flute.

    The lead violin was Roman Fedchuk, who was also the artistic director for this performance. He must be a virtuoso, and this was confirmed by one of local Praguers we met at a pub.

    Some of the pieces featured the harp (Stania Ramesova) and the flute (Marketa Vrbincikova).

    We were very impressed with the music. Nicole especially liked the piece by Smetana (Moldau). She was not familiar with Smetana and and this piece certainly piqued her interest.

    The group played together beautifully, taking their timing cues from Mr. Fedchuk perfectly. The musicians appeared to be very into the performance and gave it their all.

    Mr. Fedchuk impressed everyone during Carmen, where he eschewed the sheet music and played for at least 5-7 minutes by memory alone, again with his fellow musicians taking his cues and keeping perfect time.

    The Rudolfinum is simple and beautiful, as you can see in the pictures. Apparently photos are not allowed, but most people managed to snap a few. I turned my flash off in hopes that I would not be noticed, but the security guard did finally ask me to put it away.

    The program is included in the pictures. Enjoy.

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    Antonin Dvorak Concert Hall

    by vesna04 Written Oct 15, 2005

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    It was built in 1876 and named after the Ausrian crown prince Rudolf. In arhitectual point of view it presents one of the most siginificant neo-renaissance buildings in Prague. It is a multipurpose building housing Antonin Dvorak Concert Hall as well as the picture galery. In its history it has been even a parliament . (in the period between the world wars)

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  • Dvorak Statue in front of Rudolfinum

    by grkboiler Written Oct 31, 2004

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    Dvorak Statue

    Facing the front of the Rudolfinum is a statue of famous Czech composer Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904). He wrote 9 symphonies, 9 operas, and many songs. The concert hall in the Rudolfinum is named after him.

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  • Rudolfinum

    by grkboiler Updated Oct 31, 2004

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    Rudolfinum

    The Rudolfinum is a concert hall where the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra is based. I didn't attend a concert here, but the building itself impressed me. The Neo-Renaissance building was completed in 1885 and was once the seat of Parliament of the Czech Republic.

    If you enjoy classical music, this is one of the best places in Prague to attend a concert. Check the website for a schedule of events. You can also tour the inside.

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    Rudolfinum

    by evona Written Jul 7, 2004

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    Rudolfinum was built 1876-1884 by project of J. Zitek and J. Schulze and this is a great exemple of Czech Neo-Renaissance style. It was named in honour of Crown Prince Rudolf of Habsburg. In 20th and 30th years there was the seat of Chech Senate, today there are the Chech Philharmonic Orchestre and the Rudolfinum Gallery.

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    Night Time

    by Imbi Updated Nov 17, 2003

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    Me and Eva were walking towards Prague castle in the night and we came to this beautiful building. I can?t remember the details of this building. I decide to take of photo of this beautiful building but the only problem was that the street in front of that building was really busy. I had to wait for while in cold windy weather to take this photo, which unfortunately didn?t turn out very beautiful.

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