Wenceslas Square, Prague

3.5 out of 5 stars 150 Reviews

Vaclavske namesti

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  • Veroali's Profile Photo

    Vaclavak

    by Veroali Updated Dec 1, 2009

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    I dont know exactly what to say about Vaclavak. It is just a wide street where are many shops, hotels, bars and casinos. Nothing special. On the other hand, everybody goes there, gather there and if you go to Prague, you wont miss it. Simply a very important place!
    Wenceslas square is the place, where you should beware of pickpockets and so on. Personally, nothing ever happened to me here.

    Towards National museum Vaclavak
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    Lucerna Passage

    by Aitana Written May 15, 2009

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    The Lucerna Passage connects Vodièkova and Štìpánská streets, near Wenceslas Square. It was built by Váklav Havel, grandfather of the former president, between 1907 and 1921, in Art Nouveau style.
    This gallery houses theatres, shops and cafes. In the atrium, a satiric replica of the equestrian statue of Saint Wenceslas by David Cerný hangs from the dome.

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    Wenceslas Square / Vaclavske namesti

    by a5floor Written May 8, 2009

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    The square used to be a medieval horse market and a broad, slopin boulevard. It got its present name during the nationalist revival of the mid-19th century. From that point it was part of a great deal of the Czech history. To name a few:

    In 1848 a giant Mass was held in the square during the revolutionary upheavals.
    In 1918 the creation fo the new Czechoslovak Republic was celebrated here.
    On 17 November 1989 there was a police attack on a student demonstration followed by angry citizens gathering together.
    A week after 17 November 1989 Alexander Dubcek and Vaclav Havel stepped onto the balcony of the Melantrich Building telling people the communism in Czechoslovakia has became to an end.

    Wenceslas Square / Vaclavske namesti
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    Wenceslas Square

    by dejavu2gb Written Mar 28, 2009

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    Wenceslas Square or Vaclavske Namesti is one of the 2 main squares of Prague, the other being Old Town Square.
    Wenceslas is a very vibrant area with many bars, restaurants, clubs, shops etc that is very popular for locals as well as tourist due to the array of things to do there.
    There are some great bars there and also loads of shops for the ones in need of some good retail therapy.
    Its also very picturesque from the top part of the square looking down as its kinda slopes up a hill.
    Its about 750 long and 60m wide and used to server as a horse market

    Wenceslas Square Wenceslas Square Wenceslas Square from the top looking down
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    An interesting history

    by Neit Written Jan 9, 2009

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    Founded in the 14th century by the emperor Charles IV, during several centuries it was a place frequented by the elits of the sorrounding area. More recently, in 1968, the soviet tanks and soldiers passed along the square to finish with the changes brought by the Prague Spring and to strengthen the iron curtain in the frontiers of the country. And it was here too where the Velvet Revolution took place in 1989, when thousands of students raised against the police. In the balcony of what is now Marks & Spencer, Vaclav Havel formally declared the end of the comunism in Czechoslovakia.

    Wenceslao Square
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    Wenceslas Square

    by BruceDunning Updated Aug 10, 2008

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    It really is a boulevard and been a main shopping section for hundreds of years. The latest renovation of the architectural style is about 150 years. The buildings facade hold more interest than the goods being sold inside, I believe. There are very high end shops, but also sleazy, and down right dirty looking shops. The street vendors do only more harm to what could be a beautiful boulevard, with a famed museum at the top end. Prostitutes, casino, and other dingy feeling takes away from the ambiance.
    The square was originally a horse market and barn to sell them, and it had an equine track. The square is 1/2 mile long and 180 feet wide. Many traditions are held here and also protests and uprisings are part of the history. The most famed recent was Velvet Revolution of 1989 throwing off Communism.

    Looking back down the street You could have one of these too-may cost money Night view is pretty Leads to many side alcoves for intimate shopping Nice styled street-pedestrian only
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    The heart of Prague

    by viddra Written Jun 28, 2008

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    This square looks more like a boulevard, because it’s 60m wide and 750m long. It’s packed with hotels, boutiques, fashion stores, cinemas, theatres and night clubs.

    The square has witnessed a lot of most important political events, such as the demonstrations in the 1960s. This is where you can find the monuments to the victims of communism, including Jan Parlah who set himself on fire in 1969 when the country was occupied.

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    hotel evropa

    by doug48 Updated Jun 19, 2008

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    one of the architectural attractions of wenceslas square is the 1904 art nouveau hotel evropa. the hotel has a very interesting art nouveau common area and has a cafe and restaurant. see my accommodations tip for more information.

    hotel evropa
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    wenceslas statue

    by doug48 Written Jun 19, 2008

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    located on the wilsonova end of wenceslas square is the statue of king wenceslas. wenceslas (907-935) was the duke of bohemia. this bronze statue was sculpted by josef myslbek in 1912. at the base of the wenceslas statue are statues of czech patron saints.

    wenceslas statue
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    wenceslas square

    by doug48 Written Jun 19, 2008

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    wenceslas square is really not a square but a avenue that runs from wilsonova to na prikope street. originally a medieval horse market wenceslas square is lined with restaurants, cafes, shops and some interesting buildings.

    wenceslas square
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    vaclavske namesti

    by doug48 Written Jun 14, 2008

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    wenceslas square is located in the heart of new town (nove mesto). originally a medieval horse market wenceslas square is really not a square but a broad avenue that runs from wilsonova street to na prikopi street. the avenue is lined with interesting buildings, cafes, bars, and shops. nearby is the national museum and the state opera.

    wenceslas square
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  • hundwalder's Profile Photo

    Good King Wenceslas looking down over the

    by hundwalder Updated May 17, 2008

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    Feast of Stefan. Actually the feast of Stefan was held at Vysehrad in the days of the good king. See my off the beaten path tips about this most fascinting oldest part of Prague.

    A large and impressive monument to King Wenceslas I and four other Bohemian saints stands boldly on a hill at the head of Vaclavske namesti ( Wenceslas square ). Vaclav I briefly reigned over Bohemia until he was murdered by his power seeking brother at the age of 26. Vaclav I was later canonized, and his since been known as Saint Vaclav. The enormous and triumphant bronze monument which is a great symbol of Czech nationalism, was sculpted by Josef Myslbek from 1887 to 1924.

    Photo #1 which was taken from in front of the national museum of the Czech Republic, shows the rear of the monument and part of Wenceslas square. As is evident in the photo, because there is a divided boulevard running through the front half of Vaclavske namesti, that it is not a true city square. However, because traffic is very restricted on the boulevard, the square is more pedestrian friendly than it at first appears. Vaclavske namesti is lined with fascinating buildings ranging in architecture from Renaissance to modern. Many elegant to plain shops, restaurants, pubs, crystal boutiques, fast food joints, etc., line the square. There is even a super market to buy food, pivo (beer), and other picnic supplies, in the sprawling Mustek Metro (subway) station, located in the very center of the square. The square contains many well maintained gardens, thought provoking monuments, and numerous benches on which to rest your weary bones and to enjoy your supermarket purchased picnic.

    Photo #2 shows the St. Vaclav monument tastefully framed againt the Narodni muzeum ( national museum ) of the Czech Republic. The architecture of the museum is a combination of neo classical and art nouveau. The museum is filled with great art works and artifacts from the proud but difficult hsitory of Bohemia, Moravia, Czechoslovakia, and the Czech Republic. The monument and museum are located just a few meters from Metro ( subway / underground ) station Narodni muzeum.

    Contrary to popular opinion, Vaclavske namesti is not the commercial center of Prague. Most locals cannot afford the exhorbitant prices charged in most of the shops and therefore, they do their shopping far from the great square. Indeed most of the shoppers are tourists.

    Wenceslas monument and square viewed from museum. Wenceslas monument framed ny national museum.
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  • seasonedveteran's Profile Photo

    Eastern Europe?? Naaaa!

    by seasonedveteran Written Mar 28, 2008

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    If you only have time for one, see This Famous Street, because it is so wondrous, and beautiful, especially at night, which is really only when i saw it. A impressive commercial district, you would think it is Paris Champ Elysee rather than an avenue in Eastern Europe. Just train yourself to ward off the Africans and others trying to lure you in to their strip clubs, especially if you are a group of males.

    The street is elevated, and on the top is the absolutely stunning Museum house. And an enormous statue of a horsemen. A friend of mine actually had his hotel on this street! LUCKY!

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  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    St. Wenceslas Monument

    by von.otter Written Jan 8, 2008

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    Good King Wenceslas looked out
    On the Feast of Stephen
    When the snow lay ’round about
    Deep and crisp and even
    — The first stanza of “Good King Wenceslas”

    John Mason Neale (1818-1866) first published “Good King Wenceslas” in 1853, as a Christmas carol, but it is set on St. Stephen’s Day, the day after Christmas. There’s no telling if the scene described in the carol took place; the Cambridge-educated Neale’s motive for writing it was that it would serve as an example of Christian charity for his fellow Victorians.

    The St. Wenceslas Monument dominates the eastern end of Wenceslas Square, one of the principal squares in his nation’s capital. It is the creation of Josef Václav Myslbek (1848-1922). Dating from 1912, it pays tribute to the patron saint of the Czech Republic and Bohemia. St. Wenceslas is surrounded by St. Prokop, patron saint of the Slovakia Republic; St. Adalbert, the first bishop of Prague; St. Ludmila, his grandmother; and St. Agnes, his sister.

    Wenceslas was born in AD 902 and became king of Bohemia at the age of 20. He was a devout Catholic. Because he recognized the political claims of neighboring German princes he aroused hostility of some of the nobles in his kingdom. These dissatisfied subjects rallied round Wenceslas’ brother, Boleslav, who murdered the king in AD 929 while he was at his evening prayers. Wenceslas has been honored as a saint since AD 985.

    St. Wenceslas Monument, Prague, December 2001 St. Wenceslas Monument, Prague, December 2001 St. Wenceslas Monument, Prague, December 2001
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    Wiehl House on Wenceslas Square

    by von.otter Updated Jan 8, 2008

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    “On Prague’s proud arch the fires of ruin glow, His blood-dyed waters murmuring far below.”
    — Thomas Campbell, (1777-1844), English poet from “Pleasures of Hope” part I, line 385

    AROUND WENCESLAS SQUARE — Most of the buildings lining the Square date from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. One of the most beautiful is #34, the Wiehl House (Wiehluv dum), named for its architect, Antonin Wiehl.

    Completed in 1896, this five-story, Neo-Renaissance-styled building’s sgraffito decoration in the Art Nouveau style is stunning. These designs are by Mikulas Ales, a popular 19th century Czech designer.

    Wiehl House, Wenceslas Square, Prague, 12/01 Wiehl House, Wenceslas Square, Prague, 12/01 Wiehl House, Wenceslas Square, Prague, 12/01
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