Prague Transportation

  • Transportation
    by croisbeauty
  • Transportation
    by croisbeauty
  • Transportation
    by croisbeauty

Most Recent Transportation in Prague

  • stevemt's Profile Photo

    Prague Metro

    by stevemt Updated Aug 25, 2015

    The Prague metro is great. - Fast, frequent and really cheap.

    A great way to travel/get round Prague, and really convenient to boot.

    There are metro stations everywhere in the down town area, but less frequent of course as you get out of the city.

    Certainly worth using and and said really cheap :)

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  • Maurizioago's Profile Photo

    The Prague Integrated Transportation System.

    by Maurizioago Updated Aug 20, 2015

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    The P. I. T. system comprises buses, trams, metro and the Petrin funicular. Once you bought your travel ticket or travel pass you are allowed to travel by every one of these means.

    The metro network currently has three lines with around 50 stations; A (green). B (yellow) and C (red). Trains run from around 4.45 a. m. to midnight.

    Trams. Their daytime operation is from 4.30 a. m. to midnight. Night operation is from midnight to 4.30 a. m.

    Night buses operate from midnight until 4.30 a. m.

    There are various kinds of travel tickets and passes on sale. For instance you can buy a 30 minutes ticket or a 90 minutes ticket.

    If you are going to use the public means in the city quite a lot I think 24 hour passes (or 3 day passes; 72 hours) is useful.

    Tickets are sold in lots of places like metro stations, newsagents, kiosks and from vending machines.

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  • steedappeal's Profile Photo

    Much better than the Segways!

    by steedappeal Updated Aug 20, 2015

    Here is an appealing development since my last visit: driving tours of the city in newly built "old" cars.

    At least, these look like they belong in Old Prague.

    One driver I asked said rates start at about 50 Euros on up.

    They are mainly parked in The Old Town square area.

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  • steedappeal's Profile Photo

    Easy as A, B ,C

    by steedappeal Updated Aug 17, 2015

    This was the first time I used the Prague Metro. It is efficient, clean and safe. A easy way to reach major spots around the city. There are just three lines: A, B and C.

    Instead of hassling with buying individual trips, I purchased a 24 hour ticket for 110.00 crowns. Great value. Just remember to stamp ONCE upon your first entry into the system. The entire network is based on the honor system. You also have unlimited transfers to the tram system (which is a more extensive).

    ***Please note that the 24 hour ticket is only sold at certain major stations (like Staroměstská) or at the transit counter at the Prague airport, where you can also request an excellent map.***

    Some stations are also transfer hubs, a fact made easily clear by the color coded signage. Staroměstská in Pargue 1 is closest to the Old Town Square whereas Jiřího z Poděbrad is an excellent choice for exploring Prague 2. Florenc is the stop if you are connecting to the main bus terminal.

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  • steedappeal's Profile Photo

    FLORENC Bus Station

    by steedappeal Updated Aug 14, 2015

    FLORENC is Prague's main bus station. It is just above the FLORENC Metro station.

    Surprisingly, it is user friendly, clean, efficient and not at all dodgy.

    There is usually someone who speaks English at the Information Desk.

    Even the bathrooms are well organized as you must purchase a ticket to enter!

    Different bus companies have windows here, especially Student Agency which offers great value for trips to and from Prague (please see my Brno page for further information on this excellent service).

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  • steedappeal's Profile Photo

    Mike's Chauffeur Service

    by steedappeal Written Aug 14, 2015

    Usually, I would take the el cheapo bus but was feeling lazy, with a bit more luggage than usual.

    This service is friendly, reliable and honest in an unmarked town car, all for the same price as a local taxi.

    My excellent driver, Mirek, was most capable and helpful. His cell is 420.603.53.94.61.

    Was 600 crowns plus tip from Airport and 550 crowns if booked to Airport at same time as initial pickup.

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Prague main station

    by Nemorino Updated Jul 19, 2015

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    The main railway station is called Praha hlavní nádraží in Czech. The front end of the station has been enlarged and completely re-built in recent years. After leaving your train you have a long way to walk, but when you finally reach the exit you come out into a strip of park called Vrchlického sady.

    Second photo: In the Czech Republic (as in France, for example) trains do not have set tracks that are listed in the timetable. Instead, the track numbers are allotted a few minutes before departure time, which is why in Czech and French railroad stations you always see people standing around and staring at the departure board until the track number of their train appears. If they are lucky, they might have ten or fifteen minutes time to reach their platform before the train leaves. This last-minute allocation of track numbers is supposed to increase the efficiency of the stations, but I'm not at all sure it really does. As a passenger I prefer the Swiss and German system of allocating tracks in advance and listing them in the timetable, even though changes are sometimes necessary in case of delays.

    Third photo: A double-decker suburban train in Prague main station.

    Metro: Hlavní Nádraží (line C).
    GPS 50° 4′ 59″ North; 14° 26′ 9″ East.

    1. Prague main station 2. Waiting for their track numbers 3. Suburban train in Prague main station
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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Praha Bikes

    by Nemorino Updated Jul 19, 2015

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    This is a bicycle shop which rents bikes and also runs bicycle tours. I took one of their "classic" city tours, as I have described in my Things to Do tips starting with # 20.

    As you can see in the second photo, the same company runs "Pub Crawl" tours in the evenings, starting at their own "Pub Crawl" bar adjoining the bike shop. I have never taken one of these, obviously, but they have a video on their website explaining how it works. You meet at their bar and start drinking, then go out together to four different pubs and a club.

    Their video is in English but is apparently intended to appeal to Ballermann-type Germans, i.e. it makes the tour sound like a drunken brawl. But I ran into one of their tour groups in town one evening and it looked very pleasant. The group consisted of four or five perky college girls from various countries with a big, friendly, muscular young man in a "pub crawl" T-shirt to look after them.

    Second photo: At the entrance to Praha Bikes, trying out a bike before the "classic" bike tour. Note the Praha Bikes banner on the left and the Pub Crawl banner on the right.

    Third photo: Praha Bike folder.

    Address: Dlouha 24, Prague 1

    1. Praha Bikes meeting point 2. Trying out a bike before the tour 3. Praha Bike folder
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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Explore Prague by metro

    by HORSCHECK Updated Jul 7, 2015

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    Prague has an extensive public transport network, which consist of trams, buses, metro and even a funicular railway.

    The metro is Prague's most important mode of transport. It was inaugurated 1974 and nowadays it consists of three lines (A-green, B-yellow, C-red). The lines have 3 interchange stations in the city centre: Museum, Mustek and Florenc. The metro runs daily between approximately 5:00 h and midnight.

    Tickets for the public transport can be bought in advance from kiosks and machines. They have to be stamped at the entrance of the metro station.

    In 2003 I stayed 8 days in the city, so the best option was a 15 day pass for 280 CZK. On my second trip to Prague in 2014 I only bought single tickets as a reasonable day pass didn't exist anymore. Single tickets for 30 minutes cost 24 CZK and for 90 minutes cost 32 CZK.

    In 2014 I noticed many ticket inspections on the metro platforms, so make sure to always have a validated ticket available.

    Metro station Vysehrad (red line C) Prague metro at Cerny Most (yellow line B) Prague metro at Cerny Most (yellow line B) Metro station Andel  (yellow line B)
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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Taking The Funicular Up Petrin Hill

    by johngayton Written Mar 14, 2015

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    Petrin Hill really is a bit of a must do here in Prague - the views from the tower are stunning and the beautifully-tended parks a welcome respite from the tourist chaos of the city itself.

    Unless you're feeling particularly energetic the best way to get up Petrin Hill is by the funicular train, which is a "thing to do" in its own right, offering scenic overviews of the city as it ascends. This isn't a tourist service but is rather part of the city's public transport system and runs every 10 minutes in the summer and every 15 in the winter from 09.00 until 23.30.

    The base station is in the middle of Mala Strana at “Ujezd”, on the tram lines 12, 22 & 23 and because it's part of the transport network passes and transfer tickets are perfectly valid.

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Prague Airport - Letiste Praha

    by johngayton Written Mar 14, 2015

    Prague's international airport, named after Vaclav Havel the former prime minister, is located about 17 km north of the city centre. This is a busy, modern, airport serving dozens of airlines to and from destinations all over Europe including most of the European budget carriers.

    There are two main terminals; for Schengen and non-Schengen flights, and as to be expected both terminals have all the facilities required by passengers including ATMs, shops, restaurants and travel services.

    Although as yet there are not direct train or Metro connections (I believe these are still in the planning stages) there are several options for travel to and from the city centre using public transport.

    The two direct options are the Airport Express bus, AE, or the minibus shuttles. The AE bus terminates at the main railway station with a journey time of about 35 minutes and costs 60 CZK one-way. The scheduled minibus shuttle runs every 30 minutes to Namesti Republiki (Republic Square) with a journey time of the same and costs 150 CZK. Both these prices are as of March 2015. In addition to the scheduled minibus there's a shared, door-to-door, hotel service but I have no specific information about that.

    Neither of these direct options are part of the city public transport system and so transport passes cannot be used and separate tickets must be bought.

    Personally I've only used the city public transport network, buying a pass from the tourist office in the arrivals hall at T1. There are three bus services which connect the airport to the Metro:

    #119 to Metro A at Dejvicka (24 mins)
    #100 to Metro B at Zlicin (18 mins)
    #179 to Metro B at Nove Butovide (45 mins)

    The airport website has details of all transport options and links to timetables and fares.

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    7 Denni Prestupni Jizdenka

    by johngayton Updated Mar 14, 2015

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    If staying in Prague for a few days these tickets are amazing value for money. You can buy a 1/3/7 or 15 day ticket which will allow unlimited local transport on buses, trams, metro and local rail services including transfer to airport. It is also valid for the funicular up Petrin Hill.

    The ticket I bought was the 7 Days Transfer Ticket and cost 280 Kc, about 7 GBP, (October 2005)which given that my hotel offered me an arranged taxi to the airport for a set price of 750 Kc each way gives an idea of just how cheap this pass is.

    I bought mine at the desk in the arrivals hall at the airport , and I think you can also buy them at main metro stations, some newsagents and tourist info offices.

    The website has an English language option (top left corner).

    See also my tram and metro tips.

    Ticket
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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    To Prague by IC Bus

    by HORSCHECK Written Feb 13, 2015

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    In December 2014 I used the IC Bus from Mannheim via Nürnberg to get to Prague. Interesting enough the IC buses are operated by the German railway company Deutsche Bahn and therefore tickets can be purchased on the Bahn website or at the train stations. Unfortunately there are no direct train connections between Mannheim and Prague anymore.

    The buses are even integrated in the train network, so that I was able to book a single ticket from my home train station to Prague. The ticket included the mandatory seat reservation on the bus.

    The journey time from Mannheim via Nürnberg to Prague is 6 h 45 mins and the bus runs 4 times per day. Prices start at 29 Euro.

    Unfortunately due to some snowy road conditions on the German highways my bus had a massive delay, still the trip was quite comfortable and I could make use of the free on-board WiFi.

    In Prague the IC buses stop righ in front of the main train station (Hlavni nadrazi), whereas most other long distance buses go to the bus station at Prague Florenc.

    Still I prefer travelling by train, but these long distance buses are well worth a try if there are no other options.

    IC bus in Mannheim IC bus in Prague
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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Explore Prague by tram

    by HORSCHECK Updated Feb 8, 2015

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    Prague has an extensive public transport network, which consist of trams, buses, metro and even a funicular railway.

    There are approximately 30 tram lines (day and night routes), which cover almost 500 kilometres of the city. Tickets can be bought in advance from kiosks and machines. They have to be stamped on the tram.

    In 2003 I stayed 8 days in the city, so the best option was a 15 day pass for 280 CZK. On my second trip to Prague in 2014 I only bought single tickets as a reasonable day pass didn't exist anymore. Single tickets for 30 minutes cost 24 CZK and for 90 minutes cost 32 CZK.

    Prague tram #3 Tram #6 at Teplarna Michle Tram #11 at Teplarna Michle Tram #6 at Teplarna Michle Tram #23 at Malostranska (2003)
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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    To Prague by train

    by HORSCHECK Updated Feb 7, 2015

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    Prague's main train station (Hlavni nadrazi) is an important transportation hub for both local and international trains. In 2003 I took daytrips to Karlsteijn and Kutna Hora from here. The trip to Kutna Hora took just less than 1 hour and the return ticket cost 112 CZK, whereas a return ticket to Karlsteijn was only 58 CZK (2003).

    On my trip in December 2014 left Prague by train to Olomouc: I bought the single ticket for 220 CZK at the train station and left Prague at 12:19 h. The train arrived in Olomouc at 14:44 h and then headed further to Zilina in Slovakia.

    After an interesting week in the Czech Republic I came again through Prague by train on my way home from Brno. The Eurocity which came from Bratislava also stopped in Prague before it went to Dresden, Berlin and Ostseebad Binz on the German island of Rügen.

    Besides the main train station, Prague has some local train stations like Holesovice nadrazi in the north of the city and Masarykovo nadrazi near the Republic Square.

    Directions:
    Prague's main train station (Hlavni Nadrazi) is located about 1,5 km east of the historic old town and approximately 5 minutes on foot from the Wenceslas Square. The metro station "Hlavni Nadrazi" (line C) can be found just underneath the train station.

    Praha hlavni nadrazi (2014) Praha hlavni nadrazi (2014) Historic building of Prague's main train station Train to Prague in Dresden (D, 2008) Praha hlavni nadrazi (2003)
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Prague Transportation

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