Breclav Local Customs

  • Breclav Synagogue upstairs
    Breclav Synagogue upstairs
    by budapest8
  • Breclav Synagogue exterior
    Breclav Synagogue exterior
    by budapest8
  • Breclav Tourist information Veronika
    Breclav Tourist information Veronika
    by budapest8

Most Recent Local Customs in Breclav

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    Breclav Synagogue

    by budapest8 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    MORE TXT COMING SOON

    Municipal Museum and Gallery – Bøeclav Synagogue

    EVENTS

    July 27-September 30 2006 History of the Jews in Bohemia and Moravia
    and Jewish Customs and Traditions
    – travelling exhibitions of the Jewish Museum in Prague

    Jewish History

    HISTORY: The earliest record of the Jewish community of Breclav dates from 1414,
    although the community may have existed since the founding of the town in 1030.
    In the 16th century the community was large enough to have a temple.
    In 1572 Yehuda ben Bezalel Löw-Liva was chairman of the synod of Moravian rabbis in Breclav.
    As in other Moravian cities, in 1574 the Jews of Breclav suffered a brutal pogrom until Kaiser Maximillian II took them under his protection.
    The war years of 1605, 1619-1622 and 1643 hit the Jews of Breclav particularly
    hard because the town itself became a battleground. On 28 June 1605 the troops of the
    Hungarian Prince Bocskay plundered the town.
    At the beginning of the 30-years war the castle and the town were burned
    to the ground by the Kaiser's troops. The town was afflicted by the Turks
    and the Tatars. In 1638 the town had just 20 Jewish inhabitants in 6 houses.
    The invasion by the Swedes on 3 May 1643 and the following plague caused
    many deaths. The temple and cemetery were destroyed and the
    community practically annihilated.

    Breclav Synagogue inside Brecav Synagogue Brecav Synagogue Breclav Synagogue inside Breclav Synagogue upstairs
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    Breclav Synagogue & Museum

    by budapest8 Updated Nov 22, 2006

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    more TEXT COMING soon

    More than 25 billion Czech Kroner has been spent on
    restoration of the synagogue and the Museum if I understood correctly?.
    So for the guided tour of the 2 floors of the museum
    and opening the synagogue especially for us for half an hour,
    the fee of 50 Czech Kronor was well worth while.
    If I understood well only 50 Jews remain today in Breclav
    and the 600+ perished in the death camps.
    There are hundreds of bits of info and pictures on the Czech and local
    Jewish history upstairs in the synagogue.

    Breclav Museum former Jewish school Decorative iron railings in Breclav Museum Decorative iron railings in Breclav Museum could be an Esher picture in Breclav The Iron angels couldn't save the children
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    Breclav Jewish CEMETRIES cont

    by budapest8 Written Nov 22, 2006

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    A pre-burial house with wall inscriptions and a custodian's house are located
    within the boundaries of the cemetery. Security (uncontrolled access), weather erosion,
    pollution, vandalism, and vegetation are moderate threats. Incompatible nearby
    development (existing, planned or proposed) is a serious threat.
    The vegetation overgrowth in the cemetery is a constant problem,
    disturbing stones. Water drainage at the cemetery is a seasonal problem.
    The cemetery survey was conducted on 8 March 1992 by: ing. Arch. Jaroslav Kelovsky,
    Zebetinska 13, 623 00 Brno.

    REFERENCES FROM http://www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/e-europe/czecha-e.html#B

    Brno Jewish Cemetery
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    Breclav Jewish CEMETERIES

    by budapest8 Updated Nov 22, 2006

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    The cemetery location is suburban, on flat land, and isolated with no sign
    but with inscriptions on the pre-burial house. The cemetery is reached by
    turning directly off a public road. Access to the cemetery is open.
    The cemetery is surrounded by a continuous masonry wall with a gate that locks.
    The size of cemetery is 0.8534 hectares, unchanged since before WWII.
    Most of the 500-1,000 gravestones in the cemetery are in their original location,
    with 20-100 not in their original locations and 50-75% of the surviving stones
    toppled or broken. The oldest known gravestone is 1709.
    Tombstones in the cemetery are datable from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries.
    Tombstones and memorial markers made of marble, granite, limestone, and sandstone.
    Tombstones are flat shaped stones, finely smoothed and inscribed stones,
    flat stones with carved relief decoration, double tombstones, multi-stone monuments,
    and obelisks, some with traces of painting on their surfaces, iron decorations or lettering, bronze decorations or lettering, and/or metal fences around graves.
    Inscriptions are in Hebrew, German, and/or Czech. The cemetery contains
    no known mass graves. The present owner of the cemetery property is the
    municipality. The property is now used for Jewish cemetery purposes and recreational
    use (park, playground, sports field.) Properties adjacent to the cemetery are residential. Private individuals visit the cemetery occasionally. The cemetery is known to have been vandalized during World War II, and repeatedly since then. Care of the cemetery consists
    of re-erection of stones and clearing of vegetation by local non-Jewish residents,
    local or municipal authorities, regional or national authorities, and Jewish groups
    within the country. Restoration work was carried out in the 1980s.
    Care now consists of occasional clearing or cleaning authorized by local/regional
    authorities and performed by a caretaker paid by a local contribution.

    Breclav Synagogue
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    Breclav Jewish History cont.1

    by budapest8 Written Nov 22, 2006

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    In 1787 the Jews of Breclav were required to take family names.
    A document dated 29 September 1787 shows the old and new names of 61 families.
    It is reproduced in Hugo Gold's 1929 book.
    The names taken include: Sternfeld, Kuffner, Schwitzer, Stern, Brum, Fischer, Neubach, Singer, Mai, Altbach, Volk, Weiss, Neumann, Rosenbaum, Klinger, Ditz, Bohrer, Grünbaum, Reich, Künstler, Fränk, Sulzer, Stein, Heiliger, Mallowan, Hoffmann, Haas, Zechner, Reiner, Gröger, Glück, Zeilinger, Petersel, Bittner, Schwoner, Lang, Goldschmidt, Blau, Weinberger, Goldreich, Morgenstern, Stöhr, Weiss, Nascher and Schlesinger.

    In 1797 there were 325 Jews in Breclav;
    363 in 1830;
    434 in 1848;
    457 in 1857;
    532 in 1869;
    649 in 1879;
    740 in 1890;
    759 in 1900;
    and 589 in 1930 (4.3% of the total population).

    On 21 November 1805 French troops occupied the town before the battle of Austerlitz.
    The town remained occupied until 3 January 1806.
    On 24 March 1812 a fire broke out at the Jewish butcher's
    and destroyed all the Jewish houses. 16 Jews died in the cholera epidemic of 1831,
    and 10 Jews during the epidemic of 1866. 16 Jews from Breclav died in World War I,
    while the community cared for thousands of refugees from Galicia and Bukovina.
    In 1942, all the remaining Jews were deported and none survived.

    Breclav Synagogue exterior
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    Breclav Jewish History cont.

    by budapest8 Updated Nov 22, 2006

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    In 1651 a second group of Jewish inhabitants came to the town from Feldsberg,
    Austria (now Valtice, Moravia) with the permission of Prince Karl Eusebius Liechtenstein and his wife Johanna Beatrix. The temple was rebuilt in 1672. In 1697,
    as the men assembled outside the synagogue in the bitter cold for
    the evening prayers and waited for the temple servant who was late
    bringing the key, the roof fell in. To commemorate the miracle,
    the day 11 Tebet became a holiday and fast day in Breclav.
    In 1702, 30 Jewish families lived in 12 houses in Breclav.
    Around 1723, the Prince was engaged in a fierce chess match in Vienna with
    a visiting Marquis from France. Seeing no way out of his position, and fearing
    the loss of his princely wager, the Prince asked the Marquis to postpone
    the match so that he could call on one of his tenants in Breclav,
    who he was convinced could win the match. The pieces were put
    under glass and the game was postponed while the Prince sent for the Jew Juda Löb.
    Juda looked over the position and said that although it looked bad for the Prince,
    the game was not yet lost. He took over the game and ultimately prevailed
    against the angry Marquis.
    In thanks, the Prince sent Juda home in his own wagon and allowed him to
    build a house on the Prince's land in Unter-Themenau where Juda's descendants,
    the Kuffner family, lived from 1723 to 1871.
    By decree of 24 October 1726, the number of Jewish families was limited to 66.
    During the war of succession between Empress Maria Theresia and the
    Prussian King Friedrich II, on 25 March 1742 the town burned to the ground
    as a result of a smoking accident by a careless Hussar soldier.

    Breclav Synagogue upstairs
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    Breclav Synagogue & Museum

    by budapest8 Written Aug 28, 2006

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    The old Jewish school opposite the synagogue is
    a museum, there was a dog museum on the first floor
    and an art exibition on the second floor called 'Vinspiration'.
    A lot of good local artists showing the effects of wine and alchohol
    on men!

    Staircase in Breclav Museum (old Jewish school) Breclav Museum Memorial plaque in entrance Breclav Museum Clara looking at the Breclav art in the museum Breclav Museum upstairs
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    Breclav Synagogue & Museum

    by budapest8 Written Aug 28, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness


    The old Jewish school opposite the synagogue is
    a museum, there was a dog museum on the first floor
    and an art exibition on the second floor called 'Vinspiration'.
    A lot of good local artists showing the effects of wine and alchohol
    on men!

    Women and wine..local Breclav artist Staircase in Breclav Museum (old Jewish school) Breclav Museum Memorial plaque in entrance
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    Tourist Information Breclav

    by budapest8 Updated Aug 26, 2006

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    Amost for all tourists arriving, make your way to
    the Tourist Information. It's about 15 mins walk or
    approx. when walking from the station and about
    50 Czh Kronor with taxi .
    You will find the tourist office on the right hand side in
    the Breclav Municipal Council building on the ground floor
    and the first door on your right when inside the building.
    They are open 8 to 5 on weekdays and until 2 on Saturdays/Sundays.
    in May to September closed for lunch between 12 to 1 weekdays.
    October to April 7.30-12 12.30-3pm
    Transport info
    Accommodation info & booking with pictures of the rooms and places.
    Services(photo copying, fax, laminating, document binding)
    Information leaflets and brochures,
    ticket office, Ticket Art Agency
    Sale of souvenirs, maps.
    There is internet access for a fee and a very extensive
    collection of local and Czech maps for sale. Veronika who
    helped me with my original inquiries by email spoke the best
    English and the other girls too, but not so fluent.
    They also rent bicycles for a deposit of 1000 Czech Kr
    which is refundable and 20 kr per hour or 200 per day or 250
    for 48 hrs.They also have a bagage room if you wish to leave
    your bags after checking out of your hotel/pension or
    campsite. Very helpful staff and that made my stay even
    more enjoyable!


    Tourist Information Centre Breclav
    nam. T. G. Masaryka 3, 690 81 Breclav
    Czech Republic

    Breclav Tourist information Veronika Breclav's new church next to Tourist Info Breclav street
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    Breclav History cont.

    by budapest8 Written Aug 26, 2006

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    the Liechtensteins further advanced their power in the region,
    acquiring the Breclav estate in 1654. They built many monuments
    and added to the landscape in the area, especially around the end
    of the 18th century. But the finest examples of their work are to be
    found surrounding their chateaus of Lednice and Valtice. Both regal
    chateaus are enclosed by the large wooded park of Bori les. Flush against
    the border with Austria, Valtice was the Liechtenstein's main residence,
    and was actually part of Austria until a small border adjustment in 1918.
    Founded as a castle in the 12th century, it was later re-built as a Baroque
    chateau. It's somewhat stark interiors are in marked contrast to Lednice,
    7 km to the north, which sports an English neo-Gothic look as a result of
    renovation in the mid-19th century. The area in between contains many
    small chapels and monuments of various sorts, and is one of the largest
    natural parks in Europe.

    Breclav Castle
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    Breclav History

    by budapest8 Updated Aug 26, 2006

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    The area around the present city of Breclav was the site of the first Slav settlements in the area in the 6th century A.D., when they came from the southeast along the Danube. A fortress was established here in the 9th century as a part of the Great Moravian Empire, though it was later destroyed in the invasions from Hungary that brought down the empire in the 10th century.

    The successors to the empire, the Premyslidsof Prague, then built a castle named after Prince Bretislav to defend the frontier. With the peace of following centuries came greater colonization, primarily from nearby Austria, peaking in the 13th century. During the Hussite Wars, the area was frequently a battleground between the Hussites and crusading armies from Hungary and Austria, and even after the wars the region was often subject to Hungarian incursions. The most important family in the region, and in the whole country at one time, was the the Liechtensteins, who had been expanding their holdings in the region since the 14th century, at the expense of the local landed nobility. They had already established residences at Lednice (Eisgrub) and Valtice (Feldsburg) to the east of Breznov, and in the confiscations of the estates of Protestant nobles that followed the Thirty Years' War,

    Pohansko reconstruction...early Moravian settlemen
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