Litomerice Off The Beaten Path

  • Church & River Elbe
    Church & River Elbe
    by balhannah
  • Market gardens along the way
    Market gardens along the way
    by balhannah
  • Houses along the way
    Houses along the way
    by balhannah

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Litomerice

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    MELNIK TO LITOMERICE

    by balhannah Written Sep 27, 2013

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    It was by car we travelled from Melnik to Litomerice, most of the way following the River Elbe.
    The drive is quite scenic, passing by many small villages in the distance. As with most, it was the Church & spire that stood out!
    We passed by lots of houses situated on the hillsides, I wondered if they were summer homes or perhaps people lived in them permanently.
    It was along here where we saw acres of healthy vegetable gardens and other crops growing in a very rich soil, no wonder it's known as the "garden of Bohemia."

    Church & River Elbe Market gardens along the way Houses along the way Market gardens along the way
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    City Park

    by german_eagle Written Jun 17, 2013

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    The largest park in town is the city park, called "Jiraskovy sady". It is located close to the train station Litomerice-horni nadrazi where I arrived/departed on my latest visit. It is designed as an English park, opened in 1892.

    There is a monument for the (Soviet) Red Army soldier in the southeastern corner of the park, created by O. Petros in 1975 (pic 2). More interesting than the monument in the typical communist style is the history of monuments at this place: First was a statue of Emperor Franz Josef I. after WWI it was removed. In 1927 they put up a metal relief depicting the history of the town. In the 1950s this relief was replaced by a statue of Josef Stalin, which was replaced again by the current monument.

    The park is relatively well taken care of (could be better) and has some other places of (minor) interest. Pic 3 shows the main water basin with small fountain - nothing special IMO. The catholic wayside shrine (pic 4) was a surprise to me, in good condition. Quite nice looked the cafe (pic 5).

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    Pekarska street

    by german_eagle Written Jun 17, 2013

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    If you are interested in *real* life in the Czech Republic, outside of tourist zones, then you can have that in Litomerice, too. A good example is Pekarska street, a side street from Domska (which leads to the cathedral hill.

    Pekarska is lined by townhouses from the 18th and 19th century, usually in pretty bad shape, then opens up to a small square with apartment blocks built in the communist era in the background. In the middle of the square is a statue depicting St. Mary with a dragon and two little angels, created in 1735. More interesting, however, were the shops and inns/bars along the street - they obviously cater to the local crowd, not the tourists, with low prices and simple food and basic goods. There is even a night club which didn't look very inviting to me.

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    Twin house

    by german_eagle Written Jun 17, 2013

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    The late-Gothic townhouse in the backyard of Jezuitska street 4 has a double-gabled facade, thus got the name "twin" house. It is probably from the end of the 15th century, nobody knows for sure, and it looks like it wasn't restored for quite a while ... At the moment there's an art gallery inside, modern local art was on display which I didn't care for much. According to the guide book there is a large, tall room on the second floor which is completely made of wood, an excellent example of medieval living rooms. Unfortunately it is not open to the public.

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    Velka Dominikanska street

    by german_eagle Written Jun 10, 2013

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    In medieval times this small street was the most important street after Dlouha, the main street, which runs parallel. Both streets start at the place of the former city gate next to the train station Litomerice-mesto and end at the main square Namesti Miru.

    Velka (big) Dominikanska is named after the monastery, which is located on this street (see separate tip). The lower part of Velka Dominikanska (toward the city gate) was the Jewish quarter until 1546, when the jews were expelled from the town by an order of King Ferdinand, asked for by the other citizens of Litomerice.

    Other buildings of significance along the street, the monastery and church aside, are the remains of the city wall with two towers (pic 4), once of them now an art gallery, the three townhouses vis-a-vis the church with their arcades (Gothic houses, the arcades first wooden, in 1790 built in stone. See pic 1.) On pic 5 you see the former hospital of the Holy Cross, erected 1550 and redesigned in late Baroque style 1770, now a conference/business centre. There are also a couple of interesting, nice shops in the alleys - well worth seeing.

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Litomerice Off The Beaten Path

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