Amalienborg Palace, Copenhagen

4 out of 5 stars 73 Reviews

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    Amalienborg Palace
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    The statue in the middle of the square
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    Palace of Crown Prince and Princess,...
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  • Palace at dusk

    by Mariajoy Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    After our VT dinner, we visited the Amelienborg Palace - home to the Danish Royal Family. This has been the Royal Palace since 1794, originally for King Frederik V. There are four wings, two as residences and two are official state buildings.

    The guards are here in two-hourly shifts and march up and down constantly. Occasionally, just to remind us that they are real, they shout at passing cars who dare to slow down for a better view - this is forbidden in the Palace grounds - woe betide any that stop completely!! it made me jump anyway and I was on foot!

    Guard at the palace Royal Palace

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    amalieborg slot

    by doug48 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the amalieborg slot, (palace) is the official residence of queen margrethe II. at noon each day there is the changing of the guard in the palace courtyard. king frederik V built amalieborg slot in 1748 to commemorate the 300 th anniversary of the oldenburg dynasty. the palace complex consists of four identical buildings around a square just north of the nyhaven canal. this palace has been the official residence of the danish royal family since 1794.

    amalieborg palace
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    Royal plaza in the finest European tradition

    by Castaner Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Amalienborg houses the Danish royal family and is a wonderful treat for any visitor. Unfortunately, I didn't have enough time to go for a tour on the inside, but the outside of the palace was still very beautiful. I had wandered over from my hostel (see my Copenhagen page for more information) from Gotheborsgade, then up St. Kogensgade to an intersection right near the Amalienborg. That day, there was some kind of anti-American protest, which made it very difficult to enter the palace area, but I would think that normally this wouldn't be a problem. Be sure to go here if you are in Copenhagen.

    The lovely Amalienborg Palace
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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg

    by barryg23 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Amalienborg is one of the official homes of the Danish Monarchy. It's a huge complex in the north of Copenhagen with four palaces built around a large octagonal courtyard containing a statue of Frederik V in the centre.

    Amalienborg Slot from Marmokirken Frederik V Statue Amalienborg Slot Amalienborg Slot from Marmokirken Amalienborg Slot from Marmokirken

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    Amalienborg Palace

    by sparkieplug24 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Amaliemborg palace consists of 4 seperate buildings or palaces and is where the Danish Royal family live. The Square at the palce is beautiful and there is a large statue in the middle of the square. The Armaliemborg palaces have been home to the royal family since 1794 when christianborg burnt down. The Palace is Guarded by the royal guards in their furry hats and once a day there is a changing of the guard. The statue in the middle of the square is Frederik V

    one of the palaces another of the palaces The palace guard at his guard house another of the palace buildings one of the beautiful palace buildings
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    Amalienborg Palace

    by rcsparty Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This is the home of the Danish royal family. As with most royal palaces througout Europe, watching the changing of the guard is a worthwhile spectacule. The Royal Life Guard leaves Rosenborg Castle at 11:30am in route to Amalienborg. Aftewards, accompanied by the band, the guard returns to Rosenborg.

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  • andrewyong's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Palace

    by andrewyong Updated Apr 4, 2011

    The Royal Palaces are consisted of four inter-facing buildings arranged in a diamond-shaped square to the north of the city. Like the other royal palaces in Scandinavia, they are not fenced up by perimeter walls so the atmosphere is very relax while you watch the changing of the guards.

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  • Miraclemike's Profile Photo

    Changing of the Danish Guard

    by Miraclemike Updated Apr 4, 2011

    The winter residence of the queen and her family. The only thing worthwhile about this palace, for the tourist at least, is the changing of the guard. Watch out, though, or you might not even know it's going on. My friend was not paying attention and the guards almost ran him over. On the other hand, there appeared to be no real distance restrictions, as there are in some ceremonies. A group of children were making the rounds with the guards, making it much more fun and down to earth. Yay, Denmark!

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  • cfuentesm's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Palace

    by cfuentesm Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Amaliemborg Palace is composed by 4 palaces where the royal family lives. The square is considered to be one of the great architectural masterpieces in Europe. Try to catch the changing of the guard at noon.

    Amalienborg Palace Amalienborg Palace Amalienborg Palace Amalienborg Palace Amalienborg Palace
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    Guards in Furry Helmets

    by bpacker Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    After visiting the beautiful white church, we left to look at the royal guards . How could we not? The image of those guards are as iconic to Denmark as the little mermaid if not more. Back in Singapore, we often see imprints of the guards with the furry helmets on countless of Danish cookie tins! Well furry helmet aside, these dudes are actually an elite force of the Danish Army whose main purpose was to protect the Queen. Each guard has a two-hour shift, in which he is to stand in front of a very distinctive red guard house. Of course, if you look carefully inside the guard house you'll notice a red coat. But there's no chance this dude would wear it in the heat of summer, it's meant more for cold or rainy weather .

    Every day at noon, there is a changing of the guard.

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    Amalienborg Slot (Palace)

    by Blatherwick Updated Apr 4, 2011

    This is the Royal Family's current residence in Copenhagen since a major fire destroyed Christiansborg in 1794. You can visit the NW mansion which features royal memorabilia.
    Like most palaces in Europe you can catch the changing of the guard at noon each day.

    Amalienborg Changing of the Guard
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    Amalienborg Slot (Palace)

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Amalienborg is the Royal Family's current residence in Copenhagen. The family also spends much of the year at their summer home in Fredensborg Slot to the north. Amalienborg is comprised of four major buildings -- Christian VII's Palace, Christian VIII's Palace, Frederik VIII's Palace, and Christian IX's Palace -- situated around a central courtyard. This palace became home to the royal family after the second major fire destroyed Christiansborg in 1794.

    Frederik V was King of Denmark from 1746 to 1766. It was during his reign that Amalienborg was constructed. The bronze sculpture of Frederick V sits in the center of Amalienborg. It was created by Frenchman Jacques-Francois-Joseph Saly over the course of 20 years. The statue was completed in 1771 and is considered one of the greatest equestrian statues in the world.

    The main attraction at Amalienborg is the changing of the guards each day at noon. Two of the buildings have had a few rooms open to the public for the past 10 years, and are also worth a visit.

    Amalienborg Palace, Copenhagen Frederik V

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  • Roeffie's Profile Photo

    Direct taken from a fairy tale, The Royal Palace!

    by Roeffie Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Amalienborg Slot

    Residence of the Danish Monarchs, named after a Danish Queen - Sofie Amalie who had a small pleasure palace on this location which burned down in 1689.

    Opening Hours
    In general open all year from about 11.00 hrs to 16.00 hrs.

    Entrance fees
    Adults 40.00 DKK
    Children 10.00 DKK

    Amalienborg

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  • Bigs's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Palace

    by Bigs Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    See were the Danish queen lives!!! Have a look at the change of guardians at noon, they look funny with their hats! I like the nice uniforms. especially the blue ones are quite attractive. They all seems to be very young and have a hard job to stand in front of the palace for hours. Luckily they are allowed to walk a few meters....

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  • tvor's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg palaces

    by tvor Written May 27, 2010

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    This is a large cobbled square with four identical palaces on the sides. The Queen (Margrete II) lives in one and the Crown Prince lives in another. One is for visiting dignitaries. I’m sure other minor Royals probably live in the fourth one. The palaces date to the mid 18th century and there is a museum in one of the buildings where you can see the State rooms. There seemed to be a very long queue to get in when we were in the square.

    It is also used as a traffic roundabout so you have to watch yourself walking through it. The traffic is stopped every day at noon so they can have the Changing of the Guard. It’s not as spectacular and not nearly as much pomp and circumstance as the one in London but it’s more accessible, I think. You stand on the square around the allotted borders and boundaries, where several police keep an eye on the crowd. The guards only number about a dozen and a half. They march here from Christianborg Palace and do some to-ing and fro-ing around one of the palaces as they change shifts.

    Off one side is the large Marmorkirken, or Marble Church, which is also worth a look into . The inside is baroque and a fine example except the church was only finished at the end of the 19th century. It was started in the true Baroque era in the 18th c. but the budget ran out and it was never finished for another 150 years while it say pretty much in ruins. It's lovely now, though with the soaring dome and lovely paintings and plaster work.

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