Amalienborg Palace, Copenhagen

4 out of 5 stars 71 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Amalienborg Palace
    Amalienborg Palace
    by balhannah
  • The statue in the middle of the square
    The statue in the middle of the square
    by jonkb
  • Amalienborg Palace
    by mvtouring
  • JoostvandenVondel's Profile Photo

    Changing of the guards, Amalienborg

    by JoostvandenVondel Written Jun 24, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Changing of the guards
    4 more images

    When the Queen is in residence, the Danish Royal Guards stand outside the palace in two-hour shifts. The best changing of the guards happens when guards from the Rosenborg Castle march through the streets of the capital every day at 11:30 am to switch places with the guards at Amalienborg.

    Try and get to Amalienborg at about 11:50 am to see them marching up from the Marmorkirken to the palace.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • vichatherly's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Palace

    by vichatherly Updated Jun 25, 2007

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    King Frederik V on horseback

    We were wandering around and came upon some royal guards aorund the Amalienborg Palace .

    "The Amalienborg Palace complex consists of four rococo palaces and is the prime residence of Danish Royal family.

    The palace buildings are placed around
    an octagonal square with a equestrian statue of King Frederik V (1723) 1746-66 in the centre, who was the planner and builder of Amalienborg around 1750. "

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • ginte's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Palace

    by ginte Updated Jun 21, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The square of Amalienborg Palace

    Amalienborg Palace is the royal couple's winter residence. It is the most outstanding piece of Rococo architecture in Denmark.

    Tourists can visit two of Amalienborg's palaces (mansions): Christian VIII's Palace, which has been partly turned into a museum of the Glücksburg dynasty; and Christian VII's Palace, which is used by the Queen to receive and entertain guests, but which is occasionally open for guided tours or special exhibitions.

    Very often you can see changing of the guard here. And don't try to sit somewhere in that square - you'll be warned about it by the guard immediatelly.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • QuDee's Profile Photo

    The Royal Palace

    by QuDee Written Apr 16, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Marblechurch seen from Amaliehaven

    Amalienborg is not open to the public. On rare occasions – such as royal birthdays, christenings, weddings etc. – the public has an opportunity to sign books of congratulations and drops off presents with the court administrators office.

    However one can walk freely around the courtyard – in fact, public street goes through it – and watch the changing of the guards at midday. The public Amaliehaven, by the waterfront, is a lovely calm oasis in the city, donated by the owner of Maersk (head offices just to the left down the quay from Amalienborg). Another Maersk donation – the operahouse – is just across the harbour, and the best view of it is of course from Amaliehaven.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Royal Castle

    by Sjalen Updated Apr 15, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Well, if you're in town, why not see it. I'm not a royalist myself but I accept them and the Danish royals belong to the less stiff and the Danes themselves with a few exceptions absolutely adore anything to do with their royal family. The changing of the guards is at 12.00 daily and if you want to know more about that, Allan (TheView) is the one to contact as he used to be one! All in all, the palace is a nice place as it is so close to the seaside and you can wander around outside much as you please. The Queen lives in one wing and there is also a castle museum so that you can actually visit some of the interior too. If you want to see my photos from when the Crown Prince's married his Tasmanian Mary a few years ago, have a look at the travelogues on my Denmark page.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Seniors

    Was this review helpful?

  • Amelienborg Slotsplads

    by Mariajoy Updated Nov 8, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    After our VT meeting dinner we went for a stroll to the Royal palace and to the Amelienborg Slotsplads and along Amelienhaven. The fountain is directly in front of the Opera House which is on the opposite side of Inderhavnen. As it started raining we decided to visit the very new and very trendy (and expensive!) Salt Bar for a drink before making our way back to the city centre.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Marpessa's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg and Amaliehaven

    by Marpessa Written Jan 7, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Statue of King Frederik V
    3 more images

    Amalienborg Slot is the winter residence of the Royal family. It contains four palaces (that from the outside look exactly the same) on an octagonal square. I found it slightly weird that I was just able to walk right through the middle of the square, being a palace, I thought it would have all the gates locked or something. But I thought it was very cool that you could just stroll through there and have a look. In the centre of the square you will see a statue of a man on a horse. This is King Frederik V - the founder of the palaces. The first time I saw Amalienborg Slot was on TV for the wedding of Prince Frederik to (the now) Crown Princess Mary (formerly Mary Donaldson of Tasmania, Australia). After their wedding ceremony, they stood from one of the balconies and waved to the enormous crowd below.

    Across from Amalienborg, right in front of the harbour, you will find Amaliehaven. This is a beautiful and modern garden. There isn't any grass here to sit on, but there are excellent fountains, trees, shrubs and plenty of benches to sit on.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • bpacker's Profile Photo

    Amaliehavn-The most beautiful garden in Copenhagen

    by bpacker Updated Sep 23, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fredriks Church, fountain and palace

    After lunch at Nyhavn, it seemed only appropriate to pop into the harbour area of Amaliehavn. We walked around and saw young Danish families having picnics on the lovely grounds. Just as we reached the fountain, we realised that if we stood at the right spot by the fountain, we'd be able to see Frederikskirke (Fredriks Church) and Amalienborg, the home of the Danish King and Queen and Crown Princess Mary!

    Do note that there is no public access to the residence of Queen Margrethe II and the immensely popular Australian Crown Princess Mary! But you can still tour the Amalienborg Museum, housed in a part of the complex. The museum is dedicated to the more recent history of the royal Danish house, the oldest unbroken monarchy in the world. If you're there at noon however, you can catch the changing of the guards.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • dejavu2gb's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Palace

    by dejavu2gb Written Feb 23, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Amalienborg Palace
    1 more image

    Amalienborg Palace, is the current residence of the Royal family of Denmark.
    Changing of the guard is at noon every day.
    The guards are not as stern as those in England, and these gave us a smile and nodded when we asked if we could have our picture taken next to him.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • rwlittle's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Slots, and Amalienborg Slotspad

    by rwlittle Written Feb 1, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Amalienborg Slots, and Amalienborg Slotspad

    Amalienborg Slotspad is the square in the center of the Queen's palace/residence, which is Amalienborg Slots. The palace is comprised of four nearly identical buildings. The Queen lives in only one of them, called Schack Palace, and when she's present there's a Danish flag flying. The buildingd were originally built as the homes for four wealthy traders, but the royal family moved in folliwng a fire which left them otherwise homeless, in 1794.

    The square gives a feeling of open-ness and approachability. It's all cobblestone, so watch your step!

    Nearby is the grand church of Frederikskirken.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pieter11's Profile Photo

    The Amalienborg Palace

    by Pieter11 Written Jan 25, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The museum in the Amalienborg Palace was opened in 1994, as a replacement of the exhibitions in the Rosenborg Castle. At the first floor of this lovely building you´ll find a couple of rooms with beautiful antique furnishment of the Glücksburg dynasty.

    For the public only Christian IX's studyingroom, Queen Louise's livingroom, Frederik VIII's studyingroom, Christian X's studyingroom and Christian X's diningroom are opened. All the furnishment is taken from other houses and were taken to here with the best care possible. Each element is situated at the same place that the furnishment of the royal family used to take in. You can also take a look inside the closet of the king and see all the royal clothes.

    The museum is opened daily from 10:00 - 16:00, but is closed in Christmas Time.

    Entrance fee is 40 DK for adults and 10 DK for children

    Was this review helpful?

  • grayfo's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Palace

    by grayfo Updated Oct 26, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Amalienborg is the winter residence of Queen Margrethe, her husband Prince Henrik and their son the Crown Prince Frederik. The flag bearing her colours and coat of arms fly whenever the Queen is at home. The royal palace is not one, but really four different palaces flanking a square. The palaces were built by four noble families in the middle of the 18th century on the direct orders of King Frederik V. The King needed a new royal palace but didn't want to pay so the families were given tax immunity for 40 years as a token of their services to the crown.

    In 1794 the royal family moved into the four palaces around the square, which is considered to be one of the greatest architectural masterpieces in Europe. The French artist Saly sculptured the statue of Frederik V that is situated in the middle of the square.

    Whilst we were there a gate opened and we were nearly knocked down by a speeding car containing the late Queen Ingrid, the Queen Mother.

    Was this review helpful?

  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Palace

    by tini58de Updated Aug 17, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Amalienborg Palace

    Amalienborg is the residence of the Royal Family. The story behind this palace, that actually consists of four different palaces flanking a square, is quite funny: in the 18th century King Frederik V. needed a new palace, but did not want to pay for it. He asked 4 noble families to build palaces for him and in return they were given tax immunity for 40 years as token for their services to the crown.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • barrikello's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg

    by barrikello Written Jun 24, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    amalienborg

    Amalienborg is the residence of the Danish Royal family, built in 1750 by Eigtved. Apart from this boring stuff, the four buildings that create the octagonal square are almost identical. That's the place where there's the changing of the guard - vagtparade - , a 'show' worth a visit. Amalienborg is a bit "far from the madding crowd" in the sense that it is not really deepened in Copenhagen bustling center, and thus it is pleasant to walk on the square. At the center of it, there is the statue of Frederik V.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • AcornMan's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg

    by AcornMan Written Apr 28, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Amalienborg, the royal couple's winter residence, is a major architectural work and probably the most outstanding piece of Rococo architecture in Denmark. Amalienborg comprises four externally uniform (but internally different) palaces encircling an octagonal courtyard, in the middle of which has been erected an equestrian statue of Frederik V ? the founder of the Amalienborg Palace complex and the Frederiksstad.

    Amalienborg was originally conceived as town mansions for families of the nobility at the beginning of the 1750s. In 1794, after the fire at Christiansborg Castle, the mansions came into the possession of the Royal Family. They were built on land formerly occupied by the Sophie Amalienborg Palace that had burnt down.

    Today, the public can visit two of Amalienborg's palaces (mansions): Christian VIII's Palace, which has been partly turned into a museum of the Gl?cksburg dynasty; and Christian VII's Palace, which is used by the Queen to receive and entertain guests, but which is occasionally open for guided tours or special exhibitions.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Copenhagen

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

82 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Amalienborg Palace
3.5 out of 5 stars
1 Review
0.2 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
9 Reviews
0.2 miles away
Show Prices
3.5 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
0.2 miles away
Show Prices

View all Copenhagen hotels