Amalienborg Palace, Copenhagen

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  • Amalienborg Palace
    Amalienborg Palace
    by balhannah
  • The statue in the middle of the square
    The statue in the middle of the square
    by jonkb
  • Palace of Crown Prince and Princess, Amalienborg
    Palace of Crown Prince and Princess,...
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  • ginte's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Palace

    by ginte Updated Jun 21, 2007

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    Amalienborg Palace is the royal couple's winter residence. It is the most outstanding piece of Rococo architecture in Denmark.

    Tourists can visit two of Amalienborg's palaces (mansions): Christian VIII's Palace, which has been partly turned into a museum of the Glücksburg dynasty; and Christian VII's Palace, which is used by the Queen to receive and entertain guests, but which is occasionally open for guided tours or special exhibitions.

    Very often you can see changing of the guard here. And don't try to sit somewhere in that square - you'll be warned about it by the guard immediatelly.

    The square of Amalienborg Palace
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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Palace and Frederik's Church

    by Nemorino Written Jul 29, 2009

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    Photos:
    1. Amalienborg Palace and Frederik's Church, from Operaen
    2. The dome of Frederik's Church, from the fourth balcony level of Operaen
    3. The harbor as seen from Operaen

    Frederik's Church, also known as the Marble Church, is the big domed building that you see when you look across the harbor from Operaen.

    The site for Operaen was carefully chosen so it would be on an axis with Frederik's Church and with Amalienborg Palace, which is the winter residence of the Danish Monarchy.

    1. Amalienborg Palace and Frederik's Church 2. Dome of Frederik's Church from 4th balcony 3. The harbor as seen from Operaen
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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Royal Castle

    by Sjalen Updated Apr 15, 2007

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    Well, if you're in town, why not see it. I'm not a royalist myself but I accept them and the Danish royals belong to the less stiff and the Danes themselves with a few exceptions absolutely adore anything to do with their royal family. The changing of the guards is at 12.00 daily and if you want to know more about that, Allan (TheView) is the one to contact as he used to be one! All in all, the palace is a nice place as it is so close to the seaside and you can wander around outside much as you please. The Queen lives in one wing and there is also a castle museum so that you can actually visit some of the interior too. If you want to see my photos from when the Crown Prince's married his Tasmanian Mary a few years ago, have a look at the travelogues on my Denmark page.

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    • Castles and Palaces
    • Seniors

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  • dejavu2gb's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Palace

    by dejavu2gb Written Feb 23, 2005

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    Amalienborg Palace, is the current residence of the Royal family of Denmark.
    Changing of the guard is at noon every day.
    The guards are not as stern as those in England, and these gave us a smile and nodded when we asked if we could have our picture taken next to him.

    Amalienborg Palace Palace Guard
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    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

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  • SandiMandi's Profile Photo

    Changing of the guard

    by SandiMandi Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The changing of the guard happens daily at Amalienborg at noon. There are lots of tourists witnessing this, so if you want to be in the front row, be there early. I've seen the same in Stockholm, so it wasn't on my list of things to see, but as I happened to be there right on time, I thought I' d watch it anyway.

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg

    by barryg23 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Amalienborg is one of the official homes of the Danish Monarchy. It's a huge complex in the north of Copenhagen with four palaces built around a large octagonal courtyard containing a statue of Frederik V in the centre.

    Amalienborg Slot from Marmokirken Frederik V Statue Amalienborg Slot Amalienborg Slot from Marmokirken Amalienborg Slot from Marmokirken

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  • mickeyboy07's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Slotsplads(Royal Palace's)

    by mickeyboy07 Written Oct 11, 2011

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    Home to the Danish Royal Family in the Winter months this one of Copenhagens most famous landmarks and very popular with both locals and tourists.It consists of four identical classicizing palace facades with rococo interiors around an octagonal courtyard,in the centre of the square is a monumental equestrian statue of Amalienborg's founder King Frederick V.
    Originally built for four noble families,however when Christianborg Palace burnt down in Feb of 1794 the Royal Family bought the Palaces and moved in.Over the years various King's and their families have lived here.The construction on all Palaces began in 1750 and was completed after ten years.Outside each Palace you will find the Danish Royal Guards who change every day at noon,there is also a museum here at a cost of 30dk per adult.

    Christian VII's Palace Royal Guards Entrance to Courtyard Equestrian Monument Inside the museum
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  • Tomtom-Paris's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg squareThis square...

    by Tomtom-Paris Written Sep 12, 2002

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    Amalienborg square
    This square is surrounded by four palaces built in the 18th century. In the centre of the square there is the statue of Frederick V, the founder.
    Now, one of the palace was Presently, the queen lives in one of them.

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  • tvor's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg palaces

    by tvor Written May 27, 2010

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    This is a large cobbled square with four identical palaces on the sides. The Queen (Margrete II) lives in one and the Crown Prince lives in another. One is for visiting dignitaries. I’m sure other minor Royals probably live in the fourth one. The palaces date to the mid 18th century and there is a museum in one of the buildings where you can see the State rooms. There seemed to be a very long queue to get in when we were in the square.

    It is also used as a traffic roundabout so you have to watch yourself walking through it. The traffic is stopped every day at noon so they can have the Changing of the Guard. It’s not as spectacular and not nearly as much pomp and circumstance as the one in London but it’s more accessible, I think. You stand on the square around the allotted borders and boundaries, where several police keep an eye on the crowd. The guards only number about a dozen and a half. They march here from Christianborg Palace and do some to-ing and fro-ing around one of the palaces as they change shifts.

    Off one side is the large Marmorkirken, or Marble Church, which is also worth a look into . The inside is baroque and a fine example except the church was only finished at the end of the 19th century. It was started in the true Baroque era in the 18th c. but the budget ran out and it was never finished for another 150 years while it say pretty much in ruins. It's lovely now, though with the soaring dome and lovely paintings and plaster work.

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  • SandiMandi's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg

    by SandiMandi Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Amalienborg is the winter residence of Queen Margareta II and it consists of four palaces surrounding a round square. It's been a royal residence since 1794 when the royal family moved there after a fire in Christiansborg palace. Amalienborg Palace was erected 1754-1760.

    At Amalienborg you can see the changing of the guard daily at noon.

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  • AnnS's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Slotsplads

    by AnnS Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Amalienborg Slotsplads is a very impressive square with an interesting historical background. Around the square are the four palaces of Amalienborg, one of which is the winter home of the Danish royal family. The square itself is very grand and in the centre is a statue of King Frederik V on horseback, dating back to 1771.

    Behind the square is Frederiks Kirke, commonly known as The Marble Church, which has the largest dome in Scandanavia.

    From the other side of the square, the harbour is just a few steps away, marked by a magnificent fountain.

    Amalienborg Palace Amalienborg Slotsplads Amalienborg Slotsplads & Frederiks Kirke Amalienborg Fountain

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Amalienborg Slot (Palace)

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Amalienborg is the Royal Family's current residence in Copenhagen. The family also spends much of the year at their summer home in Fredensborg Slot to the north. Amalienborg is comprised of four major buildings -- Christian VII's Palace, Christian VIII's Palace, Frederik VIII's Palace, and Christian IX's Palace -- situated around a central courtyard. This palace became home to the royal family after the second major fire destroyed Christiansborg in 1794.

    Frederik V was King of Denmark from 1746 to 1766. It was during his reign that Amalienborg was constructed. The bronze sculpture of Frederick V sits in the center of Amalienborg. It was created by Frenchman Jacques-Francois-Joseph Saly over the course of 20 years. The statue was completed in 1771 and is considered one of the greatest equestrian statues in the world.

    The main attraction at Amalienborg is the changing of the guards each day at noon. Two of the buildings have had a few rooms open to the public for the past 10 years, and are also worth a visit.

    Amalienborg Palace, Copenhagen Frederik V

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  • QuDee's Profile Photo

    The Royal Palace

    by QuDee Written Apr 16, 2007

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    Amalienborg is not open to the public. On rare occasions – such as royal birthdays, christenings, weddings etc. – the public has an opportunity to sign books of congratulations and drops off presents with the court administrators office.

    However one can walk freely around the courtyard – in fact, public street goes through it – and watch the changing of the guards at midday. The public Amaliehaven, by the waterfront, is a lovely calm oasis in the city, donated by the owner of Maersk (head offices just to the left down the quay from Amalienborg). Another Maersk donation – the operahouse – is just across the harbour, and the best view of it is of course from Amaliehaven.

    The Marblechurch seen from Amaliehaven

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  • JoostvandenVondel's Profile Photo

    Changing of the guards, Amalienborg

    by JoostvandenVondel Written Jun 24, 2008

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    When the Queen is in residence, the Danish Royal Guards stand outside the palace in two-hour shifts. The best changing of the guards happens when guards from the Rosenborg Castle march through the streets of the capital every day at 11:30 am to switch places with the guards at Amalienborg.

    Try and get to Amalienborg at about 11:50 am to see them marching up from the Marmorkirken to the palace.

    Changing of the guards Marmorkirken Arriving of the guards from Rosenborg Part of the palace complex Standing on guard
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    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • MikeBird's Profile Photo

    Watch the Changing of the Guard

    by MikeBird Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    In the open courtyard at the Amelienborg Palace they have a low key changing of the guard ceremony. We just happened upon it by chance. Sorry but I don't know how frequently they do this but I guess the guards probably do a stint of duty for about 2 hours at a time. Anyway it was good to see them looking so smart and very seriously performing their duties, all in step and time with sharp movements for their salutes and commands. It made me think I'm glad I'm not doing their job!

    On guard at the Amelienborg Palace

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