Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 40 Reviews

Slotsholmen, København K 33 37 55 00

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  • Christiansborg Palace
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  • Christiansborg Palace
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  • Christiansborg Palace
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  • Roeffie's Profile Photo

    Another Royal Palace!

    by Roeffie Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Christiansborg

    Christiansborg

    Christiansborg has several sights like:
    The Royal Reception Rooms
    The Parliament
    The Palace Church
    The Ruins
    The Riding Ground Complex
    The Royal Stable and Coach Museum
    The Theatre Museum
    The Royal Library Gardens

    Each of these sights can be visited seperately. Look on the website for opening hours, entrance fees and other info.

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  • ValbyDK's Profile Photo

    Absalons Borg / Københavns Slot

    by ValbyDK Updated Sep 8, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ruins
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    The Ruins under Christiansborg Palace is a very interesting place and tell the story of Copenhagen’s founding and the site’s development over more than 800 years. In 1902 archaeologists discovered the remains of the Blue Tower from København Slot (Copenhagen Castle) and in 1907 workmen - carrying out excavation work for the foundations of the third Christiansborg Palace – discovered the ruins of Absalons Borg (Absalon’s Castle).

    The Ruins have been open the public since 1924, and were restored in 2006-2007. At the same time the exhibitions were modernised with models and films about the first and second Christiansborg Palaces.

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  • ValbyDK's Profile Photo

    De Kongelige Repræsentationslokaler

    by ValbyDK Updated Sep 8, 2010

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    Entrance

    If you want to take a look inside the Christiansborg Palace, a guided tour through De Kongelige Repræsentationslokaler (the Royal Reception Rooms) is absolutely recommendable. Besides the Royal Reception Rooms you’ll pass the Throne Room, the Fredensborg Room, the Royal Chambers, the Great Hall (with Bjørn Nørgaard’s tapestries), the Queen’s Reference Library and the Alexander Room.

    I found the tour very interesting and every room had a great story to tell. Maybe the Great Hall was the most interesting with the 17 tapestries describing the history of Denmark. The tapestries were a gift from the Danish business community for Queen Margrethe’s 50th birthday. When you are walking through the Palace, remember to stop and enjoy the view of the surrounding squares from the windows.

    Check their webpage for info about opening hours and admission fees. Before entering the Palace you must put on soft overshoes to protect the floors. You’re not allowed to take photos inside the Palace – but smoking is allowed… if you are the Queen of Denmark…

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  • QuDee's Profile Photo

    Parliament on the ruins of past castles

    by QuDee Written Apr 16, 2007

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    This partly artificial island has been the location of several royal palaces, one built on the ruins of the last. In fact you can see parts of the old structures in the basement under the present Christiansborg, along with models of the different castles and a great insight into the history of the castle island.

    The Danish parliament (Folketinget) resides at the palace today, but there is only limited admission to the parliament hall and governmental rooms. However the Royal Reception Rooms are open to the public - that is, if the queen doesn’t have a meeting at Christiansborg that day.

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    visit the parlament.

    by cachaseiro Updated May 28, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    christiansborg.

    christiansborg is housing the danish parlament and is a nice building, both from the inside and the outside.
    it´s one of the more open parlaments of this world and you can visit there during daytime hours and walk around the compunds 24 hours a day.

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  • TheView's Profile Photo

    The ruins of Bishop Absalon`s Castle

    by TheView Updated May 22, 2006

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    Bishop Absalon on the way to his Castle
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    The location of the Christiansborg Palace is the same as the Castle of Bishop Absalon the founder of the city. The Castle was built in 1167 and razed by the Hansa League in 1369. They disliked this stronghold that much that there was sent stonemasons to demolish the castle stone by stone and it was covered with earthworks. Soon after the Hansa League left a new stronghold was made in the same place Copenhagen Castle. Copenhagen Castle was there until Christian VI had it demolished in 1731 to replace it with the first Christiansborg Palace that burned in 1794 and the second Palace was built this to was ravaged by fire. Only the church and some connecting buildings and the stables were saved. During the work on the foundation to the present Palace workers discovered the ruins of Absalon`s Castle and the old Copenhagen Castle. The public interest for preserving the ruins for posterity was tremendous therefore there was made the biggest reinforced concrete structure that Denmark had seen in 1908. And you can now visit it and a exhibition about all the buildings that was made here, in the celler under the Christinasborg Palace.

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    • Archeology

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  • bpacker's Profile Photo

    Christiansborg Palace

    by bpacker Updated Sep 23, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Democratic Palace, Christiansborg

    Not too far from Højbro Plads is Slotsholmen, a small island that houses Christianborg Palace. But instead of royals, you'll find democracy in this ancient palace as the Palace now houses the Folketinget, the Danish Parliament. Only parts of it are still used by the royal family for special occasion. You can take a guided tour in English through the granite and copper structure and ornate royal reception rooms used by the Queen when she receives foreign dignitaries.

    May-September, Tuesday-Sunday 11 am, 1 pm and 3 pm. October-April, Tuesday-Friday and Sunday 11 am and 1 pm. Adults around 27 DKK, children 10 DKK

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  • Pieter11's Profile Photo

    The Copenhagen Palace

    by Pieter11 Written Jan 26, 2005

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    The current Christiansborg Palace was built on top of the ruines of Bishop Absalon (the foundator of the city Copenhagen) his castle, out of 1167. This castle was replaced by the Christiansborg of Copenhagen Palace. All the rests of the old castle are now kept in the National Museum.

    Today, Christiansborg is unique because it both is the political centre of Denmark ánd it shows the rests of one of the oldest buildings of Denmark.

    It is opened daily from 9:30 - 15:30, but is closed at Christmas Time.

    Adults: 20 DK
    Children: 5 DK

    The interior is wealthy decorated with sculptures with gold and with a lot of old paintings of famous painters on the walls. This really is a palace as a palace is supposed to be.

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  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    Slotsholmen

    by Blatherwick Written Nov 8, 2004
    Slotsholmen

    This island is separated from the city centre by a moat-like canal. This is the site of Christiansborg Palace where the the national government of Denmark sits.

    You can visit the Royal Reception Chambers where the queen meets with other heads of state. Other sites include Thorvaldsens Museum, the excavated ruins of Absalon's Fortress, and the Museum of Royal Coaches

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Royal Stables

    by Sjalen Written Oct 25, 2004

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    The Kongelige Stald Etat, or the Royal Mews, at Christiansborg Palace is worth a visit when it is open on weekends. Not only does it house the royal stables with the horses in between marble pillars, it also has a section with all the magnificent royal carriages displayed, including the one used in the last wedding between Mary and Prince Frederik. Finally, there is a small museum telling you about the mews. You can also happen to catch the horses during practice in the paddock outside if you are lucky.

    Related to:
    • Horse Riding
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • Pakistaniguy's Profile Photo

    Must See #7: Folketinget

    by Pakistaniguy Updated Feb 1, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Danish Parliment

    The Parlimentary Chamber, called Folktinget, is where the 179 members of the Danish Parliment meet.. It was a very nice experience to go there with VT member Cachaseiro - Claus ! The parliment is very beautiful from inside but it is smaller than Pakistani Parliment building in Islamabad. May be because of smaller size of Denmark in comparision with Pakistan ! There are free tours in English at 14.00 hrs daily. In addition to the parlimentary chambers, the tour also takes in Wanderer's Hall, which contains the original copy of the Constitution of the Kingdom of Denmark.

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  • NunoF's Profile Photo

    Christianborg (2)

    by NunoF Written Jan 12, 2004

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Under Christian VII a new Christianborg Palace was erected, but a new disastrous fire broke out in 1884 when again only the riding and the chapel of the palace survived. Finally in 1916 the Christianborg Palace, which we know today, was inaugurated. It was solidly faced with 7000 granite ashlars from stones gathered in fields all over the country. Above the windows on the ground floor there are heads of famous Danish personalities carved in granite from Bornholm.
    Since 1918 Christianborg has been home of the Danish Government, the Folketing, to which there is public access.

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  • NunoF's Profile Photo

    Christianborg (1)

    by NunoF Written Jan 12, 2004

    One of the largest palaces in Denmark, Christianborg, is situated next to the Stock Exchange. In this very place the history of Copenhagen begins. Below the palace there is an exhibition, which shows remnants of the walls from the castle, which the founder of Copenhagen, Absalon, built in 1167. The castle was torn down in 1369 after the siege in 1251. Soon a new royal castle was built under Erik of Pomeranian and it lasted until 1731, when, after several extensions, it had become out of date and was torn down.
    A beautiful palace influenced by French rococo and Viennese baroque became the royal palace in 1741. The name became Christianborg after the reigning king Christian VI. In 1794 this magnificent palace burned to the ground. Only the riding grounds with the two rococo pavilions escaped the flames.

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  • CandS's Profile Photo

    Christianborg Palace

    by CandS Updated Aug 13, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Christianborg Palace

    The house of Danish parliament...

    Tours are May to September, Wednesday to Friday at 11 am and 3 pm; June to August also at 1 pm; October to April, Tuesday to Thursday and Saturday/Sunday at 9:30 am and 3:30 pm.

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Christiansborg Palace

    by Sjalen Updated Jun 25, 2003

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    This is the latest of several castles to stand on the site as the previous one was raged by fire for instance. Today, it houses the Danish parliament and on its famous balcony, the Prime minister declares the new monarch when one dies and is succeeded by the next in line. In the complex, you will also find the royal mews with its horses and the old Marble Bridge, which has survived its previous castle.

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    • Historical Travel

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