Marble Church - Frederiks Church, Copenhagen

37 Reviews

Frederiksgade 4, 1265 København K 3315 0144

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Looking up from inside
    Looking up from inside
    by jonkb
  • The cross on the altar.
    The cross on the altar.
    by jonkb
  • The Lamb with a victory standard.
    The Lamb with a victory standard.
    by jonkb
  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Beautiful church

    by solopes Updated Feb 23, 2014
    Copenhagen
    1 more image

    With the largest church dome in Scandinavia (and the fourth in Europe), with 12 columns covering a circle of 31 meters, this church was built during the 18th century, with a new version opened in 1894.
    A funny story - Kierkegaard was very critical about the official church, and ended... buried in a church. There!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • jonkb's Profile Photo

    Marble church – or Frederiks church

    by jonkb Updated Feb 12, 2014
    The cross on the altar.
    4 more images

    The most prominent church near Amalienborg is Frederiks church, more commonly known as the Marble Church. It was built as an integral part of Frederiksstaden (see my Amalienborg tip), and it’s still a working church.

    The church was originally planned to be more pompous than what it is now. The copula was ment to be a lot higher (diameter 45 meters), stretching out to the outer walls. As it sits now, its resting on twelve pillars, and is 31 m in diameter. Two freestanding towers were ment to be constructed. The main room itself is, however, just as it was planned. Frederik V sat the first stone for the church in 1749. The first architect, Eigtved died in 1754, and did not live to see the finished work. The French architect Jardin continued his work, but had to slow the work because of economic problems. At the end Prime Minister Struensee stopped the building in 1770 because of the great cost. Struensee was a doctor who had a lot of influence in Danish government, and became cabinet minister. There were several unsuccessful attempts to restart building after Struensees execution a few years later. Gruntvig and other prominent danes started campaigning to get the church finished, and at the end Tietgen bought the ruins in the 1870s and continued to build with new drawings made by professor Meldahl. The church was finally finished on 19th August 1894.

    Most of the church is built in Norwegian marble, except the upper part. The more economical stone Danish Faxe marble was used for those parts. The frescoes inside represent the apostles, and were painted by Chresten Overgaard after drawings by Henrik Olrik. Below the apostles there are twelve medallions. Motives from the 42nd Psalm can be seen flanking the altar. The church has two organs- The oldest is no longer in used and referred to as the Swan Organ. The more modern Marcussen organ is the organ currently in use. The front chapel contains woodcarvings depicting the Deposition.

    The outside of the church has a lot of statues. These are statues representing a number of well known persons for the Church. At the base of the church are statues of (in order from the entrance going north-west-south-east)
    Ansgar, bishop who is also called Denmark’s apostle.
    Knud the holy, one of the Danish Viking Kings.
    Peder Palladius (1503-1560), Lutheran bishop of Sealand immediately after the reformation
    Hans Tausen, 1494-1561, a johaniter munk, who taught Luthers teachings in Viborg and became one of the important reformators in Denmark. He was bishop in Ribe 1541-1561
    Jesper Brochmand (1585-1652), Bishop of Sealand that fought against catholic propaganda in Denmark.
    Søren Kierkegaard, 1813-1855, Denmark’s most important philosopher and father of the Christian existensialism. He lived in Copenhagen as a batchelor.
    B.S. Ingemann, or Thomas Kingo, and Hans Adolf Brorson who was two of the most prolific psalmwriters,
    Hans Egede (1686-1758), called Greenlands apostle. Norwegian born of Danish parents, went in search for Norse settelers on Greenland, and whined up running mission in Greenland.
    Johan Nordal Brun (1745-1816), Norwegian poet and bishop in Bergen, Norway.
    Nikolaj Edinger Balle (1744-1816), Bishop of Sealand
    Jacob Peter Mynster, (1775-1854), Danish theologist and bishop of Sealand.
    Nicolaj Frederik S. Grundtvig, Denmarks greatest psalm writer, theology, priest, historian, politician, etc. One of the people that made the Danish constitution.

    On the balustrade you’ll see some of church history’s most important figures:
    Moses, with the two stone tablets. Moses was the leader of the Israelites out of Egypt.
    Elias (9th century before Christ), Prophet in the old testament
    John the Baptist, who baptized Jesus, and spoke about his coming-
    Peter, one of the most famous apostles, often depicted with keys.
    Paulus, besides Peter, a famous apostle, who also wrote most of the letters in the New testament.
    Polykarp, bishop in Smyrna. Was burned at the stake because he wouldn’t let go of his Christian belief.
    Irenæus (c. 135-202), bishop of Lugdunum in Gaul. His writings are very important for early Christian theology.
    Athanasius (c. 297-373), bishop of Alexandria, orded in exile by several roman emperors.
    Johannes Chrysostomos (347-407), Patriark in Konstantinople, preached against immorality at the royal court, and was jailed as a heretic for that.
    Ambrosius (340-397), one of the most prominent churchfathers during the roman acceptance of christianity.
    Augustin (354-430), bishop and teacher. The Augustin Order is named after him.
    Hieronimus (347-420), one of the early church fathers, highly educated theologian.
    enedikt of Nursia, founder of the Benedictin confederation of autonomous munks.
    Grergor the Great, the only pope honored at the marble church. Known for working out the seven deadly sins.
    Bernhard of Clairvaux (1090-1153). A French abbot and the primary builder of the Cistercian order.
    John Wycliffe (c. 1320-1384), who translated the bible to a more common language, and got excommunicated for it. He was an early reformator of the church and is sometimes called the Morning Star of the Reformation.
    Johan Huss (1368-1415), Early church reformator who chritzised the church moral, and was highly influenced by Wucliffa writing. He was burned at the stake as a heretic, an event that caused the hussite wars.
    Martin Luther (1483-1546), begn as an augustin munk, wrote 95 theses and nailed them to the church door at Wittenberg. Founder of the Lutheran churches, of which the Danish church is one.

    General opening hours is (in 2013) monday-Thursday and saturdays 10-17. Wednesdays 10.18:30, Fridays and Sundays 12-17. There is service here every Sunday and holliday at 10:30, as well as baptisms, weddings, burrialservices and a range of other arrangements. Take a look at the webpage for details. Theres access to the tower every day during the summer and Saturdays, Sundays and holidays during the winter, at 1300 and 1500.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Gillybob's Profile Photo

    Marmorkirken

    by Gillybob Updated Jul 20, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Marmorkirken
    4 more images

    Also known as Frederiks Kirke (The Marble Church in English), this stately building is well worth a visit.

    The church, designed by architect Nicolai Eigtved, was intended as a monument and now boasts the largest church dome in Scandinavia which spans some 31 meters and rests on 12 columns.

    Construction began in 1749 but, due to a lack of funding, it was only completed some 150 years later, eventually opening in August 1894.

    OPENING HOURS :
    The church is open to the public
    Monday to Thursday : 10:00 - 17:00 (Wednsedays till 18:00)
    Friday to Sunday (inc. public holidays) : 12:00 to 17:00

    Admission is free.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • ValbyDK's Profile Photo

    Marmorkirken

    by ValbyDK Updated May 4, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Marble Church
    4 more images

    Frederiks Kirke (Frederik’s Church) is popularly known as Marmorkirken (The Marble Church) and is one of the most notable churches in Copenhagen. The foundation stone was set by King Frederik V in 1749, but the construction was slowed by the death of the original architect (Eigtved) and generally lack of money. The church was left incomplete and stood - more or less - as a ruin until 1894 when the present version of the church was financed by C.F. Tietgen (Danish financier and industrialist).

    The Church is open daily for public, and the interior is really beautiful. There is also admittance to the dome (the largest church dome in Scandinavia with a span of 31 m) with a nice view of Copenhagen and the southern coastline of Sweden. The dome is only open a couple of times during the weekend – check their webpage for opening hours…

    Outside Marmorkirken, there are several statues of Danish “Fathers of the Church” and of prophets, apostles and historical figures from the early and medieval Church. Among them is Martin Luther, the Father of the Reformation. Left from the entrance to the church you’ll find a sign that explains more about the statues – but only in Danish…

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Marble Church

    by mindcrime Written Mar 13, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Marble Church
    4 more images

    Marble Church(Marmorkirken) is a beautiful baroque church that officially is called Frederick’s Church (after King Frederick V). The construction began in 1749 (Frederick laid the first stone) but finished in 1894, only 150 years later due economic difficulties. Originally the church was designed as part of Frederiksstaden district to commemorate the 300 years jubilee of the 1st coronation of a member of the House of Oldenburg.

    The exterior was under renovation (pic 1) but we could see (as we were coming from the canal) and admire the largest dome in Scandinavia (and 4th in Europe!) that has a 31m diameter and rests on 12 columns. We also checked the detailed columns (pic 2), statues of prophets, apostles etc

    The church opens daily at 10.00am (fri-sun at noon), there were only 2 other visitors inside so we could slowly walk around and check the details. Some days you can go up to the dome and check the view from there but it was closed during our visit, I guess because of the restoration works.

    Free entrance but you have to pay for visiting the dome.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    The Marble Church

    by antistar Written Jan 4, 2012
    The Marble Church, Copenhagen

    The Marble Church, or Frederick's Church, is immense. It has the largest church dome in Scandinavia, and there are only three larger domes in all of Europe. Its perspective is such that it towers more and more above its neighbouring buildings, the further away you walk from it. It's a massively dominating building. Even from across the water, at the opera house, it stands out above Amalienborg Palace, which is in front of it.

    The church was named after King Frederick V, whose statue can be found in the centre of Amalienborg Palace's courtyard, directly en route to the harbour water. He laid the foundation stone, as the church was constructed as a part of Frederiksstaden, a district built to commemorate 300 years of royal decree by the Oldenburg family in Denmark.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mickeyboy07's Profile Photo

    Frederiks Kirke(The Marble Church)

    by mickeyboy07 Updated Oct 13, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Front and entrance of church
    4 more images

    The church was designed by the Architect'Nicholai Eigtved' in 1740 and was along with the rest of Frederiksstaden,a district of Copenhagen,intented to commemorate the 300 years jubilee of the first coronation of a member of the house of Oldenburg.The church has the largest church dome in Scandinavia,it rests on 12 columns,the inspiration was the St.Peter's Basilica in Rome.The foundation stone was set by King Frederik V in Oct.1749,but construction was slowed by budget cuts and in 1770 the original plans were discarded.The church was left incomplete for nearly 150 years until eventually the building was completed using limestone.The present version of the church was designed by 'Ferdinand Meldahl'and opened in Aug.1894.A series of statues of prominent figures encircles the grounds of the building.
    The church is open any time to the public but silence must be observed at all times.
    The church is currently undergoing some restoration as of Oct.2011.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • SandiMandi's Profile Photo

    Marble church

    by SandiMandi Written Aug 7, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    Frederiks church or the Marble church is right next to Amalienborg. The church looks amazing and very unusual because of its round shape. The interior is beautiful as well.

    The diameter of the enormous dome is over 30 m and the inspiration for the dome has been St. Peter's basilica in Rome.

    Was this review helpful?

  • robertbaum's Profile Photo

    Frederiks Kirke (Marmorkirken)

    by robertbaum Written May 20, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Frederiks Kirke (Marmorkirken)
    4 more images

    The Frederiks Kirke (Frederick's Church) is made of marble, thus it is known as Marmorkirken (Marble Church).

    The initial design for a Rococo church was drawn by the architect Nicolai Eigtved (1701-1754). But as a new trend in style, namely the Neoclassicism became en vogue, the design was further developed after the death of Eigtved by the French architect Nicolas-Henri Jardin (1720-1799). The foundation stone was laid in 1754 but due to financial problems the construction was halted in 1770. You can explore the digital model of Jardin's design.

    For almost a century the church was just a ruin although the design was continuously developed further during the years by at least 12 architects. Finally in 1849 the church was finished according to plans made by the architect Ferdinand Meldahl, 145 years after the foundation stone had been laid.

    The dome of the church is breathtaking. With a diameter of 31m it is the largest in Scandinavia.

    Opening hours: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday 10am-5pm, Wednesday 10am-6:30pm, Friday, Sunday 12pm-5pm, on public holidays 12pm-5pm

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • marielexoteria's Profile Photo

    The Marble Church

    by marielexoteria Updated Jan 7, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The church seen from the Opera house

    This beautiful church has the honor of having the biggest church dome in Scandinavia with a 31-meter span and resting in 12 columns. I liked the frescos on the ceiling, the writing on the walls and the peace you feel when you sit there and look at the beautiful surroundings.

    Free admittance, there's a sign where you're told to be quiet as this is a place of prayer.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tom_In_Madison's Profile Photo

    Great view of Copenhagen from top of the church

    by Tom_In_Madison Written Oct 13, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    View in one direction
    3 more images

    Marble Church

    While wandering around a Saturday afternoon, I came to this colossal 200 year old church and stepped inside and was pretty impressed. I got there about 12:45 and it turns out they open the top cuppola on Saturdays & Sundays at 1pm (and 3pm also I think?). So for 25Kroners I went up to the top on the inside and then to the top on the outside of the church.

    The view was good, but a bit nerve-wracking for those scared of heights like me on the inside especially, outside a little. Look at the pic of me and you can see it on my face. Then we went up about 140 steps, some very narrow and tightly-winding to get to the top and outside.

    You can get a 360degree view from there, and the view is phenomenal. This is a site/view well worth the price. You can see out to the far water and the windmills spinning in the wind, the palace which is right nearby, and down into the central city with their orange-ish roofs. We stayed up there about 15 minutes, then all had to march down.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • doug48's Profile Photo

    marorkirken

    by doug48 Written Aug 6, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    marble church

    the marorkirken, (marble church) is located a block south of amalieborg slot. the dome of the church is one of the largest in europe. it's design was based on the dome of the basilica of st. peters in rome. construction of the church was started in 1749 but due to cost overruns work on the church was abandoned in 1770. the church was finally completed 100 years later.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    Marmorkirken (The Marble Church)

    by yooperprof Written Jul 5, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dome - huset?

    Construction of the Marble Church (originally Frederikskirke) started during the reign of Frederik V - hence its original name. It was designed by architect Nikolai Eigtved to complement the nearby Amalienborg Palace, which Eigtved also planned. But the cost of the imported Norwegian marble soon became prohibitively high, and the unfinished building had to be mothballed for more than a century.

    Only at the end of the 1800s was the Marble Church completed - thanks to the contribution of one of Denmark's wealthiest men, businessman C F Tietgen. (Similar to the way in which Copenhagen's new opera house was recently bankrolled by shipping magnate Maersk McKinney Møller.)

    The Marble Church is a grand baroque structure - you'll think that you're in a Roman Catholic cathdral. This is not Bergmanesque austere Protestantism!

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Marmokirken

    by barryg23 Updated Jul 2, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Marmokirken
    4 more images

    The Marmokirken is clearly modelled on St. Peter's in Rome. Construction started in the mid-18th century but owing to lack of funds the church wasn't completed until the late 19th century.

    It's free to visit the interior but you have to pay 30 Krone and show up on the right day and at the right time to visit the dome. The attendant takes groups up twice daily at weekends at 1pm and 3pm.

    It's an interesting climb to the top. The first stop is on the circular balcony overlooking the interior of the church. Then you begin a long climb through the musty, dark interior of the dome until you reach the top.

    It's well worth it for the views. On a clear day you can see the Oresund bridge in the distance. This is one of the longest bridges in Europe and it connects Denmark to Sweden.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Castaner's Profile Photo

    The largest dome in Scandinavia

    by Castaner Written Jun 18, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    View of statues outside the Marble Church
    3 more images

    This Church was very different from most I have seen. It differs markedly from southern European Churches, firstly because the denomination is Lutheran, as opposed to Catholic, and the structure is that of a dome, rather than a cross-shaped basilica which one would find in mainly Catholic areas. It almost struck me as being architecturally similar to an Eastern Orthodox Churchwith the dome and whatnot. A very beautiful, different church to see for those who haven't visited a lot of the Nordic region (as I have not). And according to a number of sources, it appears that the dome on the church is the largest one in Scandinavia, with a span of 31 meters. Don't miss this treat in Copenhagen.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Backpacking
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Copenhagen

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

77 travelers online now

Comments

View all Copenhagen hotels