Marble Church - Frederiks Church, Copenhagen

37 Reviews

Frederiksgade 4, 1265 København K 3315 0144

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  • Looking up from inside
    Looking up from inside
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  • Phoenix.
    Phoenix.
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  • The angel watching over you
    The angel watching over you
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  • sparkieplug24's Profile Photo

    Marmorkirken - correct name Frederikskirken

    by sparkieplug24 Written May 29, 2006

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    The correct name is Frederikskirken but is known by the name the marble church. Building work on the church started in 1749 but work was halted in 1770 as costs were spiralling out of control. Work recommenced a century later but by this time the walls had become grass covered mounds which had to be dug out. The church was completed however plans had changed slighly and instead of using Norweign marble as was originally planned the church was completed using Danish limestones. The church has a large dome which was modelled on st Peters at the Vatican. The church is open Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday 10-5 and Wed 10-6. Friday to sunday it is opened 12-5.

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  • Frederik's Church or "Marmorkirke"

    by sabsi Updated Nov 30, 2005

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    Marble Church
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    Marmorkirke (Marble Church), which officially is called Frederiks Kirke, is my favourite church in town. It looks kinda misplaced from the outside because it looks more like being in Italy than like being in Scandinavia. Once inside I was absolutely thrilled by its appearance. There's a huge dome with a painted ceiling and there's absolute silence in there. Beautiful.

    You can climb the tower of the church on weekends and public holidays. As I visited on a Friday I couldn't. I guess you get nice views over the city and over Amalienborg Palace which is located "next door" from here.

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    FREDERIKS KIRKE, Marmorkirken

    by bpacker Updated Sep 23, 2005

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    This is the largest church dome in Europe!

    Of course, after seeing the church from far, we just had to go a little nearer to the green-domed structure. This church is often called the Marmorkirken or "marble church" and it was interesting to note that this church took 154 years to build simply because it was very costly !! In any case, Marmokirken was modeled on and intended to rival St. Peter's in Rome and true indeed, it ended up with one of the largest church domes in Europe. It was just amazing to look at.

    *Construction began in 1740, but had to stop in 1770 because of the costs. The church wasn't completed until 1894 -- using Danish marble instead of more expensive Norwegian marble.

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  • dejavu2gb's Profile Photo

    Marmorkirken (Frederiks Kirke)

    by dejavu2gb Updated Mar 8, 2005

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    Marmorkirken (Marble Church)
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    Situated not far from Amalienborg Palace, is one of the most beautiful landmarks of Copenhagen, Frederiks Kirke (Frederik's Church) or also known as Marmorkirken.
    You can see its impressive and gorgeous dome rising high above the rooftops of Copenhagen making it easy to spot from many places in the city.
    The first stone was laid by King Frederik V in 1749. Due to economic difficulties builing was postponed, and the church was only completed several years later in 1894.

    Its open daily and admission is free.

    (apologies for the picture quality, we had very foggy weather on our visit)

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  • rwlittle's Profile Photo

    Frederikskirken, also known as Marmorkirken

    by rwlittle Written Feb 1, 2005

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    Frederikskirken, also known as Marmorkirken

    A magnificent church, made of Swedish and Danish marble (hence "Marmorkirken"), Frederikskirken is located quite close to the Amelienborg Slotspad (visible in some of those photos). The church is surrounded by statues of famous Danes, such as Kierkegaard. Entrance to the church is free, though you will have to pay to climb up the dome. The church has quite a striking appearance, as you can see from the photo.

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  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    Marble Church

    by tini58de Updated Aug 17, 2004

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    Marble Church

    The Marble Church was started in 1749 by the order of King Frederik V, who wanted to have a new church in commemoration of his family's 300 years on the Danish throne. Unfortunately this was such an expensive architectural adventure, that the work on the new church was stopped several times because of lack of money. After over 100 years, the "ruins" of the unfinished church were bought by C.F. Tietgen, who then finished the construction.

    The Pantheon in Rome was the model and the marble came from Norway.

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  • AcornMan's Profile Photo

    Marble Church (Frederikskirken)

    by AcornMan Written Apr 28, 2004

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    The Marble Church was started in 1749 and was originally planned to compete with St. Peter's in Rome. However, the cost grew so high that it was not finished until the early 20th century. One of the cost savings was to do the dome in Danish marble rather than the more expensive Norwegian marble. Today the bronze-covered dome is one of the most dominant features of the Copenhagen skyline.

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    Interior of the Marble Church

    by Leipzig Updated Feb 26, 2004

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    Interior of the Marble Church

    Don't miss to see the impressive interior of the Marble Church. It was obviously purpose of the architect to rival St. Peter's in Rome. The church has one of the largest copper domes in the world. If you want you can climb the ~270 steps to the outdoor balcony to get a beautiful view over Copenhagen. I didn't because a travelling group of over 100 people wanted to do the same and I decided better to skip.

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    Frederikskirke (Frederik's Church)

    by Leipzig Updated Feb 26, 2004

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    The Marble Church

    Frederik's Church, also called "Marble Church", is located near Amalienborg. The church was built according to plans by the architect Ferdinand Meldahl. It was finished after 145 years of construction in 1894. Around the cupola are 16 statues of religious leaders and several sculptures of Danish ministers and bishops.

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  • Imaniac's Profile Photo

    Frederiks Kirke

    by Imaniac Updated Oct 29, 2003

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    Frederiks Kirke

    The Frederiks Kirke, or Marble Church, lies just opposite of Amalienborg Slot. Inside you'll see the 12 apostels that decorate the huge dome. Outside you can see 14 statues, representing the history of Denmark.

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    Frederiks Church

    by Maggies Updated Jun 29, 2003

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    The massive Baroque sanctuary of precious marble is also called The Marble Church. It was being built for about 1,5 century due to budget restrains and was finally finished at the end of 19th century. Its cuppola is really beautiful.

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    Marble Church

    by Sjalen Updated Jun 19, 2003

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    It's only really the foundation that is made of marble but look at its splendour nevertheless! Frederiks Church as its proper name is, was first started on in 1749, with inspiration from Rome, but wasn't completed until 150 years later due to financial difficulties when a new architect took over as the original died. 1874 it was completed and today, you can visit the dome weekends for a nice view of the surroundings. The area around the church is very continental rather than Danish. My Copenhagen intro picture shows the sculptures outside the church.

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  • zrim's Profile Photo

    Marmorkirchen

    by zrim Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Tremendous domed church constructed from mid 1700s and not completed until the end of the nineteenth century. The outside dome is guarded vy a ring of Danish saints and important clerics. The inside is very impressive and if you time your visit towards sundown light filters through the stained galss and projects blue and white crosses on the marbled walls of the dome.

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  • Herttuli's Profile Photo

    Marmor kirken (the Marble...

    by Herttuli Updated Aug 26, 2002

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    Marmor kirken (the Marble Church) is one of the well-known silhouettes of the city's skyline. In 1749, the first brick was layed to the church that was ment to be a rococo church made of Norwegian marble. This is the reason why it is called the Marble Church, even though it only is the lower part, which is of marble.
    The inspiration to the church came from St. Peter's Church in Rome.

    It took 150 years before the church was finished.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Frederikskirken

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Dec 2, 2013

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    Frederikskirken
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    Also known as the marble church, this church was started in 1740 but took until 1894 to be completed. It's known for its large dome, marble and stain glass windows.

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