Marble Church - Frederiks Church, Copenhagen

37 Reviews

Frederiksgade 4, 1265 København K 3315 0144

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  • Looking up from inside
    Looking up from inside
    by jonkb
  • The cross on the altar.
    The cross on the altar.
    by jonkb
  • The Lamb with a victory standard.
    The Lamb with a victory standard.
    by jonkb
  • Leipzig's Profile Photo

    Interior of the Marble Church

    by Leipzig Updated Feb 26, 2004

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    Interior of the Marble Church

    Don't miss to see the impressive interior of the Marble Church. It was obviously purpose of the architect to rival St. Peter's in Rome. The church has one of the largest copper domes in the world. If you want you can climb the ~270 steps to the outdoor balcony to get a beautiful view over Copenhagen. I didn't because a travelling group of over 100 people wanted to do the same and I decided better to skip.

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    Marmorkirchen

    by zrim Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Tremendous domed church constructed from mid 1700s and not completed until the end of the nineteenth century. The outside dome is guarded vy a ring of Danish saints and important clerics. The inside is very impressive and if you time your visit towards sundown light filters through the stained galss and projects blue and white crosses on the marbled walls of the dome.

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    Frederikskirke (Frederik's Church)

    by Leipzig Updated Feb 26, 2004

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    The Marble Church

    Frederik's Church, also called "Marble Church", is located near Amalienborg. The church was built according to plans by the architect Ferdinand Meldahl. It was finished after 145 years of construction in 1894. Around the cupola are 16 statues of religious leaders and several sculptures of Danish ministers and bishops.

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  • Castaner's Profile Photo

    The largest dome in Scandinavia

    by Castaner Written Jun 18, 2006

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    View of statues outside the Marble Church
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    This Church was very different from most I have seen. It differs markedly from southern European Churches, firstly because the denomination is Lutheran, as opposed to Catholic, and the structure is that of a dome, rather than a cross-shaped basilica which one would find in mainly Catholic areas. It almost struck me as being architecturally similar to an Eastern Orthodox Churchwith the dome and whatnot. A very beautiful, different church to see for those who haven't visited a lot of the Nordic region (as I have not). And according to a number of sources, it appears that the dome on the church is the largest one in Scandinavia, with a span of 31 meters. Don't miss this treat in Copenhagen.

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  • Imaniac's Profile Photo

    Frederiks Kirke

    by Imaniac Updated Oct 29, 2003

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    Frederiks Kirke

    The Frederiks Kirke, or Marble Church, lies just opposite of Amalienborg Slot. Inside you'll see the 12 apostels that decorate the huge dome. Outside you can see 14 statues, representing the history of Denmark.

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  • Maggies's Profile Photo

    Frederiks Church

    by Maggies Updated Jun 29, 2003

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    The massive Baroque sanctuary of precious marble is also called The Marble Church. It was being built for about 1,5 century due to budget restrains and was finally finished at the end of 19th century. Its cuppola is really beautiful.

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  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    Marble Church

    by tini58de Updated Aug 17, 2004

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    Marble Church

    The Marble Church was started in 1749 by the order of King Frederik V, who wanted to have a new church in commemoration of his family's 300 years on the Danish throne. Unfortunately this was such an expensive architectural adventure, that the work on the new church was stopped several times because of lack of money. After over 100 years, the "ruins" of the unfinished church were bought by C.F. Tietgen, who then finished the construction.

    The Pantheon in Rome was the model and the marble came from Norway.

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  • AcornMan's Profile Photo

    Marble Church (Frederikskirken)

    by AcornMan Written Apr 28, 2004

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    The Marble Church was started in 1749 and was originally planned to compete with St. Peter's in Rome. However, the cost grew so high that it was not finished until the early 20th century. One of the cost savings was to do the dome in Danish marble rather than the more expensive Norwegian marble. Today the bronze-covered dome is one of the most dominant features of the Copenhagen skyline.

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  • sparkieplug24's Profile Photo

    Marmorkirken - correct name Frederikskirken

    by sparkieplug24 Written May 29, 2006

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    The correct name is Frederikskirken but is known by the name the marble church. Building work on the church started in 1749 but work was halted in 1770 as costs were spiralling out of control. Work recommenced a century later but by this time the walls had become grass covered mounds which had to be dug out. The church was completed however plans had changed slighly and instead of using Norweign marble as was originally planned the church was completed using Danish limestones. The church has a large dome which was modelled on st Peters at the Vatican. The church is open Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday 10-5 and Wed 10-6. Friday to sunday it is opened 12-5.

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  • Herttuli's Profile Photo

    Marmor kirken (the Marble...

    by Herttuli Updated Aug 26, 2002

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    Marmor kirken (the Marble Church) is one of the well-known silhouettes of the city's skyline. In 1749, the first brick was layed to the church that was ment to be a rococo church made of Norwegian marble. This is the reason why it is called the Marble Church, even though it only is the lower part, which is of marble.
    The inspiration to the church came from St. Peter's Church in Rome.

    It took 150 years before the church was finished.

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  • Frederik's Church or "Marmorkirke"

    by sabsi Updated Nov 30, 2005

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    Marble Church
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    Marmorkirke (Marble Church), which officially is called Frederiks Kirke, is my favourite church in town. It looks kinda misplaced from the outside because it looks more like being in Italy than like being in Scandinavia. Once inside I was absolutely thrilled by its appearance. There's a huge dome with a painted ceiling and there's absolute silence in there. Beautiful.

    You can climb the tower of the church on weekends and public holidays. As I visited on a Friday I couldn't. I guess you get nice views over the city and over Amalienborg Palace which is located "next door" from here.

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    The Marble Church

    by antistar Written Jan 4, 2012
    The Marble Church, Copenhagen

    The Marble Church, or Frederick's Church, is immense. It has the largest church dome in Scandinavia, and there are only three larger domes in all of Europe. Its perspective is such that it towers more and more above its neighbouring buildings, the further away you walk from it. It's a massively dominating building. Even from across the water, at the opera house, it stands out above Amalienborg Palace, which is in front of it.

    The church was named after King Frederick V, whose statue can be found in the centre of Amalienborg Palace's courtyard, directly en route to the harbour water. He laid the foundation stone, as the church was constructed as a part of Frederiksstaden, a district built to commemorate 300 years of royal decree by the Oldenburg family in Denmark.

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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Beautiful church

    by solopes Updated Feb 23, 2014
    Copenhagen
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    With the largest church dome in Scandinavia (and the fourth in Europe), with 12 columns covering a circle of 31 meters, this church was built during the 18th century, with a new version opened in 1894.
    A funny story - Kierkegaard was very critical about the official church, and ended... buried in a church. There!

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  • jonkb's Profile Photo

    Marble church – or Frederiks church

    by jonkb Updated Feb 12, 2014
    The cross on the altar.
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    The most prominent church near Amalienborg is Frederiks church, more commonly known as the Marble Church. It was built as an integral part of Frederiksstaden (see my Amalienborg tip), and it’s still a working church.

    The church was originally planned to be more pompous than what it is now. The copula was ment to be a lot higher (diameter 45 meters), stretching out to the outer walls. As it sits now, its resting on twelve pillars, and is 31 m in diameter. Two freestanding towers were ment to be constructed. The main room itself is, however, just as it was planned. Frederik V sat the first stone for the church in 1749. The first architect, Eigtved died in 1754, and did not live to see the finished work. The French architect Jardin continued his work, but had to slow the work because of economic problems. At the end Prime Minister Struensee stopped the building in 1770 because of the great cost. Struensee was a doctor who had a lot of influence in Danish government, and became cabinet minister. There were several unsuccessful attempts to restart building after Struensees execution a few years later. Gruntvig and other prominent danes started campaigning to get the church finished, and at the end Tietgen bought the ruins in the 1870s and continued to build with new drawings made by professor Meldahl. The church was finally finished on 19th August 1894.

    Most of the church is built in Norwegian marble, except the upper part. The more economical stone Danish Faxe marble was used for those parts. The frescoes inside represent the apostles, and were painted by Chresten Overgaard after drawings by Henrik Olrik. Below the apostles there are twelve medallions. Motives from the 42nd Psalm can be seen flanking the altar. The church has two organs- The oldest is no longer in used and referred to as the Swan Organ. The more modern Marcussen organ is the organ currently in use. The front chapel contains woodcarvings depicting the Deposition.

    The outside of the church has a lot of statues. These are statues representing a number of well known persons for the Church. At the base of the church are statues of (in order from the entrance going north-west-south-east)
    Ansgar, bishop who is also called Denmark’s apostle.
    Knud the holy, one of the Danish Viking Kings.
    Peder Palladius (1503-1560), Lutheran bishop of Sealand immediately after the reformation
    Hans Tausen, 1494-1561, a johaniter munk, who taught Luthers teachings in Viborg and became one of the important reformators in Denmark. He was bishop in Ribe 1541-1561
    Jesper Brochmand (1585-1652), Bishop of Sealand that fought against catholic propaganda in Denmark.
    Søren Kierkegaard, 1813-1855, Denmark’s most important philosopher and father of the Christian existensialism. He lived in Copenhagen as a batchelor.
    B.S. Ingemann, or Thomas Kingo, and Hans Adolf Brorson who was two of the most prolific psalmwriters,
    Hans Egede (1686-1758), called Greenlands apostle. Norwegian born of Danish parents, went in search for Norse settelers on Greenland, and whined up running mission in Greenland.
    Johan Nordal Brun (1745-1816), Norwegian poet and bishop in Bergen, Norway.
    Nikolaj Edinger Balle (1744-1816), Bishop of Sealand
    Jacob Peter Mynster, (1775-1854), Danish theologist and bishop of Sealand.
    Nicolaj Frederik S. Grundtvig, Denmarks greatest psalm writer, theology, priest, historian, politician, etc. One of the people that made the Danish constitution.

    On the balustrade you’ll see some of church history’s most important figures:
    Moses, with the two stone tablets. Moses was the leader of the Israelites out of Egypt.
    Elias (9th century before Christ), Prophet in the old testament
    John the Baptist, who baptized Jesus, and spoke about his coming-
    Peter, one of the most famous apostles, often depicted with keys.
    Paulus, besides Peter, a famous apostle, who also wrote most of the letters in the New testament.
    Polykarp, bishop in Smyrna. Was burned at the stake because he wouldn’t let go of his Christian belief.
    Irenæus (c. 135-202), bishop of Lugdunum in Gaul. His writings are very important for early Christian theology.
    Athanasius (c. 297-373), bishop of Alexandria, orded in exile by several roman emperors.
    Johannes Chrysostomos (347-407), Patriark in Konstantinople, preached against immorality at the royal court, and was jailed as a heretic for that.
    Ambrosius (340-397), one of the most prominent churchfathers during the roman acceptance of christianity.
    Augustin (354-430), bishop and teacher. The Augustin Order is named after him.
    Hieronimus (347-420), one of the early church fathers, highly educated theologian.
    enedikt of Nursia, founder of the Benedictin confederation of autonomous munks.
    Grergor the Great, the only pope honored at the marble church. Known for working out the seven deadly sins.
    Bernhard of Clairvaux (1090-1153). A French abbot and the primary builder of the Cistercian order.
    John Wycliffe (c. 1320-1384), who translated the bible to a more common language, and got excommunicated for it. He was an early reformator of the church and is sometimes called the Morning Star of the Reformation.
    Johan Huss (1368-1415), Early church reformator who chritzised the church moral, and was highly influenced by Wucliffa writing. He was burned at the stake as a heretic, an event that caused the hussite wars.
    Martin Luther (1483-1546), begn as an augustin munk, wrote 95 theses and nailed them to the church door at Wittenberg. Founder of the Lutheran churches, of which the Danish church is one.

    General opening hours is (in 2013) monday-Thursday and saturdays 10-17. Wednesdays 10.18:30, Fridays and Sundays 12-17. There is service here every Sunday and holliday at 10:30, as well as baptisms, weddings, burrialservices and a range of other arrangements. Take a look at the webpage for details. Theres access to the tower every day during the summer and Saturdays, Sundays and holidays during the winter, at 1300 and 1500.

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  • gordonilla's Profile Photo

    Marmorkirken aka Marble Church

    by gordonilla Updated Aug 8, 2005

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    The Marble Church
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    The church is open:

    Monday to Thursday - 10.00:17.00

    Wednesday - 10.00:18.00

    Friday - Sunday - 12.00:17.00

    public holidays - 12.00:170.00

    Try the virtual tour on their website!

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